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Pre season drills ~ who's got 'em?

post #1 of 29
Thread Starter 
I stay considerably active in the summer, which keeps me in shape, but I'm looking for some kind of drills or dry land exercises that I can do that may translate to my skiing when I'm ready to hit the slopes.
post #2 of 29
http://www.crossfit.com/

Trekchick,
This is all you will ever need!! Even if you follow just some of the workouts this will enhance balance,agility,strength,power,endurance and stamina!

Check out the videos.They are very useful in learning proper form!


T
post #3 of 29
Thread Starter 
Tcarey, I'm looking at the link which has a tremendous amount of videos and demos, and it seems like a great program, but the video library isn't very easy to navigate, to sort out useful excercises. Are there any in particular that you recommend?
post #4 of 29
After knee surgery and a long rehab, I actually skied better last season than I had in the past, and attribute that to the exercises I learned that really get you focused on doing exercises in balance.

Have you used a Bosu ball before? If you haven't almost any exercise you can do while standing becomes that much harder on the Bosu ball.

One exercise I like a lot on the Bosu ball is a movement very similar to a skiing movement. Stand on one side of the Bosu ball (flat side is on the ground) with the leg closest to the ball resting lightly on the middle of the ball. Using the leg on the ground to flex and extend, transfer your position from one side of the ball to the other without putting an excessive amount of weight on the ball at anytime.

As you speed the movement up, it can feel quite a bit like you are making short radius turns (except for the fact you're not really turning the legs).

Make sense?

Mike
post #5 of 29
TC, I hate doing exercises, so for me, cross country running, especially in dry creekbeds or in fields where cows have been recently (some have easier access than others), is the ticket. I believe this is called broken-field running and it's great for agility.
post #6 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trekchick View Post
Tcarey, I'm looking at the link which has a tremendous amount of videos and demos, and it seems like a great program, but the video library isn't very easy to navigate, to sort out useful excercises. Are there any in particular that you recommend?

TC,
Yes the sight is very large and there is a huge database of workouts and exercises.Most of the workouts that Crossfit does are high intensity using exercises that are multi-jointed,like the basic squat and deadlift.
Personally I love to squat sometimes heavy sometimes for reps.I like box jumps for explosive power and deadlift for total body and core.Pullups,pushups and dips for upper body strength.
Other than skiing itself it is hard to pinpoint and exercise that will transfer to skiing.Get outside run,jump and play!!

T
post #7 of 29
Thread Starter 
Well all, this has been enlightening and helpful.
Mike, it does make sense. The Bosu ball not only helps with balance but it forces you to engage your core which is essential to skiing well.

Joan, you got me pegged. I absolutely hate indoor exercise and only have done it when it was the only alternative. I'm not a runner, but I think that running in the virgin woods behind my house will definitely help me with the kind of fitness that can transfer to the slopes.

Tcary, my dear friend. You know me too well...........Get outside in deed.
I went in the yard last night and got on my SS bike, to practice bunny hops. I did this for the joy of biking, but started to relate it to skiing. I think you have something there.

I'll still look at the videos on crossfit, but that site is overwhelming at the moment.

Thanks all...........Keep 'em coming!
post #8 of 29
Here is a list of exercises that I use to get ready for the ski season:

Visit your local butcher and pay $30 to sit in the walk-in freezer for half an hour. Afterwards, burn two $50 dollar bills to warm up.

Soak your ski gloves and store them in the freezer after every use.

Fasten a small, wide rubber band around the top half of your head before you go to bed each night.

If you wear glasses, begin wearing them with glue smeared on the lenses.

Throw away a one-hundred dollar bill now.

Find the nearest ice rink and walk across the ice 20 times in your ski boots carrying two pairs of skis, an accessory bag and poles. Pretend you are looking for your car. Drop things on a random basis.

Place a small but sharp pebble in your shoes. Line your shoes with crushed ice. Now tighten a c-clamp around your toes.

Buy a new pair of gloves and immediately throw one of them away.

Secure one of your ankles to a bed post and ask a friend to run into you at high speed.

Go to McDonald’s and insist on paying $8.50 for a hamburger. Be sure you get into the longest line.

