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Marker free 12 adjustment?

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 
Bought skis online, that came with "Marker 12 free" bindings + a free sticker saying that the binding was not "set" for my boot. I guess they mean toe hight/pressure? (DIN set at 8, as I specified).
The leaflet that comes with the bindings is useless, and all i've found here relates to Marker integrated systems.
So, i guess i need a link to a tech manual or a short tutorial on how to do it. (i'd rather not wait to get to the Alps, and i'd rather trust myself then the local "techs")
post #2 of 10
It you have the proper calibration devices and training from Marker to torque test bindings, go ahead and set it up yourself, or find yourself a authorized Marker dealer and have them do it correctly. There IS a cost to buying over the internet.
post #3 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by psy View Post
The leaflet that comes with the bindings is useless,

So, i guess i need a link to a tech manual or a short tutorial on how to do it. (i'd rather not wait to get to the Alps, and i'd rather trust myself then the local "techs")
Because you have NO idea how to adjust them?

So the bindings were mounted to a flat ski, that means that someone drilled holes and put the binding on? That means your 'sticker' is there to cover the tech's ass. he didn't have your boot, so he couldn't perform a function test. Odd's are the binding IS set correctly, he just can't know what condition your boots are in so he can't say "Everything is perfect"... so you get a sticker.

Marker DOES NOT WANT CONSUMERS ADJUSTING THEIR OWN BINDINGS. They don't tell you how to do it because they don't want you to do it, get it? Why is this hard to understand?

I couldn't care less about your 'safety' so I'll tell you how:

step 1: pick ski up to eye level looking toward light source, inspect that the binding is flat on the ski and fully screwed down... no gaps of light. Surprising how often this is screwed up.

step 2: place boot in binding, look at back of heel piece. There is a screw facing toward the tail low on the binding (there are two, you want the lower), it should be flush to the binding housing for correct forward pressure. If it sticks out remove your boot and tighten then reinsert boot... check again. repeat until flush.

step 3: drink a beer.

step 4: Check visual indicator settings for DIN (there are 4)... look OK? Good.

step 5: drink another beer. Done.
post #4 of 10
Sorry Phil, someone was bound to 'answer'... might as well be someone who gets it correct.
post #5 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Whiteroom View Post
Sorry Phil, someone was bound to 'answer'... might as well be someone who gets it correct.
The floor is yours
post #6 of 10
Last season, everyone was trying to mount their bindings WAY forward on their skis. This season, it looks like mounting your own bindings at home is "all the rage."
In my humble opinion, I think it's best that you have your bindings mounted/adjusted/tested by a real shop tech.... on the manufacturers suggested mounting point!
I've mounted thousands of skis in my day and I wouldn't imagine doing it at home... unless it was some kind of emergency!!
post #7 of 10
DCND, the bindings ARE mounted (that's how I read the question anyway) but there is a sticker saying "get them checked with YOUR boots"... CYA.
post #8 of 10
Bring them to a shop for a setting, adjustment, and release test with your actual boot.
post #9 of 10
yup ... and don't discount the forward pressure setting - you don't wanna know. OK I'll tell ya anyway - you might lose your ski otherwise. At just the wrong time. Until it's right. But once it's set up you're OK, ... until you're not so you should check it once in a while too.

Personally, this is why I don't have stuff mounted automagically when interweb ordering. Just send the stuff and I'll have the shop set it up.
post #10 of 10
Thread Starter 
Thanks. The bindings are, indeed, mounted. The shop has a good reputation, and i visually checked the mounting.
Buying on-line, cheaply, a ski that is not available locally, indeed has it's price. Also, not trusting the local "ski shop" (that mounts 10 pairs of skis per season, if they're lucky, and actually are a clothing shop) has a price. And for me, that price is learning and doing things by myself. I may start out with no idea, but i can learn and i care (and if i could reach a decent shop, i'd go there).
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