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Riders - Why would you want to learn to ski?

post #1 of 32
Thread Starter 
Having read this thread: http://forums.epicski.com/showthread.php?t=54141, let's open up discussion on why riders would want to learn skiing. I can start with recounting my experience...

I started out snowboarding at 19. After a year of taking lessons, I became good enough to instruct and was hired. During the afterhours, I rode with co-workers, many of them were skiers. As hard as I tried, it was hard to keep up with my co-workers, since they were... well... good.

I'm no slouch, I'm one of the more athletic instructors who rides 8 to 10 hours a day with night riding, but there are limitations to what I can do on my lunch trays. After traversing, going off jumps, and weaving through the icy mogul fields with my skier friends, some thoughts hit me: maybe having one plank per foot is better than two feet per plank...

I finally had it and picked up a pair of rental boots and skis. Under the guidance of some senior ski instructors, I snowplowed down the green lifts...

Having balance and experience from snowboarding, virtually every skill set was carried over to skiing. In a week under the watchful eye of the ski instructors, I could carve.

Fast forward to age 22, I'm currently teaching basic skiing to kids and improving on my skiing everyday and loving it. Snowboarding is fun, but skiing is funner. Here's some related random thoughts:

1. Within a week of skiing, I could travel with far more precision than I ever could on a board.

2. I no longer sit in the middle of runways to buckle up.

3. After facing boiler plate conditions on both, I could safely say that the skis will provide far more control; I could straightline without fearing for my life.

4. Powder days? I'd pick my Guns over GNUs, 'nuff said.

5. Going off the jumps on a snowboard is crazy scary.

6. Going off the jumps feels a lot more natural when you're square with the lip and not facing sideways.

7. I could get far bigger air going off the jumps and try stuff I never would on one plank... like front flips for example.

8. I can now traverse without waddling like a penguin.

9. Moguls are actually fun now that I'm on two.

10. Skiers will demolish riders in a downhill race. Every time.

Make no mistake, I was a snowboarder and it was fun, but skiing just offers so much more...

I'm a snowboarder who realized the error of his ways. Now my younger cousins wants to learn snowboarding because their friends do it... Oh boy, sooner or later I'm gonna have to let them in on the truth
post #2 of 32

There is certainly nothing wrong with your opinion...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tetranode View Post
I'm no slouch, I'm one of the more athletic instructors who rides 8 to 10 hours a day with night riding, but there are limitations to what I can do on my lunch trays. After traversing, going off jumps, and weaving through the icy mogul fields with my skier friends, some thoughts hit me: maybe having one plank per foot is better than two feet per plank...
I always say, "if it were easy, it would be called skiing." I really believe that (when comparing the two). However, there are some people who are the exact opposite. Some people just cannot get skiing and find it easy to board. Everyone is different. In the end, I believe that the majority will find skiing to be easier. I have talked to people who have not done either who think that snowboarding would be easier and I have talked to some who envision skiing being easier. I encourage them to go with what they can see in their mind because it will definitely work out just like they see it.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Tetranode View Post
Snowboarding is fun, but skiing is funner.
Some people find easier sports to be more fun. Some people find their fun in more of a challenge. Either way, some will enjoy going in a forward facing direction on two planks and some will like being sideways in boardsports.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Tetranode View Post
1. Within a week of skiing, I could travel with far more precision than I ever could on a board.

3. After facing boiler plate conditions on both, I could safely say that the skis will provide far more control; I could straightline without fearing for my life.

7. I could get far bigger air going off the jumps and try stuff I never would on one plank... like front flips for example.

8. I can now traverse without waddling like a penguin.

9. Moguls are actually fun now that I'm on two.
I edited out some of the stuff that was based on opinion because you are certainly entitled you yours (and I am glad that you found your niche, even if it was not snowboarding).

What is left are skill based statements that just go to show that you probably were not on the right equipment. There are plenty of snowboarders out there who can do the above list of skills as well as the majority of skiers.

