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Eastern Skiers - Better? - Page 2

post #31 of 162
Quote:
Originally Posted by bmg97 View Post
Why don't we have a ski off to settle this. Flip a coin for home mountain advantage. Best of 5 wins it. East vs West or West vs East however way you wanna say it !!!!!

Get it on !
I vote MidWest
post #32 of 162
Quote:
Originally Posted by bmg97 View Post
Why don't we have a ski off to settle this. Flip a coin for home mountain advantage. Best of 5 wins it. East vs West or West vs East however way you wanna say it !!!!!

Get it on !
There's only one way to settle this.
post #33 of 162
Quote:
Originally Posted by Captain_Strato View Post
I've heard skiers from Aspen wear fur and can't ski.

Celebrations will commence promptly.

Quite true, that's why I'm there so that I have the mountains to myself and only have to deals with the Texans in town
post #34 of 162
I'm from the east coast. Skiing on the east coast definetly makes you less picky. It also makes you want to ski a lot more. However, east coast skiers can't really be better than west coast skiers, the west coast difficulty of trails is so much harder. Plus, skiing in deep powder is very different than very light snow or ice, so skiing on ice might be harder/really suck, skiing in powder is pretty hard (but easier to get a hang of). And yes, you can "get a hang of" skiing on ice. It's such bad skiing it can be fun, haha.


Rich white kids on the east coast are just free skiing brats mostly now. They don't need good snow or tough hills, they just like their little jumps (at least most of the novice ones do - some free skiers actually go off decent cliffs and such and have some real old school skier skill, but a lot of them don't).

I also would agree that the east coast may make you a better turner, but when you start turning like you do on the east coast on deep powder, again it's very different (I experienced this for the first time last year, at the age of 18, I was skiing in very deep powder in Alta, and it was different, and because it was different and new, it was difficult.
post #35 of 162
I heart the early morning Sun glistening off the polished smooth glare of Blue Ice of a run. The chatter of ski edges that could yank a hamstring off a weight lifter. Seeing Fish frozen in mid-swim 2 feet below the groom. Looking into the Ice that's been scrapped to the sheen of a mirror in the lift line to see How's my hair? Yep, nothing like skiing the trees on an EPIC day like that.
post #36 of 162
Quote:
Originally Posted by slider View Post
Seeing Fish frozen in mid-swim 2 feet below the groom. Looking into the Ice that's been scrapped to the sheen of a mirror in the lift line to see How's my hair?
BWAH!
post #37 of 162
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rise To The Top View Post
Alot of the kids who set the 25 and 30pt penalties arent all that rich, nor do they attend ski academies.
Whatever. In any case, New England has more people period than Colorado by a factor of three or so. If you include NY and NJ (which have produced some skiers) it is a factor of seven or eight.

The real question is with all these skiers why the heck doesn't the Northeast turn out a bigger portion of the elite athletes in the country. And the answer to this question likely has little to do with the weather.
post #38 of 162
In the opening post, Captain_Strato wrote
Quote:
Easterners contend with boilerplate and blue ice. They carve like a Ginsu knife.
Sorry, Captain, but precise carving skills are about as rare here in the Northeast as they are out West. Sometimes you can ski groomers for a few hours at the Vermont majors without seeing a perfect edge-locked carve. Our Eastern mystique may be earned by a few elite skiers but it isn't justified for the great mass of us Eastern skiers.

Last year, I attended a well-known 1-week ski camp with skiers from all over the country. We were grouped based on skiing ability and aggressiveness. Each group wound up with a mix of Easterners, Midwesterners, and Westerners with the occasional overseas skier thrown in for good luck. From this I conclude that passionate, dedicated skiers are pretty much the same wherever they call their home mountain or hill.

Skiing is fundamentally about balance, and it seems to me that balance can be trained about as well anywhere there's a bit of vertical and some form of frozen water.
post #39 of 162
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by sharpedges View Post
In the opening post, Captain_Strato wrote
Sorry, Captain, but precise carving skills are about as rare here in the Northeast as they are out West. Sometimes you can ski groomers for a few hours at the Vermont majors without seeing a perfect edge-locked carve. Our Eastern mystique may be earned by a few elite skiers but it isn't justified for the great mass of us Eastern skiers.