Clip a lift ticket to the zipper of your jacket and ride a motorcycle fast enough to make the ticket inflict multiple lacerations on your exposed face.

Drive slowly for five hours – anywhere – just so long as it’s in a snowstorm and you’re following an eighteen-wheeler.

Fill a blender with ice, hit the pulse button and let the spray blast your face. Leave the ice on your face until it melts. Let it drip down your collar and into your clothes.

Dress up in as many clothes as you can and then proceed to take them all off because you have to go to the bathroom.

Slam your thumb in a car door. Don’t go see a Doctor.

Repeat all of the above every Saturday and Sunday until ski season.

Sorry, couldn't resist.
post #9 of 29
Hmmm...
  • Do something aerobic like running, biking, etc.
  • Strength training: for power and joint stability, give the kids a piggyback ride.
  • plyometrics: for explosive power, especially bounding through obstacle courses, jumping up on the park tables, hopping from rock to rock while hiking, etc.
  • footwork drills: like hop scotch, running through a ladder.
  • reaction training: Playing tag, waterballoon fights, using a reaction ball.
  • Balancing: balance on balance discs, exercise balls, skating.
  • Purtubation exercises: when you can balance on the exercise ball, try catching a medicine ball, or play soccer/hockey/anything where you need to move while someone is pushing or pulling on you.
If you do most of that you will be quite ready for the ski season, after you take a long nap. GO PLAY OUTSIDE AND DON'T BE AFRAID TO ACT LIKE A KID AGAIN.
post #10 of 29
O.K., So we're not kids anymore...
...Periodization and a full year plan of different activities is how the top athletes train. The only rule I can think of is to have a lot of fun. Way too many people get in an exercise rut by not varying their routine, and making their activities fun.
post #11 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by nolo View Post
TC, I hate doing exercises, so for me, cross country running, especially in dry creekbeds or in fields where cows have been recently (some have easier access than others), is the ticket. I believe this is called broken-field running and it's great for agility.
Nolo, I hope you remove your shoes before coming in the house??


Trekchick,

I personally like to crush ping pong balls between my buttock cheeks to strengthen my fear muscles. This also helps with a watertight seal in the unlikely event of a water landing!
post #12 of 29
Thread Starter 
Justanotherskipro, I like your ideas. I do happen to mtbike and though I don't have kids, I know what you mean about the hop scotch kinda thing.
Being an out doorsy kinda girl, I find activity type drills much more effective, and easy to stick with than regimented routines.

Bud, I'm gonna get me some ping pong balls.
Will I be able to work my way up to golf balls?
post #13 of 29
Gonna get yerself a better grip on the saddle too!!
post #14 of 29
I believe golf balls are an admirable goal but may tend to leave dimples?

Beginners should start with eggs!

Let me know how that goes grasshopper!
post #15 of 29
Thread Starter 
Kneale, you have something there. Cross training for the Butt Clenchers!

Bud, I won't be posting video for Movement Analysis
post #16 of 29
That's OK... hey, if you need some balls just let me know! I can loan you some
post #17 of 29
I'd like to step back across the line. thank you
post #18 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by bud heishman View Post
That's OK... hey, if you need some balls just let me know! I can loan you some
If the drills work, they will be of no use when I'm done.
post #19 of 29
True, guess I should have said "donated" instead of "loan".

This gives me a great idea for some aprez skiing entertainment at one of the ESA's! We should get a gang together to have some cocktails and play "A**hole golf" where you set up holes (plastic cups) and have relay races with pennies clinched between the cheeks and run across the room and try to deposit the penny into the cup.

We could be team captains Trek!
post #20 of 29
Thread Starter 
Bud, you owe me a screen cleaning!
I'm sure this would be a great exercise to improve the core muscle groups.
How do you know of this drill? I've never heard of it. Since you're a professional ski instructor as well as a boot fitter extraordinaire, you must know what you're talking about.

Since I'm not familiar with this drill, I'll be happy to be the videographer, and hopefully learn something.
post #21 of 29
Sorry Trisha, this game is played with clothes on! and if it wasn't there would be no cameras allowed! I am shy you know


Is this what they mean by anal retentive?
post #22 of 29

A fitness tip from evil rusty

Trek,

Find the hilliest course in your area and play golf!

