EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › What ski would you choose if your life depended on it?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

What ski would you choose if your life depended on it? - Page 4

post #91 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by volantaddict View Post
Now, now, don't get yer BVDs in a bundle. Just because you think Doug Coombs skiing sixty degree spines is safer/easier than me skiing not even fifty degree corn, and I find that laughable, is no reason to resort to insulting my appearance. You might get an infraction from the epic police.

Your pride is getting the best of you Richie, there was never any call for you to appraise skiing that you don't engage in, your frustration is of your own creation.

--------------------

If I was skiing those spines, I'd definitely want my Hucksters on, they were built for that sort of exposure, but I don't know that I'm ready for that level of skiing, that takes certainty, and I'm just not there yet.
Corn???!!!! it that what the quarries call rocks nowadays?.....listen man....I can only go by the picture you post. I have not been there, nor is there any indication of the scale of what we are talking about here. So what I see in that photo is a rock strewn patch better suited for a burro or rock crawler than a skier. If there is more to that photo than I can see...fine, then say so or post a picture illustrating it. But for you and the other red-necks to jump down my throat for stating the obvious and for commenting on what for most skiers consider unskiable (lets be honest crap, if you have a need to ski that seek help or at least find a supplemental hobby in the off season).....I ain't gonna sit back and take it. Like I said, though I have not done it, aside from avalanche concerns, I have no fears of jumping down a soft and billowy snowy mountain of any steepness and or length.
post #92 of 118
You insist on not getting it. Don't get steep. Don't get powder. Or things like slurpees, tree wells, sloughs, etc., etc. Maybe not even ice...

You & maybe some others are putting a pretty funny spin on http://forums.epicski.com/showthread.php?t=72725 I'm just sayin'
post #93 of 118
Oh man, Simon with the Better off Dead for great justice...and Highway Star is back? In a dickwaving thread no less? Truly epic.

Harry: I don't think the GS ski thing is so crazy. 190ish skis with 27 meter shapes? Predictable, been skiing on them since I was a kid? What is wrong with that. Oh, and they always have metal bindings that go to infinity. And yeah, I've skied stuff where falling would hurt like dead, but I have to be honest and admit that I probably take more real risk on the ascents.
post #94 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by spindrift View Post
You insist on not getting it. Don't get steep. Don't get powder. Or things like slurpees, tree wells, sloughs, etc., etc. Maybe not even ice...

You & maybe some others are putting a pretty funny spin on http://forums.epicski.com/showthread.php?t=72725 I'm just sayin'
Steeps I get and welcome.....rocks I get in my rock crawler Jeep. Trees, yeah great for fall foliage, firewood, building materials, syrup, and to hide behind while hunting....or die if you like to ski as fast as I do. Powder, looks wonderful, heavenly even, (no pun intended) unfortunately I have little to no experience in it...but I can tell you this much, had I been skiing in powder I would never have broken my back or thumb....thats where carving on hard packed ice comes in....you know at 50-60mph...oh right you might not know. That's ok. You're a skier so you're alright with me.
post #95 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richie-Rich View Post
Corn???!!!!.....listen man....I can only go by the picture you post. I have not been there, nor is there any indication of the scale of what we are talking about here. So what I see in that photo is a rock strewn patch better suited for a burro or rock crawler than a skier. If there is more to that photo than I can see...fine, then say so or post a picture illustrating it. But for you and the other red-necks to jump down my throat for stating the obvious and for commenting on what for most skiers consider unskiable (lets be honest crap, if you have a need to ski that seek help or at least find a supplemental hobby in the off season).....I ain't gonna sit back and take it. Like I said, though I have not done it, aside from avalanche concerns, I have no fears of jumping down a soft and billowy snowy mountain of any steepness and or length.
In this picture the red X is where the looking down shot was taken:
.


Since I pointed the camera straight down the fall line for the shot from above, it is overlooking rocks rather than the vast expanse of corny snow off to skier's left. The skis in the above shot block the view of the exit between the rocks. It was not the big deal that you are making of it, yet you have chosen to ignore what Bob said about the terrain in question, and what I have described, in favor of your erroneous exaggerations. Why?
post #96 of 118
Looks like someone hit the one to looker's right too...
post #97 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by volantaddict View Post
In this picture the red X is where the looking down shot was taken:
.


Since I pointed the camera straight down the fall line for the shot from above, it is overlooking rocks rather than the vast expanse of corny snow off to skier's left. The skis in the above shot block the view of the exit between the rocks. It was not the big deal that you are making of it, yet you have chosen to ignore what Bob said about the terrain in question, and what I have described, in favor of your erroneous exaggerations. Why?
I take Bob's word to heart....he, unlike many online, is here to talk about skiing and not to do online battle (it even sounds stupid). That being said, I googled the place in question and while I did find out that it is very steep for a brief section, it is moderate the rest of the way. What I also saw was that this location gets plenty of snow, and when people usually ski it, it is usually completely covered in snow. The photo you shared which is the root of this entire debacle, does not afford the viewer that discretion. So if nothing else it is your withholding of the information which only now you make lucid that has led us down this path of disparity. Perhaps to make yourself appear slightly more "core" than you really are.
post #98 of 118
...continue. Please...
post #99 of 118
There seem to be a lot of people here criticizng VA's choice of terrain. Because of avalanche danger it is generally not possible to ski 35+ degree chutes in winter in the Rockies, but come spring when the snowpack becomes isothermic with the melt freeze cycle penetrating all the way through it gets rock solid and safe for limited day light periods. The trick is to kick step up in your boots while it is frozen and ski it when the top 3"-6" is softened by the sun. If you are too soon (or the clouds come in) it is frozen solid, too late and and the snow gets rotten so you punch through to the rocks underneath. The cycle repeats every day. Often the window of really good and safe skiing conditions is less than an hour, and you have to judge it on a long run starting when the top is a little too hard and the bottom a little too soft. From what I can tell VA is a very adept backcountry skier who timed his decent for the safest and best conditions. If you are good enough to hit it just right, what he did is not crazy, it is backcountry skiing at its finest, and it didn't cost him a dime. My hat's off to you VA. Well played yourself.
post #100 of 118
Race Room (05/06) Legend Pro. pretty of edge hold and wide enough not to get kick around in the crud or funky snow you might run into.
post #101 of 118
Wow.

This thread is positively shitastic. Aim away from the snow while dick waving during the pissing contest, please...
post #102 of 118
The ones with the most recent tune up.

Other things considered I'd take my Coombas - never had a problem with them on ice and they are obviously brilliant on powder. But to echo a message above....if I thought there was a chance of 2000' of ice I'd avoid it. Couple of Dutch guys died on the backside of MontFort in Verbier last season after making that mistake.
post #103 of 118
I can hardly believe I'm saying this, but I agree with Jer. 180 explosivs.

(I take responsibility for throwing the bait out to steer this one into the chute, I guess I might as well throw it back on).
post #104 of 118

Looking down the Hourglass on Tremor. Blackcomb backcountry.


No hoppy turns. Follow the nice archs back up to the top.


Better view of the line and exposure from the top of Decker.

Skied on old third hand CMH 180 Explosives and Fritschi Explores with no brakes. Conditions were firm almost ice with thin dusting on top.

Current ski's I'd pick for the same mission, are Movement 187 Thunders, PM Gear Bro 188, and Legend Pro's (bit heavy for the touring side to get there). Pretty much any ski with a nice stiff flex pattern and amazing torsional rigidity.

Most of the "steep" skiing with true exposure does not get skied in deep powder so you don't have to worry about float. Alot of the really big stuff you see that gets skied on film in Alaska or BC does not have near the type of exposure that would be considered "fall you die" like they have in Chamonix. Few spots in the world other than Cham or La Grave do people regularly ski lines over really serious no fall zones.
post #105 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by shirk_007 View Post

Looking down the Hourglass on Tremor. Blackcomb backcountry.
post #106 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by shirk
Current ski's I'd pick for the same mission, are Movement 187 Thunders, PM Gear Bro 188, and Legend Pro's (bit heavy for the touring side to get there). Pretty much any ski with a nice stiff flex pattern and amazing torsional rigidity.
Me too buddy. I havent read this entire thread, but I also agree with whomever mentioned Explosiv's as well.

The only time I've been in a situation where I verbally told myself "DONT FALL" was in Las Lenas, ARG a few years ago. Me and some buds were skiing the Marte Chair and we were looking to ski a run called Parrot Chute...which is basically a 40 degree-ish 1000 vert longish chute that twists and turns a bit but basically just opens up into a wide open bowl at the bottom.

However, there are many entrances to other chutes along the ridgetop where Parrot Chute was located and we ended up dropping into a chute that was adjacent to Parrot by mistake. This chute was called "Sin Salida" which translates to "Without Exit".

Here is Sin Salida from a distance:


The top was a fairly mellow 35 - 40 degree wide chute, but about 2/3rds down, there's a rollover that you can't quite see from the top, and below the rollover it steepens to about 50 degrees and leads straight down to a mandatory 40 - 50ft air. The air this particular year was unlaunchable, so you had to ski down to the top of the air, and then find a billy-goat traverse through some rocks into an adjacent chute.

We were halfway down Sin Salida when we realized we were in wrong chute. And I gave myself the "whatever you do don't fall here" talking too...heh.

I was skiing on a pair of 188 Bro Models. Part of the design criteria for this ski was actually excellence in situations such as these. When it gets steep, scratchy, and you don't want to fall...you want a ski that is fairly straight so you can get full edge contact with the snow without the ski "bowing" too much into it's natural sidecut causing the tips and tails to hang up. This also make it eaiser to skid & slide in a controlled manner if you're in a spot where you can't make a turn or get the tips around in a hop turn. Also, it has a decent amount of tip-to-tail taper (i.e. about 11mm...I would call anything greater or equal to 10mm as a 'decent amount') which lets you release the tail of the ski pretty easily. Also, it's a pretty torsionally stiff ski, so when you're standing on that uphill ski and your downhill ski is kind of hanging in space...you have some confidence that you're not on a noodly ski that's going to wash out on you. It also has a slight twintip that again, allows the tails to release easily and has the added benefit of allowing you to back up easily if you have to without the tail digging into the slope or getting stuck on any rocks that might be poking up. Although, there have been guides in Chamonix call us up and request that we make them a Bro Model with a flat tail so that they can more easily jam the ski into the snow to use it as an anchor in belay situations.