Last year, I attended a well-known 1-week ski camp with skiers from all over the country. We were grouped based on skiing ability and aggressiveness. Each group wound up with a mix of Easterners, Midwesterners, and Westerners with the occasional overseas skier thrown in for good luck. From this I conclude that passionate, dedicated skiers are pretty much the same wherever they call their home mountain or hill.

Skiing is fundamentally about balance, and it seems to me that balance can be trained about as well anywhere there's a bit of vertical and some form of frozen water.
We used to go on yearly ski-trips in CO with a group from our small town (when I lived in Iowa).

We booked a week at Copper, but hit a bad stretch of boilerplate ice. It was created by a rare early-season combination of freezing rain and wind. The result was pure evil.

I found it unskiable, as did almost everyone. Think of a stork splayed on an ice-rink.

But, two guys from our group, raised in the east, danced down that bullet-proof marble with nary a care.

When we asked how it was possible, they told us the conditions were no biggie for skiers raised on ice.

I've since concluded something confered unnatural powers upon these eastern blokes.
post #40 of 162
Quote:
Originally Posted by Captain_Strato View Post
We used to go on yearly ski-trips in CO with a group from our small town (when I lived in Iowa).

We booked a week at Copper, but hit a bad stretch of boilerplate ice. It was created by a rare early-season combination of freezing rain and wind. The result was pure evil.

I found it unskiable, as did almost everyone. Think of a stork splayed on an ice-rink.

But, two guys from our group, raised in the east, danced down that bullet-proof marble with nary a care.

When we asked how it was possible, they told us the conditions were a day in the park for skiers raised on ice.

I've since presumed some mystical rite confers unnatural powers on decent eastern skiers.

Nahh, they just had sharp edges. I spent a season in Tahoe where I didn't shapren my edges once. Didn't need to I was skiing powder almost every day and when it wasn't powder it was crud.
post #41 of 162
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by crank View Post
Nahh, they just had sharp edges. I spent a season in Tahoe where I didn't shapren my edges once. Didn't need to I was skiing powder almost every day and when it wasn't powder it was crud.
Edges were probably a factor.

But, I believe they also edged differently. Whereas we'd brake hard into the hill, (due to well-founded fear), they'd make lots of small edge-sets, dicing the hill as they descended.

They had the feel of the ice, and the confidence to use it rather than fight it.

Once you pass the panic threshold, and realize you really can ski the stuff, I'm sure it gets easier.

I've never encountered pure ice like that since.
post #42 of 162
One common weather pattern in the midatlantic is a warm storm preceding a cool front. You get 1/2" rain on the slopes and then it cools down 30 degrees. You just have to sharpen your edges and avoid the shiny patches.
post #43 of 162
Quote:
Originally Posted by Captain_Strato View Post
I've never skied in the east. But, I've always presumed eastern skiers are better...

Once I thought otherwise…now I feel the best sliders who grew up east skiing mach schnell below tree line and then settle west of the divide lead it…these guys and girls are easy to spot and challenging to hang with.
post #44 of 162
Quote:
Originally Posted by DonDenver View Post

Once I thought otherwise…now I feel the best sliders who grew up east skiing mach schnell below tree line and then settle west of the divide lead it…these guys and girls are easy to spot and challenging to hang with.
hey I resemble that remark.
post #45 of 162
Quote:
Originally Posted by bmg97 View Post
Why don't we have a ski off to settle this. Flip a coin for home mountain advantage. Best of 5 wins it. East vs West or West vs East however way you wanna say it !!!!!

Get it on !
You know I'm in
post #46 of 162
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richie-Rich View Post
You know I'm in
lols

if this really did happen. Ill play for the highest bidder IE whoever scores me free lift ticket and a place to stay. I think I would be good teammate on either side of the country.
post #47 of 162

What is West anyway?

I'm confused, does the PNW count as West or does it count as its own region?

I tend to associate West skiers with the Rockies (UT, CO, WY, etc.) but not the Cascades (OR, WA, & BC...), what about Sierra in CA? Where does that fall?

