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Reducing ramp angle inside boot?

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 
How could one reduce ramp angle inside the boot?
post #2 of 18
Grind down the heel and shim up the forefoot. A little bit on both ends makes a difference.
post #3 of 18
Thread Starter 
Are you referring to ginding down the heel of the footbed, or something else? Remember, I'm looking to accomplish this inside the boot, if reasonably possible.
post #4 of 18
you can grind down the heel of the footbed, maybe the liner, and for sure the boot board (zeppa)

and again raise the toe the same way.

balance is one thing, but make sure to keep the boots fit as well.
post #5 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by oboe View Post
Are you referring to ginding down the heel of the footbed, or something else? Remember, I'm looking to accomplish this inside the boot, if reasonably possible.
Yeah, I gotcha on the inside thing.

I was referring to the zeppa/shell under the liner.
post #6 of 18
just be carefull not to go too far, you will reduce the ramp angle but increase the nett forward lean...too much and you could put excess strss on the achillies and cause a problem there..... a couple of mm is loads
post #7 of 18
Thread Starter 
I'm really enjoying this! Thanks, folks!

So, would over doing the zeppa thing cause the same kind of problem as reducing ramp angle from the outside - either by sole grinding or interchangeable heel and toe lugs? and also, is that adjustment better made from the outside than the inside, and if so, why?
post #8 of 18
There is a thread in this forum just started about doing things inside or outside the boot. If you look through it you'll get some answers. But doint things outside the boot will not change the relationship between the foot and tibia, right?

Lou
post #9 of 18
Just for kicks I thought I would ask what is the reason you want to reduce the ramp angle inside the boot? Perhaps there is another salution for your problem...
post #10 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by oboe View Post
I'm really enjoying this! Thanks, folks!

So, would over doing the zeppa thing cause the same kind of problem as reducing ramp angle from the outside - either by sole grinding or interchangeable heel and toe lugs? and also, is that adjustment better made from the outside than the inside, and if so, why?
by grinding the zeppa you are lowering the heel which as has been said will reuce the ramp angle..... it will however increase the dorsiflexing requirement of the ankle in order to get the heel on the "new" bottom of the boot internally...if you have that ROM then fine [if you are hyermobile then this is a great way to get some resistance into the achillies] without having the amount of range to allow the hell to sit on the base it will put excessive stress on the achillies and could cause a tear...NOT NICE.

reducing the angle from outside the boots toes lifters on boots or bindings will change what happens above the top of the boot, it will shift COM back by varying degrees dependant on the person

it really sounds to me like you need to get to someone who can assess all this and help to guide you through the process having seen your feet and boots

Strolz adds a good question...why do you want to do this????
post #11 of 18
Thread Starter 
Here's the history of the issue:

At the EpicSki Academy in Aspen a few years ago, I had the good fortune to meet and work with Eric Ward and Bud Heisman (sp?). It was extraordinarily instructive. They had us ski with shims under the inside of the boot sole, under the outside of the boot sole, under the toe of the boot, then under the heel of the boot. All of us hated the feeling of skiing with the shim under the heel of the boot.

It was observed that I had a really bad back seat problem (don't know the technical name for it). Putting a shim under the toe - while it wasn't a full cure - helped a lot.

Since I was skiing in Lange 120 Comp M boots, the heel and toe lugs were interchangeable, and I opted for the highest toe lug and lowest heel lug.

It also has been my own experience that skiing in really stiff boots tossed me into the back seat.

Now I have a pair of Dalbello Krypton Il Moro boots, which seem to have just the right flex for me. I've bought some shims from Mosh after following his procedure for evaluation, and it turns out to be pretty much the same as what I ended up with that time in Aspen. However . . . .

These boots don't have interchangeable heel and toe lugs, and I really want to avoid messing around with irreversible changes to the boot sole. Therefore, I'm interested in trying to accomplished the same skiing result inside the boot.

Now I'll be skiing in
post #12 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by oboe View Post
Here's the history of the issue:

At the EpicSki Academy in Aspen a few years ago, I had the good fortune to meet and work with Eric Ward and Bud Heisman (sp?). It was extraordinarily instructive. They had us ski with shims under the inside of the boot sole, under the outside of the boot sole, under the toe of the boot, then under the heel of the boot. All of us hated the feeling of skiing with the shim under the heel of the boot.

It was observed that I had a really bad back seat problem (don't know the technical name for it). Putting a shim under the toe - while it wasn't a full cure - helped a lot.

Since I was skiing in Lange 120 Comp M boots, the heel and toe lugs were interchangeable, and I opted for the highest toe lug and lowest heel lug.

It also has been my own experience that skiing in really stiff boots tossed me into the back seat.

Now I have a pair of Dalbello Krypton Il Moro boots, which seem to have just the right flex for me. I've bought some shims from Mosh after following his procedure for evaluation, and it turns out to be pretty much the same as what I ended up with that time in Aspen. However . . . .

These boots don't have interchangeable heel and toe lugs, and I really want to avoid messing around with irreversible changes to the boot sole. Therefore, I'm interested in trying to accomplished the same skiing result inside the boot.

Now I'll be skiing in
Without commenting on whether or not a toe lift is the 'right' fix, if you want to test this concept without ruining your boots, why not just try a couple different thicknesses of delrin under your toepiece? You will just need correspondingly longer screws.
post #13 of 18
Oboe,

+1 Or you could simply lay any material from delrin to a popsicle stick on the binding AFD before you step in and take 1 run down the hill. From a binding safety standpoint, it is not advised to ski around with anything stuffed between the boot and the binding.

However in 1 run, on varying terrain, executing large and small turns, you will immediatly know the results of your test. If it works, make the change permanent, if it does not work, move on!

Would also be curious about your ankle ROM, as well as if you have any support under your foot ( other than canted shims ), have you had any of the Epicski experts assess your foot and lower leg shape, flexibility, heel stance, 1st or 5th mobility, arch flexibility, etc?

CEM did a good job of explaining how in the boot versus out of the boot effects which aspect of your balance. The question should be what do you have ( in terms of assessment)that will steer us to a competent solution.
post #14 of 18
Thread Starter 
The REAL answer is to get Mosh to ESA Stowe, because the chances I'll be flying west this winter are kinda slim.
post #15 of 18
Oboe,

Innerboot Works, Stowe VT. Benny Wax could help you assess your needs. Or if you would like a day trip to Stratton, see Nick Blaylock or Bill Haight at Green Mountain Orthotic Labs.

jim
post #16 of 18
Thread Starter 
Starthaus, I'm very familiar with who the players are in this game. I just want to work with Mosh if I can.
post #17 of 18
Oboe, thank you.
post #18 of 18
Thread Starter 
Lou, for what are you thanking me?
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