Heck, I just got back from the Olympic Training Center at Lake Placid where I did the PSIA/AASI jump camp. I am far and away better at snowboarding in EVERY aspect, but I coach both. The first day I rode a snowboard and the second day I was on skis. Doing the plastic ramps into a pool was so much easier on skis that I felt like I could have done it with my eyes closed. There were boarders there who I have looked up to for a long time who really struggled on board. I was not impressed with my performance on a board either. In fact, they said that they don't even allow boards to go off of the big jumps because it is next to impossible to control them down the long narrow starting ramps. I still had more fun on a board than on skis.

In the end, you may think that you are pushing the truth, but preference of one over the other comes down to opinion, not fact.

Again, I am glad that you have realized your preference. Enjoy the skis.
post #3 of 32
hey phil, thanks for stealing my skiing's easy thunder. i do like your more 'pc' commentary though.

normally i don't reply to unintelligent, somewhat prejudice slanted posts (especially with excessive emoticon usage), but since i had a bad day and it will feel good (at least temporarily) to rip back at this nonsense, i've listed a few responses:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tetranode View Post
I started out snowboarding at 19. After a year of taking lessons, I became good enough to instruct and was hired. During the afterhours, I rode with co-workers, many of them were skiers. As hard as I tried, it was hard to keep up with my co-workers, since they were... well... good.
That's funny, I rode w/ my skiing co-workers and got better and better as a rider. at first i was definitely slower in the bumps, but not on the other areas across the mountain. And being Colorado, my co-workers were very good. but with persistence and practice and guidence, my skills and techniques improved greatly. eventually i kept up and sometimes beat the skiers not that any of us were looking to race. sounds like you could have used more lessons for yourself.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tetranode View Post
I'm no slouch, I'm one of the more athletic instructors who rides 8 to 10 hours a day with night riding, but there are limitations to what I can do on my lunch trays. After traversing, going off jumps, and weaving through the icy mogul fields with my skier friends, some thoughts hit me: maybe having one plank per foot is better than two feet per plank...
Ty Webb to Judge Smails: "Don't sell yourself short Judge, you're a tremendous slouch"

our resort wasn't open at night and i taught alot, so i got about 2 hours a day of practice, but i put it to good use w/ drills and clinics when possible. though i've never come to the conclusion that two planks would be better. in fact i realized that the way i'm attached to the snowboard gives me a tactical advantage that skiers don't have: twist. i can actively twist the board with my feet/legs during turns since i'm attached sideways.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Tetranode View Post
Snowboarding is fun, but skiing is funner. Here's some related random thoughts:

1. Within a week of skiing, I could travel with far more precision than I ever could on a board.
that's 'cuz skiing is easy. all you have to do is stand up and go. you don't even need skill/talent. seriously if you can't handle a board as well as skis maybe you just sucked at riding a board. generally boards have shorter sidecut radii, which means that they can turn tighter and quicker than skis which have larger sidecuts. i bet roller blades might be 'funner' for you too.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tetranode View Post
2. I no longer sit in the middle of runways to buckle up.
i've never sat in the middle of a runway to buckle up, in fact i balance and stand up when cranking the binders down and actually have to negotiate the gaper skiers who stand in front of the chair lift exit before getting to a spot where i'm not in the way.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tetranode View Post
3. After facing boiler plate conditions on both, I could safely say that the skis will provide far more control; I could straightline without fearing for my life.
see tactical advantage from above. works in any condition.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tetranode View Post
4. Powder days? I'd pick my Guns over GNUs, 'nuff said.
my guess is you've never tried boards specifically designed to ride in powder, otherwise you might have a different response here. the surface area of a board alone creates more float and i think the float is what feels good when riding in powder.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tetranode View Post
5. Going off the jumps on a snowboard is crazy scary.
that may be true for any piece of equipment depending on the feature. but it sounds like in general you had no technique working for you otherwise you'd have been able to control and handle the board at speed going over obstacles.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tetranode View Post
6. Going off the jumps feels a lot more natural when you're square with the lip and not facing sideways.
this is the only comment you've made that might be true. i've ridden and practiced w/ alignment drills from the beginning, so i'm used to it by now. but this sideways arrangement is a challenge at first for a lot of 'beginners'.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tetranode View Post
7. I could get far bigger air going off the jumps and try stuff I never would on one plank... like front flips for example.
i guess you need to grow a set to help here.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tetranode View Post
8. I can now traverse without waddling like a penguin.
again, sounds like underdeveloped skill base/lack of talent

