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Is a black diamond really a black somewhere else? - Page 3

post #61 of 73
I'm pretty sure they mean 66 PERCENT grade, and not degrees, which would make sense for 25-30 degree slope. Not to mention it isn't sustained for long and I believe (don't yell at me if I'm wrong... I've never skied in PA but just by the trail map I looked at years ago) it's in the trees, which is probably never open/in better conditions then a treeless run because of the amount of skiers skiing down it.
post #62 of 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA View Post
I to hate automatics but I love sychros so double clutching is not for me.
Off topic, but...

Even with synchros double clutching is still something useful on downshifts, especially into 1st, to make them smoother, more stable, and cause less wear to your tranny. FWIW, you should heel-n-toe every downshift too, but most people don't.

Sorry bout the hijack...now back to your regularly scheduled black-diamond-chat.
post #63 of 73
Somehow I knew this thread was going to digress into an East-coast vs. West coast, ice vs. powder debate.

Back to your regularly scheduled pissing match.

post #64 of 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phillycore View Post
I've heard that there are more injuries at Blue Mt. in Pa. than almost any other place in the U.S. There's a reason for it in addition to plainly just new skier visits. The snow quality is crap and it makes conditions downright insane at times, not to mention there are tons of people crammed into a small area..
I'll believe this. Burma Road is the scariest beginner trail ever.

Last time I skied Blue (XMas week about 5 years ago) I felt much safer on their double-blacks than on the Burma Road. I don't think you could pay me enough to ski Burma Road during XMas week again.
post #65 of 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wannabe View Post
Off topic, but...

Even with synchros double clutching is still something useful on downshifts, especially into 1st, to make them smoother, more stable, and cause less wear to your tranny. FWIW, you should heel-n-toe every downshift too, but most people don't.

Sorry bout the hijack...now back to your regularly scheduled black-diamond-chat.
hijack continued

heel toe yes, double clutching not really if you can rev match which is why you are heel toeing.

Plus who downshifts into first at speed ever, even if your autocrossing you never downshift into first.

If your heel toeing, double clutching is useless.....both do the same exact thing. that is sync up the input and output sides of the entire drivetrain.

trust me when I say this, I am slightly better than most people while driving a car. A quick search of my name and car I drove on google could prove that.
post #66 of 73
Scariest thing I ever skied was the access trail from a hotel in Les Arcs to the lift. Narrow, a sheet of ice, tight turns, and crammed with people. I saw someone helicoptered off that trail with a major head injury after losing it off a corner and into a tree. Happily he survived and was OK after a week in Grenoble hospital, but it was close...

Yup, beginner trails can be scary.
post #67 of 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA View Post
hijack continued

heel toe yes, double clutching not really if you can rev match which is why you are heel toeing.

Plus who downshifts into first at speed ever, even if your autocrossing you never downshift into first.

If your heel toeing, double clutching is useless.....both do the same exact thing. that is sync up the input and output sides of the entire drivetrain.
Incorrect. There are three things you need to match speeds on.

1) Input shaft
2) Output shaft
3) The gears

Heel-toe matches #1 and #2 but not #3. A synchro tranny helps match #3. If you've ever tried to downshift to 1st while still moving you've probably felt resistance in the gear shift lever...that is because you're pushing on the synchros and that pressure sort of gets translated into them trying to spin up the gear you're trying to mesh with. This wears the synchros out eventually (and since 2nd is one of the most commonly downshifted to gears, this is why 2nd is the first one that "goes out"). If you double clutch with a throttle blip you can bring up the gear speed without wearing the synchros. This is true of all downshifts, even from 6th to 5th.

