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AT setup advice

post #1 of 28
Thread Starter 
I've decided to add some AT setups to my quiver this season. I bought a pair of new Dynastar Big Troubles and Rossi B4's and am planning the following:

Dynastar Big Troubles w/ Fritschi Freerides
- for No. VT resort and sidecountry

Rossi B4 w/ Fritschi Explorer
- strictly for No. VT backcountry tours

I got crazy deals on the skis, so probably won't part with them, but any criticism on the bindings???
post #2 of 28
Essentially the same bindings.

The freerides will ski a little better than the explorers.

They'll tour very comparably.

I'd use the freerides for backcountry tours and get some dukes for lift riding/slackcountry.
post #3 of 28
Do you have an AT boot?
post #4 of 28
Thread Starter 
Yeah, I just got some Garmont G-rides in the mail that fit really well (same size as my Garmont tele's) and am waiting for some Scarpa Tornado LE's from Tramdock that were a similar size and a lot cheaper. If the Scarpa's fit just as well, I'll probably keep them over the more expensive Garmonts. They are both older models, but new $225 boots are better than current year $750 boots any day.

So if I went with Markers for the resort pair, I would be more inclined to go with Baron's which are lighter and cheaper. I'm only 160 lbs. and won't need a DIN up to 16. Any reason not to?
post #5 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by skierdon View Post
Rossi B4 w/ Fritschi Explorer
- strictly for No. VT backcountry tours

I got crazy deals on the skis, so probably won't part with them, but any criticism on the bindings???
Return the G-Ride for the MegaRide, and return the Explorer for the Dynafit Comfort or Vertical ST -- condemning yourself to all the wasted exertion on a purely backcountry setup is pointless.
post #6 of 28
Dynafit is my suggestion. They are about 4 pounds lighter than nearly all other AT binding. Weight matters, and they are of excellent choice for the backcountry.
If you have the money, you will not look back.
post #7 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by skierdon View Post
So if I went with Markers for the resort pair, I would be more inclined to go with Baron's which are lighter and cheaper. I'm only 160 lbs. and won't need a DIN up to 16. Any reason not to?
Go with the Baron's , pretty much the same function built with lighter materials. Delrin vs magnesium. The din is plenty high unless you're hucking big drops.
post #8 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by skierdon View Post
I've decided to add some AT setups to my quiver this season. I bought a pair of new Dynastar Big Troubles and Rossi B4's and am planning the following:

Dynastar Big Troubles w/ Fritschi Freerides
- for No. VT resort and sidecountry

Rossi B4 w/ Fritschi Explorer
- strictly for No. VT backcountry tours

I got crazy deals on the skis, so probably won't part with them, but any criticism on the bindings???
Lots of people have complained about Freeride, including myself. But they're really not that bad. I think they are a lot flexier than alpine bindings, but then again all my alpine bindings are metal Salomons. I've had trouble with insta-tele due to ski flex and unintentional heel lever release by opposing ski edges and contact with trees, but being the crafty fellow I am I devised a pretty simple fix for the problem. I personally think the older white and black Freerides are fine as long as you're not on hard snow or trying to drive a really stiff ski (my touring rig right now is Freerides on a pair of Sanouks). The new all black ones I've never tried, but I hear they're less flexy and don't need to be modified to get rid of the insta-tele. As far as release/retention goes, I've had zero problems.

I've never skied on Dynafits mostly because I don't have Dynafit compatable AT boots and I also just use my Alpine boots for sidecountry and short stuff (which is the majority of the touring I do). I have sat around waiting for guys to clear the ice out of their Dynafit system tho. If I were into longer tours I'd look into them, but I'm really not.
post #9 of 28
I spray silicon on my Dynafit rear binding attachment and never had a single icy encounter... not even on the East Cost.
They are so light... I mean litterally pounds lighter.