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tetranode View Post
9. Moguls are actually fun now that I'm on two.
i love bumps and am only on one. simplicity is fun.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tetranode View Post
10. Skiers will demolish riders in a downhill race. Every time.
where does this 'food for thought' item fit as a real reason that boarders should learn skiing?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tetranode View Post
Make no mistake, I was a snowboarder and it was fun, but skiing just offers so much more...

I'm a snowboarder who realized the error of his ways. Now my younger cousins wants to learn snowboarding because their friends do it... Oh boy, sooner or later I'm gonna have to let them in on the truth
are you sure you're really a boarder turned skier and not just a skier trying to rip snowboarding 'cuz you want to feel good by venting your prejudice toward a selected group?

or maybe you're just someone who wasn't good enough to become an accomplished boarder and now you're trying to dis a sport that you've got little or no talent in. i've heard it said again and again, if it was easy, they'd call it skiing.

That's why when i'm not boarding i'm on tele's - skiing's too easy!

Can we put and end to skier/snowboarder who's better comparisons/hate/bashing/etc.???
if you like skiing, great. do it, have fun and shut up. if you like boarding, great. do it, have fun and shut up.
post #4 of 32
Thread Starter 
A great way to defend snowboarding by questioning someone's ability over the internet without having a face-to-face, you are entitled to your opinion nonetheless.

All else considered, this deserves scrutiny:
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jibster View Post
that's 'cuz skiing is easy. all you have to do is stand up and go. you don't even need skill/talent. seriously if you can't handle a board as well as skis maybe you just sucked at riding a board. generally boards have shorter sidecut radii, which means that they can turn tighter and quicker than skis which have larger sidecuts. i bet roller blades might be 'funner' for you too.
I can't stop laughing, really... to write like that at the age of 36... come on now.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jibster View Post
THAT'S 'CUZ SKIING IS EASY. ALL YOU HAVE TO DO IS STAND UP AND GO. YOU DON'T EVEN NEED SKILL/TALENT.
Quoted again for awesomeness.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jibster View Post
GENERALLY BOARDS HAVE SHORTER SIDECUT RADII, WHICH MEANS THEY CAN TURN TIGHTER AND QUICKER THAN SKIS WHICH HAVE LARGER SIDECUTS
No . You fail physics.

Consider the flex and weight as well, Einstein.

...

Okay, all jabs and meaness aside, my OP was done out of humor and sensationalism. As an instructor, I would never sit in the middle of the runway to buckle up. Waddling like a penguin is added for humor. Some of the stuff were inspired by the beginners I teach, relax. So before anyone get their panties wrinkled defending snowboarding from "bashers" like myself who "can't snowboard," I'd like to say I teach both sports and they are both fun.

If you disagree with the OP, note the name "Tetranode" next to it, and it is my opinion.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jibster View Post
that's 'cuz skiing is easy. all you have to do is stand up and go. you don't even need skill/talent.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jibster View Post
that's 'cuz skiing is easy. all you have to do is stand up and go. you don't even need skill/talent.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jibster View Post
that's 'cuz skiing is easy. all you have to do is stand up and go. you don't even need skill/talent.
Pure, unadulterated awesomeness. This is going to be my new signature.
post #5 of 32
I know you are probably going to take this as you are a crappy (I'll leave that one out) snowboarder, but I think you are just more naturally adapted to skiing than snowboarding.
Everything you said about snowboarding being harder at I find is not a problem for me. In fact it's just easy.
Now I am a shitty skier, there is no arguing that.
The only reason I still dabble with it is that I ride about 40 days on my splitboard each season. Some skiing is going to happen. Though not alpine skiing I am getting better at it when I have to go downhill.
For the record I think skiing is harder than snowboarding, but that's me.
Different strokes for different folks is all.
post #6 of 32
Thread Starter 
I remember from teaching last year, some kids made the switcheroo from one sport to the other and finding themselves happier afterwards. One of the ski instructor's son decided to go regular with snowboarding, much to his father's surprise.