Walking. And carrying - no push carts. Take short cuts through the high grass and the woods (to challenge your balance). Stop to pick up balls and trash (standing back up with your bag on will tax your legs). But keep up with your cart buddies (works aerobics). Carry extra weight in your bag (a spare water bottle works - you're going to need it - but get in the habit of drinking from the bottle at the station and immediately refilling it). Fix extra divots on the greens but keep your back straight while doing it.
post #23 of 29
Thread Starter 
R, that will do wonders for my ski fitness, but I'll be too exhausted to golf well, eh?
post #24 of 29
That's why it's an "evil Rusty" tip. You do have to have your priorities straight.

As with any fitness regimen, you need to start easy and then ramp up the intensity as you go. If this regimen makes you too exhausted, it's easy to tone it down by only playing nine, carrying less weight, picking up less stuff, using a push cart, etc. You should have some "benchmark" holes where the length of the walk or the steepness has you breathing hard (but not as hard as running) and your heart rate elevated. The benchmark is how long it takes to get your heart rate down before you hit your shot. Hitting shots with an elevated heart rate should reduce accuracy of the shot - so we don't want to do that. When you get to the point where it takes less than a minute to get your heart rate back down, it's time to ramp it up a little more.

Depending on your handicap, how brutal the course is and how out of shape you are, you could see your "fitness" rounds be 3-6 strokes higher on average than your "riding" rounds. On flatter, busier courses you may find that a fitness round improves your scores. A lot of folks play hurry up and wait golf. They drive up to their ball and then wait for the course to clear before they can take their next shot. When they do nothing while they are waiting, they get tense, stiff and frustrated. When your walking, it's much more likely that you will only have a short wait and that you will be better able to maintain a consistent swing rhythm and stay in the "flow".
post #25 of 29
TC, Do you blade? Kent Rychel (ex US team racer and race coach for CBA) once told me his version of weight lifting was to put sixty pounds of rocks in his backpack and do a lot of uphill skating. Since he was coaching a lot of junior racers he needed to simultaneously work on his training while working with the kids. That was the beginning of my attitude about not just thinking young, we need to do playful activities like a kid. Remember the days of having more fun with the box than the toy that came in the box? IMO far too many of us get self-absorbed about acting our age and we quit having fun when we work out. Then we find ourselves unable to do simple movements that were once so very easy. A program I saw on the tube recently brags about it's efficacy because it incorportate changing up their regimine every few weeks. Which is a step in the right direction but IMO it is still pretty regimented. Play needs to be a bit more spontaneous IMO. Come to think of it, when was the last time we did some actual "play" training? What would some of those activities include in your pre season workout regimine?
post #26 of 29
Thread Starter 
Holy crap, are you trying to help me get in shape or are you trying to kill me?


I'm mostly mtbiking, and golfing. By the time we ski, I'll be shoveling sidewalks for our commercial plow accounts, which means shoveling/snowblowing, from 3 AM to 8 AM every time it snows.
post #27 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trekchick View Post
Holy crap, are you trying to help me get in shape or are you trying to kill me?


I'm mostly mtbiking, and golfing. By the time we ski, I'll be shoveling sidewalks for our commercial plow accounts, which means shoveling/snowblowing, from 3 AM to 8 AM every time it snows.
Now that sounds like a fun way to start your day.
post #28 of 29
Thread Starter 
Kneale, you wanna arm wrestle?
You could take me right now, but by mid December my arms are fairly buff. I could take you then!
post #29 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by tcarey View Post
http://www.crossfit.com/

Trekchick,
This is all you will ever need!! Even if you follow just some of the workouts this will enhance balance,agility,strength,power,endurance and stamina!

Check out the videos.They are very useful in learning proper form!


T
Tcarey, you'll be happy to know that I started my Adult co-ed volleyball season last night. I did some of the volleyball drills as shown in the crossfit library, and was thinking, "wow, this really can translate to balance in skiing"
Then I jammed my thumb on the volleyball and tore the tendon!
Thanks for messing up my thumb!
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