Indeed, Scarpa boots (or similar AT boots) are required. It's a question of money, and weight though>
Binding: $450
Boots - dedicated: $650
post #10 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ludovic View Post
I spray silicon on my Dynafit rear binding attachment and never had a single icy encounter... not even on the East Cost.
I remember a wrangler in the Grand Canyon saying " a man who hasn't fallen off a horse hasn't ridden much"

Dynafits are light, but for yo-yoing on a powder day they are not so good. I have some, and use them for one run climbs on long, high altitude days. For general use, and patrolling, the freeride has been great.
post #11 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by newfydog View Post
Dynafits are light, but for yo-yoing on a powder day they are not so good.
Anyone who thinks that has to be suffering from some combination of ignorance and incompetence.
For Dynafit transitions, skin > ski entails rotating the heel piece and stepping down.
For ski > skin:
- press button to exit binding
[afix skin]
- rotate heel piece to tour mode
- align boot heel with the heel ledge on the binding
- step down with toes
Dynafit transitions are as fast as with any other binding.
post #12 of 28
I do a lot of bc skiing with a lot of people with a lot of different bindings. Maybe all the people I ski with are "incompetent," but in deep soft snow with a lot of off and on ("yo yo skiing") Dynafit bindings definitely have a higher pain in the a$$ factor from my experience. For convenience of getting in and out, locking and unlocking the heels, and changing the elevators, I'll take the Fritchis on all counts. Now when you are talking weight, there is no comparison, the Dynafits are pounds lighter.
post #13 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jonathan Shefftz View Post
Anyone who thinks that has to be suffering from some combination of ignorance and incompetence.
.
Or maybe a whole lot more powder than you see out there in Massachusetts.

I routinely stomp into my Fritschis in waist deep powder where I can't even see the ski. I can get the boot in there by feel, and it is almost always ready to go. If it isn't, I can flick the heel up and down with the poles, stomp a bit. and it seats cleanly.

Thats skiing in the real world. You can't do that with a Dynafit.
post #14 of 28
I have some friends that did a heli into a lodge in the Canadian Monashees and hike for turns for a week with a guide trip. They averaged over 5,000 vertical a day in very deep snow. The Dynafit users were generally having problems getting into their bindings by the end of each that the Fritchi users were not. On the other hand, with that kind of climbing it was deemed an acceptable sacrifice. They both have their advantages. I believe the guides generally were using Dynafits, but they had to break all the trail.
post #15 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jonathan Shefftz View Post
Anyone who thinks that has to be suffering from some combination of ignorance and incompetence.
Yeah. One of the guys I saw having problems with icy Dynafits was Rod Newcomb. What a JONG he is.
post #16 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by newfydog View Post
Or maybe a whole lot more powder than you see out there in Massachusetts.
We're allowed to drive and fly out of state too.
Three untracked powder days so far this season:
http://picasaweb.google.com/jshefftz...023Killington#
http://picasaweb.google.com/jshefftz/20081029Windham#
http://picasaweb.google.com/jshefftz...dhamHalloween#
(Missed out on this past weekend unfortunately because of timing issues.)
Two more untracked powder days coming up tomorrow and Thursday.
Last season was also pretty good for in-state powder, with eight untracked days.
Anyway, all of these are with Dynafitized partners, and we never have problems with transitions.
post #17 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jonathan Shefftz View Post
Last season was also pretty good for in-state powder, with eight untracked days.
.
Eight whole days?

Thats a good week out here
post #18 of 28
Too bad all that snow falls on Mt. Flatchelor.
post #19 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by newfydog View Post
Eight whole days?