As far as difficulty transitioning from one sport to the other goes, one of the major hurdles to overcome is the muscle memory attained from practicing the original sport. I remember my first week transitioning to skiing: I wanted my skis to sideslip by putting pressure on my heels (that would've done the trick for a snowboard), a lot of good that did for me on skis.

When someone has been snowboarding or skiing for quite some time, and dabble in the other sport without committing themselves to the task of building the required muscle memory, they naturally will find their original sport easier than the new one.

That being said, I saw enough enjoyment in skiing for me to practice enough to become decent at it ... and continue exploring the sport.
post #7 of 32
Hey if you have fun at skiing then it's the right sport for you. I've done it enough to know I'd rather snowboard. I really don't care what people are using to get down the hill. I'll ride with whoever.
post #8 of 32
What? Give up the dark side? Surely you jest!

There will always be camps firmly in favor of one tool over the other. There will always be those who switch and never come back. Then there will be a few who will see skis and boards as just two different ski tools like a ball peen hammer is different from a claw hammer (in the end - both can hammer equally well).

As I was learning to ride there was a sense of accomplishment and an appreciation for making easy slopes a challenge once again. I went through a phase where I thought that boards weren't as good as ski for certain tasks (e.g. bumps, tight trees). As I gained experience I started seeing riders who were doing the "impossible". Now my lown list of random thoughts is a lot shorter.
post #9 of 32
My boarder son wanted to try skiing, mostly so he could learn to do the old school freestyle tricks he'd been watching me doing the past few years. After four days of skiing, I thought he was catching on pretty good, but he realized that he'd need a lot more time on the sticks before he could even begin to consider learning any kind of tricks, so now he wants to go back to boarding.

Or not. Maybe. The independent foot thing kind of bothered him a little. Actually he's kind of ambivalent. I guess we'll see how things shake out when the snow flies. Whatever he wants to do is cool with me. I suspect he will be doing a little of each from here on out.
post #10 of 32
Thread Starter 
Kids are indeed fickle about committing to either sport, from my experience they want to lick all flavors at the ice cream bar!

Kids are attracted to things that draws oohs and ahhs, like tricks in the park. Concerning jumps and halfpipes, I don't see any physical or aesthetic advantage of a board over a pair of skis.

For one, you get bigger air going off the lip, and that translate into more airtime to perform your tricks. At the highest level of halfpipe competition, Dumont can thrust his skis 22ft above the lip while White can only send 16ft with his board.

The second advantage is stability upon landing... I can smell the smoke rising from the flames already ... You can argue that it's dependent on the person and that the snowboard has a wider platform to land on, and that's completely true, but I say landing square with two planks is far more reliable than landing sideways with both feet strapped to a single board.

I don't even want to get started on the relative ease of tricks on skis...
post #11 of 32
Let's see. Let's see an all switch ski run in the halfpipe, and some 50/50 on rails.

You can say what you want, but skiing in the pipe and park has been chasing snowboarding's tail the whole time. Tricks, style, everything was copied from snowboarding. Not much originality there. If you want to see where it's going in the ski world, just see what snowboarding is doing now. That's the way it was last year, that's the way it'll be this year, and that's the way it'll be next year. There's no arguing it.
In the professional world, I don't think any of them really care.
post #12 of 32
Hope you'll forgive the perceptions of an old skier with little personal snowboarding experience, but from my observation over the years snowboards as a snowriding tool are less optimal than skis in bumps, and also not as good for getting around ski areas with lots of runouts or traverses, or in backcountry with flats and deep snow. In many ways, however, they can outperform skis in parks and on steep groomers.

My teenage son skied from age 5-10, then boarded from 10-13, then back to skiing from 13-18. He never was much for parks, but always had an interest in bumps, glades, and thoroughly exploring ski areas. I'd say the reasons he switched back to skiing fulltime were a better comfort factor at high speeds and to more easily deal with all kinds of terrain and conditions.