What is the geographical definition for a West skier?
post #48 of 162
The PNW is the PNW. It is bordered on the east by the Cascades and the Inland Empire. To the west by the Pacific. Oregon lies to the south and forms a buffer zone between the PNW and California. Canada is to the north. The PNW has no resorts (honestly) & is therefore of no interest to anyone. Quite boring really...

post #49 of 162
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rio View Post
For your own safety, I highly recommend anyone living out east not come out west to ski.
Midwesterners okay?

Quote:
Originally Posted by spindrift View Post
Do you have a device that measures fun?
This > <
post #50 of 162
/didn't read the whole thread

I've met too many Eastern skiers who could carve like a ginsu knife who were terrified by ankle deep powder. Happens almost every day.

That said, how many Western powder skiers sleep in if conditions are less than perfect? Many.

Who's better? I'm not touchin' that one.
post #51 of 162
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tetranode View Post
I'm confused, does the PNW count as West or does it count as its own region?

I tend to associate West skiers with the Rockies (UT, CO, WY, etc.) but not the Cascades (OR, WA, & BC...), what about Sierra in CA? Where does that fall?

What is the geographical definition for a West skier?
I once heard this from a travel dude making a living booking ski trips:

Rockies= NM, CO & UT

West= PNW & CA

North Rockies=WY & MT

Canada=Canada
post #52 of 162
Quote:
Originally Posted by spindrift View Post
The PNW is the PNW. It is bordered on the east by the Cascades and the Inland Empire. To the west by the Pacific. Oregon lies to the south and forms a buffer zone between the PNW and California. Canada is to the north. The PNW has no resorts (honestly) & is therefore of no interest to anyone. Quite boring really...

Whistler-Blackcomb should be considered part of the PNW since it basically share the same storm front as many of the ski areas in the Cascades... Furthermore I don't believe Canada should be its own region because we all know Canada isn't real.
post #53 of 162
Quote:
Originally Posted by tromano View Post
I am pretty sure easterners are just better at tuning their edges.
Yup. And- therefore more understanding of how to use (and save) those edges.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Garrett View Post
The density of rich white kids and academies in New England far exceeds CO.
Okay... but hardcoreness tends to come from ragwool (er- duct-tape), in my experience.

Quote:
Originally Posted by bmg97 View Post
Why don't we have a ski off to settle this.
Get it on !
Whatever happened to HS? I joined Epic during his moment-of-truth.

Quote:
Originally Posted by spindrift View Post
Do you have a device that measures fun?
Doesn't count. A very sick little 6yo raised by world-cuppers living at KW replied that "Iccceeeeeee" was her favorite type of snow when asked on a powder day. She is the youngest person I have ever seen drop into Jim's. (This should put Ty in his place.) Her whole family watched, she dropped in, then shouted "Just drop in and stop on that mogul. Then you can just ski." Her "world cup" family skied around the rock and met her below. This is BY FAR my greatest memory from 5 years at KW. That kid was jaw-dropping. It was about (no exageration) a 15 foot drop to a mogul... for a kid that stood less than a meter high. And- she was wishing she was on ice that day. I spent the rest of the morning following her because I was so awe-struck at her boredom. A prodigy who burned-out by age 10 because her parents couldn't keep up. You wanna laugh... but it was actually quite sad watching her frustration with those around her. Her parents' biggest mistake was not hooking her up with the freeskiing team, imo. She may have survived if she had 18-24yo's pushing her in terrain. (Then again, what parent would want that?)

Quote:
Originally Posted by slider View Post
I heart the early morning Sun glistening off the polished smooth glare of Blue Ice of a run. The chatter of ski edges that could yank a hamstring off a weight lifter. Seeing Fish frozen in mid-swim 2 feet below the groom. Looking into the Ice that's been scrapped to the sheen of a mirror in the lift line to see How's my hair? Yep, nothing like skiing the trees on an EPIC day like that.
Spit at a lift-tower... if it doesn't bounce, it ain't cold.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Captain_Strato View Post
But, two guys from our group, raised in the east, danced down that bullet-proof marble with nary a care.
Preserved for "nary a care." Brilliant.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Skiing-in-Jackson View Post
I once heard this from a travel dude making a living booking ski trips:

Rockies= NM, CO & UT

West= PNW & CA

North Rockies=WY & MT

Canada=Canada
Agreed. Except Canada has Western, Central, and Eastern.