You are also dead wrong on the lack of need to downshift into 1st in autocross (and other forms of racing as well). The nationally competitive S2000 autocross drivers largely downshift into 1st, even on National Tour courses. Some Lotus Elise drivers also go to 1st on some courses. It's a little less obvious in the case of the Elise...Matt Braun who won a national championship in the Elise almost never went to 1st on national level courses, but many local courses have slower corners. There are some cars that never even get OUT of 1st gear on an autocross course. I know of one guy who was paraplegic and drove a Corvette ZR1 extremely competively...one reason for his choice of a ZR1 was that 1st ran out to ~60 mph in that car. On many courses he never got out of 1st.

FWIW, even outside of autocross there are many road courses with corners where a car like a ZR1 or a Viper will want 1st gear leaving the slowest corners.

Shoot, I have a car that 1st runs out to 45mph...I go to 1st while moving almost every time I drive that car on the street, much less on a track or autocross course.

Quote:
trust me when I say this, I am slightly better than most people while driving a car. A quick search of my name and car I drove on google could prove that.
We could get into a penis waving contest about who's the better driver here, but we'd both just end up looking like fools with our privates hanging out.
post #68 of 73
This one time I frontpointed up the Y Couloir (Y'know, in LCC) and as I was waiting at the top for it to corn out it got cloudy and colder and windier. So I said "poop on this!" and skied the 3000 feet or so of rock-lined coral solo. And I only had one Whippet! And at the bottom I saw a bigfoot track. So there! I'm more gnar than any of you gapers.

Also - this one time I straightlined the bottom 1/4 of Suicide on Superior because I wanted to be like Shawn Farmer (yeah - I know - he straightlined Pinball Alley, not Suicide). I was great until I started windmilling down the apron. I saw some mountaingoat poop on that outing as well!
post #69 of 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by boboco View Post
Like I have said before I am just getting started and trying to hit the black diamonds consistently this year. Last year I hit Corona at Eldora and it was very easy compared with some of the blue runs in Vail (which is where will go the most this year). My question is Do you see alot of variations from resort to resort when it comes to the clasificcation of runs? The only place I have skied outside of colorado was Squaw and it seemed consistant with Vail but I just don't know how much it varies. I want to get a true perception of my development when I hit the slopes this season.
Does it really matter? When I ski, I rarely know what Snowbird rates the run as ( well when I ski on named runs ), I just ski ( and look for untracked powder, even if it's on a blue run ).
post #70 of 73
Here's the thing. You're at a mountain. You ski the blue, too boring, so you ski the black. If you want more you look for their double blacks. If you want more you look for the cliffs and back bowls beyond the ropes.

From what I can remember about skiing out west, the trail map might be marked, but it's not so easy to tell exactly where you are when you're on the mountain. All the snow covered trees look the same, and most runs end at the bottom anyway so why waist time figuring it out.
post #71 of 73
Big mountain blacks in the West are much more difficult then those of the East. The rating is relative to that particular area or even day! It's original intent was just a guideline for that specific resort. Consider the surrounding mountains to determine the difficulty. Alta, Whistler Blackcomb, Jackson Hole, Squaw, Big Sky... Europe!!!

Don't worry about where or what you're skiing. Your skills will improve with mileage. Remember, it's about having a great time and doing something that you love to do.

If you really need to know how you're doing, hire a pro and build a long-term relationship.

Happy sliding!
post #72 of 73
Mt Bohemian is the real deal...check out the color of the lift towers.

You don't ski S&S you jump in and hope you survive the landing....much bigger than Corbet. BTW S&S stands for locals Charlie Sands(whitewater raft company owner and all around grouch) and John Sims(inventor of the Crokie and more recently a metal sculptor)
post #73 of 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by Walt View Post
I'll believe this. Burma Road is the scariest beginner trail ever.

Last time I skied Blue (XMas week about 5 years ago) I felt much safer on their double-blacks than on the Burma Road. I don't think you could pay me enough to ski Burma Road during XMas week again.
Yes, the conditions matter the most! Black Bear, a blue run at Stratton that has several runs coming off of it, gave me a much greater challenge than the double blacks! And yes, that was just a short section to get to the harder runs...
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