But my philosophy on this topic has always been: vive la difference, to each his/her own, it's all good.
post #13 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jamesj View Post
Hope you'll forgive the perceptions of an old skier with little personal snowboarding experience, but from my observation over the years snowboards as a snowriding tool are less optimal than skis in bumps, and also not as good for getting around ski areas with lots of runouts or traverses, or in backcountry with flats and deep snow. In many ways, however, they can outperform skis in parks and on steep groomers.
I agree there are some shortcomings. Traversing is the big one. Bumps can be done fine, but you have to be rather sadistic to enjoy them on a board. Boards are fine in the backcountry. Often times more optimal on long runouts. Splitboards make the difference. Where they lack is long flat outs. There is still nothing better than a snowboard in deep pow imo. Fat skis have certainly closed the gap which was huge 10 years ago.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jamesj View Post
My teenage son skied from age 5-10, then boarded from 10-13, then back to skiing from 13-18. He never was much for parks, but always had an interest in bumps, glades, and thoroughly exploring ski areas. I'd say the reasons he switched back to skiing fulltime were a better comfort factor at high speeds and to more easily deal with all kinds of terrain and conditions.
Reason enough. Not very many skiers can put me in the dust. Usually it's the other way around. Speed is just one of those things that a lot of boarders aren't probably looking for. The roots of the sport is in freestyle not racing. I still think boards are better in tight trees. Until shaped skis, you wouldn't see a skier within 10ft of the trees I enjoyed for years at Mary Jane. Again, the gap has closed.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jamesj View Post
But my philosophy on this topic has always been: vive la difference, to each his/her own, it's all good.
Exactly my point. It would be lame if everyone skied or everyone just boarded. In fact I am just fine with less boarders if that is truly the trend. Back in the day when this sport was just taking off, we had something special going on there. That bit is gone, though I find the spirit of it often when I am touring in the backcountry. Almost everybody is a kindered soul out there.
post #14 of 32
Hey KC,

It'll be one big happy stoked family this Sat. night in Denver.

Are you dressing to impress? I don't like the sound of that dress code statement.

I gotta go to Will Call first.
post #15 of 32
Yeah, the dress to impress part doesn't really mean much to me. It's a freakin' snowboard movie premier. I'll probably wear a button down and jeans. That's Denver dress to impress anyway.

I think we all have to go to will call for our tickets. I think some of us are going to meet for dinner and drinks with Shayboarder and a few others at Rock Bottom beforehand. PM here or at TOS if you're interested in joining in.
post #16 of 32
I'm always up for dinner and drinks. I've already gotten a few PM's from Shay but nothing lined up.

Shay had me worried about the dress to impress. It is a SNOWBOARD movie.....not about uptight skiers.

I'll PM over at the other joint.
post #17 of 32

Boarding/skiing

It doesn't have to be an us vs. them thing.

Both pursuits offer a more rewarding use of time than sitting at a desk. Following a 34 year absence from skiing, I resumed the sport in the winter of 96-97 and soon after took my first and only snowboard lesson. I couldn't decide which I liked more and consequently stuck with both. Today I split my time 50/50 between the two (sometimes the same day) and don't have a favorite. I encourage everyone to experience the joys of both. That approach paid off at Steamboat this past March.


post #18 of 32
Yayy, Pat Moore!

I don't get out enough to maintain my snowboarding skills. I feel like I have regressed and I find myself spending a greater portion of my very limited slope time skiing.

I sometimes think I'm too old, maybe I should take it easy, cruise groomers, then I see someone like Pat Moore, 10 years older than me, winning gold in both disciplines.

Hey tetranode, if you became an instructor after only one year of riding, you surely are talented but you shouldn't expect to keep up with ski instructors who started skiing at age 4, not right away, maybe later if you don't quit trying.

I agree that skiing is less challenging, but I'm surprised to hear that a 20 year old considers that a plus.
post #19 of 32
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by telerod15 View Post
Hey tetranode, if you became an instructor after only one year of riding, you surely are talented but you shouldn't expect to keep up with ski instructors who started skiing at age 4, not right away, maybe later if you don't quit trying.