Thats a good week out here
Those are just for quick outings of ~6k vert max within just about an hour from my house -- much more powder available in New England from longer drives.
Plus my main focus is western trips for late spring & early summer (in your environs).
post #20 of 28
My .02, no matter what you do get boots that have the Dynafit sockets, that way you got the option. If you do go with Dynafit, you've got to bookmark Dawson's amazing amount of info at wildsnow, see http://www.wildsnow.com/articles/dyn...faq-index.html

For icing prevention, just rubbing surfaces with alpine wax works too, and seems to me to last longer than spray.

luna
post #21 of 28
I guess my last post got moderated for some reason, probably because I'm new here or it had a link in it. At any rate, just wanted to put in a vote for Dynafit if you really want to do the kind of backcountry skiing where you earn your turns with muscle power. But beware that Dynafit takes some getting used to, especially when putting them on in powder. Tip on that is to not hurry.
post #22 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by lunaguy View Post
I guess my last post got moderated for some reason, probably because I'm new here or it had a link in it. . But beware that Dynafit takes some getting used to, especially when putting them on in powder. Tip on that is to not hurry.
Welcome to Epic! The moderators aren't so bad here usually.

I've had plenty of time to get used to my Dynafits. I'm wondering if Dynafits haven't improved a bit. Mine are primordial, so old they were first mounted on straight and narrow skis, and they don't snap into the holes every stomp. One of my regular partners has a pair just as old.

We often go up to nab a few runs on the cone at Mt Bachelor before the lifts open, so we're always in a hurry. We never grab our Dynafits, always the Fritschis.

My friend breaks the trail for me.... something about competing in three Olympics as a cross-country skier, skiing 200 days a year, gives him the ability to do that pretty fast. I guess if he weren't suffering from the combination of ignorance and incompetence he'd be able to fit in just as many runs with the Dynafits.
post #23 of 28

AT

Quote:
Originally Posted by newfydog View Post

We often go up to nab a few runs on the cone at Mt Bachelor before the lifts open, so we're always in a hurry. We never grab our Dynafits, always the Fritschis.

_My friend breaks the trail for me.... something about competing in three Olympics as a cross-country skier, skiing 200 days a year, gives him the ability to do that pretty fast. I guess if he weren't suffering from the combination of ignorance and incompetence he'd be able to fit in just as many runs with the Dynafits.
Love it !
post #24 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by newfydog View Post
I guess if he weren't suffering from the combination of ignorance and incompetence he'd be able to fit in just as many runs with the Dynafits.
Agreed -- or rather, if he knew what he was doing, he'd get in far more runs on his Dynafits.
And if he really doesn't use them much, I'd be happy to buy them from him (seriously).
post #25 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by newfydog View Post
Eight whole days?

Thats a good week out here

Newfs Rule
"The west is the best"
James Douglas Morrison
Freerides = the crappiest touring stride of any at binder
post #26 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by skifishbum View Post

Newfs Rule
"The west is the best"
James Douglas Morrison
Freerides = the crappiest touring stride of any at binder
Super dog! Thanks for sharing the pic! Gave my 180 lb slobber beast a bath yesterday. What a job.

Yeah, the Naxo has a better touring stride, but I'm not convinced all the fancy binding machanics are any more useful than say, loose top buckles.
post #27 of 28
If you are really going after the vertical without machinery you'll get more vert with Dynafit. Naxo can work, but the pivot makes kick turns tricky. In my opinion the best new setup is to just get a good deal on something and go enjoy it, then upgrade when you figure out what style you are really going to go with. Things to stay away from would be Alpine Treker and older bindings that don't have much dealer or manufacturer support. If you buy used on Ebay, for example, make sure you get later model stuff.
post #28 of 28

Dynafits Rule

Brother,
I've used the Dukes and they can lock a foot like no other. They are terrible if you wanted to skin up into the ozone for an epic huck but won't let you down if your doing crazy kid stuff where an orthopod comes in handy. But as a fat boy riding on the snow, Fritschis & Silvrettas don't work for me at all. Once I tried Dynafits, I will never, ever go back to anything that looks semi-conventional. They cost less, the same or a bit more depending on the model but I have done everything on them and they haven't failed me. I broke the heel doodad once but I wasn't making good choices (as my wife would tell me). I am a big boy and they rock so if you get a chance, try them. As far as skis and boots, go with what you like and works for you.

Peace
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