- - -

Oh... and ice-bred skiers actually keep diamond-polished edges on their pow skis... really- it matters. Trust me. If you don't get that... you might as well fill your bases with sand.

The biggest difference I have discovered between EC and WC skiers is the preservation of clean and fast edges.

"You don't need sharp edges for pow."
"Not for turning, you don't."

My pow skis have flawless edges. We ice-bred skiers can feel those flakes hooking up.
post #54 of 162
The best skiers are the ones that can handle everything...from eastern boilerplate death ribbons to western steeps and bottomless pow.

Many of the great skiers have spent years skiing both the East and the West. For obvious reasons, the vast majority of those skiers grew up in the East, then moved West.
post #55 of 162
Quote:
Originally Posted by NonstopSki View Post
I'm from the east coast. Skiing on the east coast definetly makes you less picky. It also makes you want to ski a lot more. However, east coast skiers can't really be better than west coast skiers, the west coast difficulty of trails is so much harder. Plus, skiing in deep powder is very different than very light snow or ice, so skiing on ice might be harder/really suck, skiing in powder is pretty hard (but easier to get a hang of). And yes, you can "get a hang of" skiing on ice. It's such bad skiing it can be fun, haha.


Rich white kids on the east coast are just free skiing brats mostly now. They don't need good snow or tough hills, they just like their little jumps (at least most of the novice ones do - some free skiers actually go off decent cliffs and such and have some real old school skier skill, but a lot of them don't).

I also would agree that the east coast may make you a better turner, but when you start turning like you do on the east coast on deep powder, again it's very different (I experienced this for the first time last year, at the age of 18, I was skiing in very deep powder in Alta, and it was different, and because it was different and new, it was difficult.
Last year at the Gathering in Utah there were quite a few Mid Atlantic East Coast skiers. We had thigh to waist deep powder for days and everybody seemed to handled it well and lasted most of each day. A good skier can adapt and deal with any conditions.

If someone lives out West and skis often instead of cherry picking fair weather and powder days you would likely see as many varied conditions as in the East.

And I love the park rats. They are keeping our little ski areas alive here in the East. I fear our local areas will close any year. That would suck worse than having to ski here.
post #56 of 162
Sweet fancy Moses, this thread again?

Ok, easterners are better on ice because that's what we end up dealing with. If you love skiing as much as I do, you learn to make the best of it because IT WILL BE THERE- usually around a blind corner, that steep patch in the tight woods or even covered in death cookies under the lift. Waiting to pounce.

Westerners are better in powder, because that's what they have more often than not. I've never had a true waist-deep pow day. It's sad but true. Therefore, I would expect to get stomped on by someone who skis all the time in such conditions.

I think it would be safe to say and far more respectful to truly gifted eastern and western skiers that easterners may be better suited for the worst conditions and westerners may be better suited for the best conditions.
post #57 of 162
Quote:
Originally Posted by Garrett View Post
Whatever. In any case, New England has more people period than Colorado by a factor of three or so. If you include NY and NJ (which have produced some skiers) it is a factor of seven or eight.

The real question is with all these skiers why the heck doesn't the Northeast turn out a bigger portion of the elite athletes in the country. And the answer to this question likely has little to do with the weather.
Why the comparison of all of New England with the single state of Colorado?
post #58 of 162
I don't like to generalize about which skiers are better East or West, but the good skiers that you see in the West are from the East.

Also, it's safe to say - East coast skiers are better looking and smarter, generally speaking.
post #59 of 162
Exposure to sking various situations that present themselves under the many types of conditions that the East and West have to offer certainly has a positive impact on a persons ability. That being said, as an Eastern skier myself, I would think the Western skier has the upper hand.

Regardless of what I said above, when I witness someone out there that really has it together, It's definately a treat to watch. Regardless of where they're from, I really admire the ability and technique. Furthermore I have nothing but respect for the dedication and effort it took for the person to get to that level.

RMP
post #60 of 162
Best US men World Cup ski racers from:
New Hampshire
Washington
California

So just from the coasts. I think this means absolutely nothing, BTW.
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