I agree that skiing is less challenging, but I'm surprised to hear that a 20 year old considers that a plus.
Thanks, between Alpental and talented instructors, one can't remain a newbie gaper forever! On my snowboard, it's hard to keep up with ex-racing skiers and PSIA-IIs and IIIs... but as they say: If you can't beat 'em, join 'em!

Skiing is less challenging for me, that's a plus. Between Snoqualmie's terrain park and Alpental's Chair 2, whatever makes my job easier is a keeper. Examples:

Snowboarding: Snoqualmie is flat, teaching there, I can confirm that the rumors are true. Traversing, Crossovers = lol.
Skiing: It works for me.

Snowboarding: I could barely spin a 180 in the beginner's terrain park.
Skiing: Went off the large features in the advanced park after 10 days of skiing. By the end of last season, 720s and front flips off Alpental's shovel-built kickers were followed by "WOOOO!" from the lifts.

Snowboarding: I couldn't clear the lip of the halfpipe, go ahead laugh.
Skiing: 8ft off the lip last season.

Snowboarding: I've straightlined down the entire Alpine Face, and feared for my life the entire way.
Skiing: Just another crud-busting session.

So skiing as it turned out for me, because it was less challenging than snowboarding, I was able to do more on it.
post #20 of 32
Free your heel, and ski for real!

Haha, just kidding. I get your point. I'm sort of a wimp, so I prefer challenge of 180 in the beginner park vs. challenge of 720s and flips. I guess I shifted from alpine to telemark and snowboard so I could challenge myself without going big. That was before terrain parks, so going big at the little hills I frequent wasn't really an option even if I had been so inclined.
post #21 of 32
I've been a Snowboarder for about 10 years now. And this next season Im going to try Skiing for the first time. I started snowboarding because we had a school trip out to the local hill and they let you choose between Skiing and Snowboarding. At the time there was nothing close to what the Skis are like now. No twin tips, nothing like that. So naturally I chose snowboarding.

I just want to try Skiing out, and if I like it, great. If not, I'll just stick to snowboarding. Something I have noticed (no offense to anyone) but the chicks that ski seem to be a lot more attractive (to me at least).
post #22 of 32
skiing never really clicked with me. so i decided go try snowboarding. after a few days on the snow i starting getting the hang of it (with the help of lessons of course). so now that i have a season of snowboarding under my belt and finished it riding better on one plank than i ever did on two, i guess i'll stick with it for awhile.
post #23 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by therusty View Post

There will always be camps firmly in favor of one tool over the other. There will always be those who switch and never come back. Then there will be a few who will see skis and boards as just two different ski tools like a ball peen hammer is different from a claw hammer (in the end - both can hammer equally well).
Im with using both
Just depends on what mountain
and how i feel that day
post #24 of 32
Welcome to Epic Fender! I get on both sets of gear most days.
post #25 of 32
I've been skiing for 37 years. I've been snowboarding for 16 or so years consistantly (I tried it a few times in the late 80s, but I didn't like the metal fin that Burton had back then).

I started out 80/20 Skiing/Snowboarding about 16 years ago. Then went to 30/70 Skiing/Snowboarding. I gave up skiing for the most part for about 2 years. Then about 4 years ago I started teaching my son to ski, so I went back to almost 90% skiing.

Now I do both. Probably still 60/40 skiing/snowboarding. Mostly because when I'm with my son, I like to wear skis so I can help him learn to ski better.

Anyway.. After going back and forth and continuing to do both. I really think a lot of the original comments are opinions.

I can go really fast on a snowboard and beat skiers that I know. I can also go fast on skis and beat most skiers and snowboards. I can do moguls on skis and snowboards. It is fun for me either way. It is just a different challenge. I can keep up with other skiers and snowboarders that I know....

These are the advantages for each for me:
Skiing:
-I like Skiing more if the conditions are icy or hardpack.
-I like skiing more if I am going places where I know I might have to do some walking on cat tracks or at the bottom of a powder run.
-I like skiing more if the conditions are crowded, as I don't have as much of a blind spot.
-I like skiing more if there are huge (volkswagon size moguls) on very steep terrain. Mostly because I'm more comfortable on skis on these big moguls. Then again..if I'm up for a challenge..I like snowboarding.
-Finally, I like skiing more when going up a T bar or Poma lift.

