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Footbeds & Fitting...

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 
Greetings,

I am trying to get some basic info and terminology correct before I go in for footbeds and fitting.

The main thing I am wondering is this...My shoes wear on the outsides badly...to the point I have to re-sole them or toss them out. The wear is greater on my outside right heel. Less, but similar on my left heel.


Whats that called?

Do I assume correctly that my inside edges have less weight on them than my outside edges due to the wear on the soles of my shoes?

Thanks for the help,

Eric
post #2 of 11
The wear on the outside edge of your shoes has a very technical term. I call it "wear on the outside edge of my heel".

Seriously not meaning to be smart. Natural foot movement during walking is this basically.

1. Heel strike on the outside (lateral side) of the heel.
2. Roll inward (evert) as foot goes flat (forefoot on ground).
3. Foot adapts to angle of terrain
4. Heel lifts as foot heads towards toeoff and foot inverts (rolls towards the outside (little toe).
5. Toe off


It is of course somewhat more complex but there is no need for a complete lesson in gait. Things to know are that skiing is not walking so a footbed made by an experienced person for skiing may be different than one made for walking. Especially if the one for walking is to address an injury.

There are experienced people out there that can tell more from looking at shoe wear patterns than I can. But simply knowing in this venue that you wear your shoes on the outside doesn't necessarily mean anything of vital importance.

Lou
post #3 of 11
Snofan,

As Lou elluded to, heel toe strike has little to do with skiing movements but your gaite may expose some issues that will help your boot fitter better align your boots.

IF YOU STRIKE ON THE OUTSIDE OF YOUR HEEL AND ROLL OFF THE BIG TOE SIDE:
You probably stand and walk more abducted (duck footed) on your right side so that your knee will track straight ahead when you walk. This is probably related to pronation. I am generalizing but seeing this may help your boot fitter post your footbeds accordingly to help correct this.

I don't know that this has anything to do with putting more weight on your inside or outside ski edge? It may contribute to an under-canted situation which would require you to create more angulation to get your edge to bite (skiing knock-kneed).

IF YOU STRIKE ON THE OUTSIDE OF YOUR HEEL AND ROLL OFF THE LITTLE TOE:
You may walk more toes in (pigeon toed) and supinate.

Both issues can be helped with a well made footbed. There may also be other boot adjustments ie: shaft adjustments, canting that will create a more balanced stance for you. Ideally you should be able to pressure your inside or outside edge with the same ease and balance.

Are you bow legged or knock kneed? Duck footed or pigeon toed?
post #4 of 11
Thread Starter 

Thank you Lou and Bud

Both of your replies helped me out.

I would guess that I am bow-legged and duck footed. When I walk on the trails around my home it is easy to see in my footprints that I am duck footed. Quack Quack!

I had a hamstring autograft ACL reconstruction nearly 7 months ago. In looking at my legs alot over the past few months, I notice that my lower legs curve inward ALOT. Lowers bowlegged anyway.

I put on my boots and when holding my feet a few inches apart, I look down and see my knees WAY inside. I flex and they line up with the toes of my boots.

If any of that means anything, please reply. I hope to get my boots fitted, maybe get liners...and get myself aligned and balanced on my skis. It will be the first time in 43 years of skiing.

Better late than never.

Eric
post #5 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by Snowfan View Post
Both of your replies helped me out.

I would guess that I am bow-legged and duck footed. When I walk on the trails around my home it is easy to see in my footprints that I am duck footed. Quack Quack!

I put on my boots and when holding my feet a few inches apart, I look down and see my knees WAY inside. I flex and they line up with the toes of my boots.

If any of that means anything, please reply. I hope to get my boots fitted, maybe get liners...and get myself aligned and balanced on my skis. It will be the first time in 43 years of skiing.

Better late than never.

Eric
Eric,

that doesn't sound like you are bow legged, duck footed yes but hey these things are academic...get yourself off to a good fitter who can assess this and help you get what you need, be it new boots or just adjustments to the ones you already have

having this type of alignment work done is a benefit after however many years skiing..plain and simple it is a benefit, now just see the best guy in your area or travel id required

good luck
post #6 of 11
Thread Starter 
Thanks Colin. I agree with your post.

I ski mainly at Telluride and Taos...Bootdoctors at both locations, along with several other fitters.

Any recommendations?
post #7 of 11
Boot doctors at telluride is probably the one ....now i had dinner with the guy form there last night and for the life of me can't think of his name right now..it will come to me
post #8 of 11
CEM believe you are talking about Bob Gleason.

Lou
post #9 of 11
lou,

yep that the man.....the embarssesing thing is that i had dinner with him the nigt before i posted the info
post #10 of 11
See Bob Gleason in Telluride, or Charlie Bradley in Taos.

jim
post #11 of 11
CEM I'm there every day a regular customer walks in the store and I can only remember their face. We talk for an hour about whatever, and I look at their name on the credit card as they are leaving.

Probably they know my game when the first time I've actually called them by name is when they are leaving.

Lou
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