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Ski & Snowboard Growth Statistics?

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 
Last year my snowboarding newphew assured me that skiing was in decline, and that snowboards would soon overtake and replace skis.

Does anyone have the latest stats on this?

Ski & snowboard growth, decline?
post #2 of 14
Actually I have read quite the opposite. Snowboarding is not dieing, but its growth has stagnated. Twin tip skis have given a whole new life to skiing and skiing is on the rise. Sorry I don't have stats but this is the last that I heard last year.
post #3 of 14
Ha, that's funny.
post #4 of 14
If you look in the parks these days you see as many skiers as snowboarders, I think that skiing is now "cool" because the younger kids don't want to be "square" like their older siblings who snowboard.

I know of a few snowboarders who've switched to skiing on twintips too, they just like it better.

OK so where are the statistics?
post #5 of 14

Some numbers here

Both skiing and snowboarding are declining. Some specifics if you're interested:

http://www.boston.com/travel/explore...nonski_slopes/
post #6 of 14
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by medmarkco View Post
Both skiing and snowboarding are declining. Some specifics if you're interested:

http://www.boston.com/travel/explore...nonski_slopes/
Thanks for the link.

Here's the info, for those interested:

"The US population of downhill skiers has declined 17 percent since 2001, with the number of skiers ages 7 and older who hit the slopes more than once during the calendar year totaling only 6.4 million in 2006, according to the National Sporting Goods Association. The snowboarding population also has slid 17 percent since 2003, turning out only 5.2 million boarders in 2006.

David Belin, director of RRC Associates, a ski and snowboard industry consultant in Boulder, Colo., said participation in physically intense downhill skiing has been blown back by the popularity of other leisure activities and destinations, the aging baby boomer population, and perhaps even by the increasing numbers of obese children."
post #7 of 14
^^^^ David would know what he's talking about. Nice guy too.

Quote:
perhaps even by the increasing numbers of obese children."
They are a challenge. No muscle tone, no endurance, and there is the expectancy that the learning curve will the same as learning to video game snowboard.
post #8 of 14
The ski industry has been through these ups and downs several times. It will weather this storm just like the others. Snowboarding for so many years enjoyed growth and has now matured. To see what's happening with snowboarding one just has to look at the ski industry trends over the last 30 years or so.
Both will be fine, though the economy may make destination resorts take a big hit in the pocket book.
post #9 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by daysailer1 View Post
^^^^ David would know what he's talking about. Nice guy too.



They are a challenge. No muscle tone, no endurance, and there is the expectancy that the learning curve will the same as learning to video game snowboard.
The instant gratification syndrome at work. I suspect a lot of current young skiers would bag it if they had to ski on something akin to a K2 710 or such. Even my own son is not sure he wants to continue with skiing, because it's more work than snowboarding for him. Guess I gotta work on his attitude some more.
post #10 of 14
Two numbers at issue:
- number of annual "skier" visits
- number of snow sports participants

The number of annual visits has been relatively flat for 30 years. (Say mid 50 million on average), which in itself is not encouraging, but steady if nothing else. http://www.nsaa.org/nsaa/press/historical-visits.pdf

The number of participants is declining.

Since recruting new participants doesn't net out positive, the logical interpretation is that those who do participate slide more to offset the decline.


Any survey or industry consultant opinion is subject to question, but the information is in line with SAM, NSAA, SIA, and other reports I’ve seen.

I’d challenge any analysis (Mr. Berlin’s) that didn’t at least mention economic factors as a component, but I also don’t subscribe to the theory that the cost of skiing is THE reason for ski/snowboard attrition. When most stadiums across the country are filled to capacity with families paying $100+ per person to watch a football/baseball game for 2-4 hours, or $12-$18 each on average for a 90 minute movie, or the number of high ticket revenue music concerts taking place, the lack of money argument is diminished. It is a choice of how the available entertainment dollars are being spent and what is more highly valued. Obviously spending 8 hours in the cold sliding down a hill is not as attractive as other activities. Many people spend the bulk of their entertainment dollars on warm weather activities and winter loses out. Personally I think skiing is a good value compared to the options listed … however, that doesn’t make it inexpensive. Lisamarie’s post regarding an increase in older skiers might be partly explained by economic factors – those people having had a lifetime to accumulate more wealth and having more free time as family obligations subside.

The past few day’s financial markets are heavily impacting just about everyone. Doubt anyone really knows how it will fall out.

**Forgot to note that I recall seeing that twin tip sales were up over 180% in the past year or two. Don't recall the report, but is was an equipent sales report. Boards were lower on that report IIRC. Doesn't necessarily equate to each pair of twin tips sold bumps a snowboard off the snow ... buyer may own and use both.
post #11 of 14
As a park skier and freerider I can assure you that Skiing is on the rise. Especially on the east coast. Here in Nebraska our one crap resort people still think snowboarding is cool because "you can go off jumps and stuff" It sometimes angers me. It is rather funny though as far as the Ski and Snowboard club I am in (university of Nebraska 130 people) Out of all the "good skiers" all of us are engineers. Out of almost all the good snowboarders, they all smoke pot. As far as I am concerned my roommate one of the
few who doesn't smoke and still snowboards agrees watching pro skiers ski park is a lot more entertaining than watching snowboarders who simply spin. In then end i guess it comes down to one thing...

DOUBLE PLANKER FOR LIFE!
post #12 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkiNebraski View Post
As a park skier and freerider I can assure you that Skiing is on the rise. Especially on the east coast. Here in Nebraska our one crap resort people still think snowboarding is cool because "you can go off jumps and stuff" It sometimes angers me. It is rather funny though as far as the Ski and Snowboard club I am in (university of Nebraska 130 people) Out of all the "good skiers" all of us are engineers. