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Volkl AC 50 vs. 12 Foot Tigershark vs. AC 30

post #1 of 24
Thread Starter 
I am having a very tough time deciding which of these 3 skis to choose from. I am 5'11, 185 lbs., extremely athletic and aggressive skier, very fast as well. I ski in the North East USA and Quebec. I like to ski the whole mountain, so that means ripping the groomers whether they are icy or not, bumps, shortish turns, long sweeping GS or Super GS turns, and if I am lucky enough to have a powder day, I will be off in the trees or O.B.. I do like to ski at Jay Peak and Stowe, as well, Mont Tremblant, Mont Ste. Marie and the other local ski hills near my hometown of Ottawa, Ontario. May you give me any feedback please ? I am leaning towards the 12 foot Tigershark.
post #2 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by robruf View Post
I am having a very tough time deciding which of these 3 skis to choose from. I am 5'11, 185 lbs., extremely athletic and aggressive skier, very fast as well. I ski in the North East USA and Quebec. I like to ski the whole mountain, so that means ripping the groomers whether they are icy or not, bumps, shortish turns, long sweeping GS or Super GS turns, and if I am lucky enough to have a powder day, I will be off in the trees or O.B.. I do like to ski at Jay Peak and Stowe, as well, Mont Tremblant, Mont Ste. Marie and the other local ski hills near my hometown of Ottawa, Ontario. May you give me any feedback please ? I am leaning towards the 12 foot Tigershark.
Tigersharks are very maneuverable skis, but I don't think they would handle bumps well. Nor would any other ski on your list. Have you considered a ski such as the Bridge or Karma? Both will give you the float you will want (well... enough float) and they do quite well on the groomers around here. I would consider looking into them or going with a 2 pair quiver instead of one because the Tigersharks are exceptional skis, but they wont handle the bumps and powder as well as a ski like the Bridge would do.
post #3 of 24
the 12' tigershark would probably be your best bet for skiing where you are.

i am from ottawa originally as well..by the time you get the ac 50s up to the speed they need to be to turn youll already be halfway back to ottawa from chelsea..hahaha

see if you can demo the 12' with the power switch...some people find it useless, but i found it to be quite noticeable, especially on the harder pack snow that we get in ont. and quebec
post #4 of 24
Not so sure you'd like the Tigersharks in icy bumps like you get there although they'd rock for everything else. The AC50's are flexier, better in bumps, better in mixed conditions, and in the shorter lengths (think about 170) surprisingly quick (only 16.something rad). But IMO, none of these are really suitable for your list. I'd go for something like an Elan Ti 78 or a Blizzard 8.1, frankly. Both are quick, ice skates, have enough flex to handle moderate bumps and light crud/powder.
post #5 of 24
Of the skis on your list, all are good on hard snow, all are good in GS/SG turns. However, none are particularly good in bumps, shorter turns and powdah. You are going to have sacrifice one end of the spectrum or the other or accept a ski that had medium capabilities in all the conditions you mention but is not stellar in any. The powerswitch option on the Tigersharks is a useful and effective option. (It does not however, make a dramatic difference, but rather a more subtle one)

Among more conventional (directional) skis, the Nordica Afterburner or Atomic Crimson come to mind as good choices. If you wished to consider a twin tip then the Volkl Bridge would be a good choice.

SJ
post #6 of 24
We sound similar. I'm a couple inches taller and about 15lbs heavier. I'm an aggressive North easter as well and have been contemplating the same three skiis. I think I'm going with the AC50's.
post #7 of 24
You should look into the new Blizzard magnum 8.7 as well if your considering the AC50, alot of people say it kills the AC50... ALso look into the Dynastar contact 4x4.. I have a pair of Tigershark 10's w/switch and they are NOT very good in bumps, one mistake and look out , especially if it's steep...
post #8 of 24
I too was contemplating this decision, but decided I could not get what I wanted in one ski.

I went with a GS ski for the cold fast groomer days.

I am now trying to figure out what is best for the glades/east coast powder days, at places like Stowe and Jay Peak.

I am leaning towards a Head iM82, or possibly something wider.

If I had to choose one ski it would probably have been a Fischer Progressor 9, but I know it would have been hell in the glades.
post #9 of 24
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the input fellow bears, I was talking with my local ski store and he told me that for the majority of the skiing that I do the Tigershark 12 foot is my best option, he said that the AC series, either the 30 or the 50 works best out West where they get alot more snow. He said that if I do go out West then I should rent the Grizzly's or something similar to that ski. He tried the Grizzly's here on the east coast last year and said they were awful for our type of snow, re: artificial and hardpack. But out west they were awesome. When the ski mags do their tests at Snowbird, the hardpack there is not enought close to the hardpack at Tremblant or Mont Ste. Marie when it hasn't snowed in 3 weeks time. I am looking at other manufacturers as well, especially Blizzard and Kastle, however, they are very far and few between. Of those skis, I am looking at the Supersonic IQ and the MX78, which ones would you choose. There is a special edition of the Supersonic, it looks awesome, check it out on Blizzard's international site, not the US site, it is all black and very clean looking. I phoned Blizzard Canada and they did not import any of these into the country, does anyone know where I could get them without having to do ship them from overseas? Thanks for your assistance with my decisions so far
post #10 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by skier2369 View Post
I too was contemplating this decision, but decided I could not get what I wanted in one ski.

I went with a GS ski for the cold fast groomer days.

I am now trying to figure out what is best for the glades/east coast powder days, at places like Stowe and Jay Peak.

I am leaning towards a Head iM82, or possibly something wider.

If I had to choose one ski it would probably have been a Fischer Progressor 9, but I know it would have been hell in the glades.
You may want to look into this option, might save you some $$ and will suit both situations much better. That and if you are looking for a pair of fast GS boards, I have a pair I'm trying to sell off on ebay.
post #11 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rise To The Top View Post
You may want to look into this option, might save you some $$ and will suit both situations much better. That and if you are looking for a pair of fast GS boards, I have a pair I'm trying to sell off on ebay.
Which ski will suit both situation much better?
post #12 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by skier2369 View Post
Which ski will suit both situation much better?
Mid-Fat twintip for Powder, bumps, and somewhat short turns (depends on the ski and lenght), and GS skis for the long fast turns on hardpack when powder is no around (majority of the time in the northeast).
post #13 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rise To The Top View Post
Mid-Fat twintip for Powder, bumps, and somewhat short turns (depends on the ski and lenght), and GS skis for the long fast turns on hardpack when powder is no around (majority of the time in the northeast).
Yep, my plan exactly.

I think I decided on im78's in 177 and Fischer GS's in 188.

I could have went fatter, but I want something with a low radius and a little soft and I think the 78's will be fine for east coast powder.
post #14 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by SierraJim View Post
Of the skis on your list, all are good on hard snow, all are good in GS/SG turns. However, none are particularly good in bumps, shorter turns and powdah. You are going to have sacrifice one end of the spectrum or the other or accept a ski that had medium capabilities in all the conditions you mention but is not stellar in any. The powerswitch option on the Tigersharks is a useful and effective option. (It does not however, make a dramatic difference, but rather a more subtle one)



SJ
I agree w/ Jim here, none of these skis are good on bumps or powder because they are fairly stiff. The K2 Xplorer might be a viable option too. The Head Monster 82 should be on your short list too.
post #15 of 24
Save some money.
Buy a left-over GS ski for high-speed crusing around eastern hills. There were plenty of Fischer and Atomic available on e-bay last time I looked.

Buy a bargain slalom carver or citizen race slalom ski, like my Fischer WC SC, for short turns and make it work in icy bumps.

Rent a specialized tool for out west, or wait for a bargain mid fat for those few and far between storm days.

I practice what I preach. My Quiver: 208 cm Kästle SG (a little over-kill for Ontario skiing), 188 cm Volkl P50 F1 ( to replace SG in Ontario needs bindings), 165 cm Fischer WC SC, 190 cm Volant Machete G.
post #16 of 24
How about: Blizzard 8.7 with 5.14's and a pair of supersonic's? You can but one flat and just swap out the binding?
post #17 of 24
post #18 of 24
I would suggest a few skis that have been mentioned before:

Blizzard 8.1/8.7 Magnum, lighter and livelier than any of the Volkls you listed...and more fun, check with ptex1 for good selection and $$s

Head iM 78

Nordica afterbirner/nitrous

Mazda Miata, oops
post #19 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post
I agree w/ Jim here, none of these skis are good on bumps or powder because they are fairly stiff. The K2 Xplorer might be a viable option too. The Head Monster 82 should be on your short list too.
Head Monster's I can see.

But, K2's for hard conditions?

I haven't skied them in years. Then, K2's seriously lacked oomph and edge grip.
post #20 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by 1SDSKIER View Post
You should look into the new Blizzard magnum 8.7 as well if your considering the AC50, alot of people say it kills the AC50... ALso look into the Dynastar contact 4x4.. I have a pair of Tigershark 10's w/switch and they are NOT very good in bumps, one mistake and look out , especially if it's steep...
I bought the AC50's so I'm a bit defensive here.

Reviews on Epic gave high grades to the AC50, but a few preferred the 8.7's (Dawgcatching). I don't recall anyone saying either killed the other.

The mag reviews (Skiing, Skipressworld, Peter Keelty's "Expert Skier"), ranked the AC50 higher in most categories.

Undoubtedly, both are great skis.
post #21 of 24
Quote:
He tried the Grizzly's here on the east coast last year and said they were awful for our type of snow, re: artificial and hardpack. But out west they were awesome.
you know what they say about opinions eh? heheheh

i skied the grizzly at craigleith in ontario...doesnt get much more hardpacked and artifical than that. i loved them. easily one of my favourite skis of all time.
post #22 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by Captain_Strato View Post
Head Monster's I can see.

But, K2's for hard conditions?

I haven't skied them in years. Then, K2's seriously lacked oomph and edge grip.
The more you ask a ski to do, the less it will do well. If you haven't skied the K2 in years, that might cloud your judgement in dissing them . I suggested the Xplorer, do the softer balanced flex over the Volkls and it will be better in the bumps but, yes, not as good on the hardpack. The new MX binding has given their skis a bit more power. This ski is not my choice, but it is an option and worth considering.

In the three skis that he did mention, I would say the 50 then 12 the 30. But the Head over all three.
post #23 of 24
K2's are undoubtedly better now than I remember. Otherwise, they wouldn't have survived. They're perhaps the most successful brand.
post #24 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post
But the Head over all three.
On reflection, have to like this pick a lot. Owned a pair of iM82's, now ski 88's as well as several carvers, used the 82's both out west and in your neck of the woods. Surprisingly agile in tight spaces, decent float, smooth and damp in icy bumps, very versatile. See them as a damper, more planted AC50 with a bit less edge bite and forgiveness at lower speeds, but better in crud, moderate bumps, light-moderate powder. AC50 is a very fat Sl carver, 82 is a very fat cheater GS, if you see the diff.
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