But that's what I'm comfortable on. Everyone is different. Someone might be more comfortable on a pair of GS skis because that just might be what they ski everyday. What it boils down to IMO is that despite all the criteria I listed above, the best ski for the situation is probably the one that the user is most accustomed to and comfortable on.
post #107 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tyrone Shoelaces View Post
Although, there have been guides in Chamonix call us up and request that we make them a Bro Model with a flat tail so that they can more easily jam the ski into the snow to use it as an anchor in belay situations.
I haven't ever used my skis to belay off, but the ability to secure a ski into the snow is a big issue.

Often the worst point of a ski descent is when you stop ascending and have to click in. The pack has to come off the back, the skis have to come out, be secured in the snow and the pack goes back on, then you need to align the skis and get in them, all while balancing in your kick steps. It's nice to be able to pull a ski out and jam the tail in hard to least secure that part of the process.

It's also nice to find mountain goat tracks to use as a platform, but that's another story.
post #108 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by Harry_Morgan View Post

Often the worst point of a ski descent is when you stop ascending and have to click in. The pack has to come off the back, the skis have to come out, be secured in the snow and the pack goes back on, then you need to align the skis and get in them, all while balancing in your kick steps. It's nice to be able to pull a ski out and jam the tail in hard to least secure that part of the process.
.
agreed. The sketchiest moments for me skiing have probably been in those exact situations. The threat of avalanches is probably always my biggest fear factor in skiing, but what you describe above is probably my #2. It's always a high pucker moment for me that is for sure...so I always I try to go out of my way to avoid that situation, but sometimes, it happens.
post #109 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richie-Rich View Post
So if nothing else it is your withholding of the information which only now you make lucid that has led us down this path of disparity.
I guess the three different camera angles weren't sufficient for you.
post #110 of 118
Good posts- VA, Bob, Tyrone and 007- it's useful and interesting stuff, once you get past the BS. And VA- I think jeans are absolutely mandatory in these situations. I (and most skiers) don't ski this stuff, but do ski places where a fall would be highly inconvenient and could end in a hospital. I liked what Bob said about the IM 88- one of my favorite skis that I never bought. Confidence inspiring in sketchy situations is a good description. Interesting about the Coomba, too, although that seems light... In my quiver, I go for the 179 Bro (soft version, so I can bend it). I've had it out in about everything and it's best as an all around "whatever is out there ski" (it's also my go to pow ski, although with the addition of Goats this year, that may change). In steep stuff, I can just stand on it and hang out into space and I know it'll hold and come around. I mostly stick to steeps that don't involve cliffs, however.
post #111 of 118
I think I'll go for the old flame 195cm Dynastar 4X4 verticals (1999ish). They were called all-mountain in the old days but have the width and sidecut of a modern GS Ski.

Ik would chouse them because they are rugged, hold their edge pretty well and because I have got a lot of mileage on those ski's and they feel comfortable to me. There should be look P12's or P14's on them. And they should be in better shape than the ones I have in the barn.

My race stock speed course comps have an identical sidecut and width but are not as rugged as the 4X4's. That's why I would go for the 4X4's
post #112 of 118
Tyrone:

Was that picture taken from the top of The Necklace?

http://www.outyo.com/cache/gallery_4...jpg_640_0_.png
post #113 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by mudfoot View Post
Tyrone:

Was that picture taken from the top of The Necklace?

http://www.outyo.com/cache/gallery_4...jpg_640_0_.png
Not quite from the top, but from on the way up. Good eye...

post #114 of 118
Thread Starter 
Shall I start new thread on bindings? Best I've used to get into and hold are Mojo 15's. Worst for getting into or if you lose a ski are Look/Rossi etc..
post #115 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by Harry_Morgan View Post
Just out of curiosity...how many of you have ever skied a no-fall line?

I've skied a few. Certainly gets your heart pounding. I've also turned away from a few no fall lines when I could not ascertain the snow conditions. There's no shame in hiking out or turning around so you can live to ski another day.
post #116 of 118
Nice pic Tyrone. Oh, what I wouldn't give to be standing there right now!

http://www.outyo.com/cache/gallery_4...jpg_640_0_.png
post #117 of 118
If my life depended on it? Hmmmmmmmm?

Something old .... like from The Olin Coropration ..

When they owned Winchester Repeating Arms .. ?

I could ski that stuff!

If I was real high and VA was behind me and put a foot up my adz!
post #118 of 118
GS skis get mostly everything done for me, well, the 180s at least. Soft like a slalom ski, and yet can hold well when under pressure. Length helps the float too.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ski Gear Discussion
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › What ski would you choose if your life depended on it?