Snowboarding:
-I like Snowboarding in powder and how nice it feels carving turns in deep powder on a snowboard. Almost like being on water or something. I like skiing in Powder too. I just like snowboarding a little better.
-I like Snowboarding on my feet. My snowboard boots are much more comfortable than my ski boots. I have customized ski boots, but still. The snowboard boots feel better.
-I like snowboarding when there is any "hiking up" to be done. I don't like walking in ski boots.
-I like Snowboarding with people who aren't very good skiers other than my son. I can challenge myself with new techniques or things I am interested in becoming better at on a Snowboard on any run. On skis, I get bored on trails that are too easy.

I really actually enjoy doing both. I'm think maybe Tele soon.
post #26 of 32
I do have 3 pairs of skis (SL/GS/Freeride), 2 pairs of Raxskis and 8 snowboards (SL/GS/Extremecarve - Rockboard, Longboard 2m, Pintail 168, Swallowtail 196cm, Swallowtail Splitboard 184cm) that I all use at least a few times each season. I switch during the day too usually 1-3 times. I have about 50 days pers season excluding working as a ski/snowboard teacher. I do like both, skiing and snowboarding. My usual day is ski/snowboard - racing/carving from 8-10AM and then go for freeriding. If there are few people on the skifield and slopes really well prepared I do continue a bit longer.

I could never say one is better than the other, it depends on the conditions what I chose.

I am with mogulmal on most opinions, except that my snowboard hardboots are the most comfortable, then my ski racing boots, and least comfortable are my softboots.

Moguls: I'm fastest on ma 2m Rad-Air Tanker longboard. Simply straightline the moguls. As long as you have a runout it ain't no problem to straightline nearly any moguls. You simply can't turn after a few meters anymore but have to straighline on. Going slower I don't mind wheter on freerideboard or skis. Have never tried straighlining with long freeride skis. Definitely can't straighline on any race type skis. Best tool for moguls are Raxskis to me though.

Max speed on piste: While I can go confidently a bit above 100km/h on my longboards, I am much faster on SuperG racing skis. On skis on +100km/h you can still react and drive much better, carving at +100km/h is nearly impossible on most snowboards due to the small sidecut. With a current highend GS raceceboard with 19-21m radius 90-100km/h carving is about the max possible. GS racing skis and up allow higher speeds, but hey you can't drive those speeds except when there is near to noone on piste, or its a racing course.

Simplicity: If you can snowboard well, you can ski well, not the other direction IMHO. After 7 days on skis I did my first SuperG course (with 20x Atomic SuperG skis - mind that I previously raced quite a lot on a snowboard - so racing per se was nothing new to me). Lucky that it was only 500m vert and about 40 seconds for the best, around 45 for me. Learning from 0 I think boarding or skiing doesn't matter much. But yeah, the time difference is much smaller on skis. Even though I snowboard 80% of my time, racing times compared to worldcup snowboarders are in percent more off than compared to worldcup skiers (at least for Slalom to SuperG, am to scared for DH races). On skis you only need to angulate and break at the waist to lay down quite good times on any racecourse. On a snowboard it's much more difficult and needs much better ballance.

I have many controlled falls on snowboards, but only 1-2 falls on a snowboard per season where I do lose controll. On skis nearly every fall ends up in uncontrolled crash due to your skis coming off. If you watch a snowboard worldcup race you may not see one uncontrollable crash during the whole day (qualification and finals), whereas with skiers I'ld say 1/10 runs ends in uncontrollable crash, snowboarder do fall more often though however, with reraces allways allowing you to catch up again.

Radii: On snowboard you can play a lot more with the radius. I get a 14m raceboard carve 4-5m turns without probs, can't do that on skis at all. It's simple physics, while you can tilt your snowboard to say 75°, you can't tilt your skis as high (with the hips touching the snow for skiing as well as for boarding). With softboots I can still vary the radius more than on skis.

Powder: real powder snowboards feel way better to me, much more fun. If you dread traverses take something like a Radical Surf 222cm, and you will end up way higher than any skier
Going through flat sections, the advantage is with skis of course, but using a splitboard makes it no big hassle.
Really steep offpiste is easier on a snowboard. Especially roping in, or going down with an ice axe I see much more boarders doing than skiers. Never seen skiers using ice axes for super steeps, many boarders do this however to tackle 80° ice walls (famous Marco Siffredi going down with one ice axe in each hand a first descent somewhere from Mont-Blanc in summer).

In tight forest snowboards are much more manouverable than skis, but then my Raxskis are way better than any of my snowboards. The Raxskis are no fun at all onpiste though to me.

Tricks: Easier on skis, at least for me. Landing big jumps too, but 20-30m tables are possible on snowboard too, and if you drop flat on big jumps, it doesn't matter much what tool you use.

Icy conditions: no skis give me the same controll as a really well sharpened raceboard. But SL/GS racingskis get close. As for softbootboards, carving on really icy places is hardly possible, but then the same goes for freerideskis. No problem having enough grip for drifting on any ski/snowboard though!

I did notice that over the last 4-5 years snowboarding lost much ground though. That's IMHO however because the industry is pushing skiing right now. In a normal Austrian Sport Shop like Intersport Eybl they will have about 5-10 times the area dedicated to skis than to boards nowadays. 5 years ago this was more or less 50/50. Many snowboarders feel fine on 10+ years old snowboards, can't say the same for skiers. Problem is IMHO that the snowboard industry is mainly pushing freestyle and kids boards. But hey, WTF are you supposed to do with a 160cm snowboard on piste???? 180-220cm snowboards for softboots or raceboards are the way to go if you wan't to enjoy pisteriding. Longobards work waaayyy better than those kiddy 150-160cm boards most people use offpiste, no wonder why so many people are switching to 190cm freerideskis. IMHO a snowboards needs to be about 10-20cm longer than a ski to give equivalent stability at the same speed.

Size Matters, Go Long, Go Radical 222cm, Pogo Maverick 230cm or similiar..... (and no those are no expert only tools, 3-4 days of adapting and they do nearly everything better than those kids boards).
post #27 of 32
I took a friend who visited me from oversea to learn ski last month. The reason I choose to learn ski with my friend is because he does not speak English well. I took the lesson to keep him company. I also think he can have more fun learning to ski in the amount of time he has.

I was able to link turns the first day on simple green slop without falling much. My friend said my skiing was ugly and he ski better. He made this comment because he did not understand why instructor took me on the lift and not him. He was able to get on the lift and ski down green hill after a couple more days while I ride snowboard at the same time.

I have only ski once but I agree with mogulman1. I am currently looking for a cheap used ski so I can learn to ski when the condition is icy. I know I can have some fun on ski.

I think one reason my skiing look strange to my friend is because I was not sure if I should follow instructions. I could ski differently than what was taught but I want to be able to do what the instructor taught. For example, my inside leg is lifted of ground when trying to make wedge turn while my outside leg is on edge (like snowboard). I have to consciously make an effort to put my foot on the ground to keep the wedge, and also keep my hands in front of me and stuff like that. The instructor thought I was going too fast sometimes and I was going to fall. I did fall the first time but not after. I also did not tell instructor that I ride snowboard.
post #28 of 32
I'm holding off on learning to ski as I'm still having a lot of fun boarding. I know skiiing is fun as well, but it's something I'll probably reserve for doing when I get older when I can't take the falls from boarding anymore.
post #29 of 32
On the Snowboard for 17 years now.
No desire to ski.
Ever.
post #30 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by dogstar View Post
I'm holding off on learning to ski as I'm still having a lot of fun boarding. I know skiiing is fun as well, but it's something I'll probably reserve for doing when I get older when I can't take the falls from boarding anymore.
Good God man,

Get the learning and falling part done now while you're still young. Then you'll be ready to switch painlessly when you're too old to ride. That should be about 80.
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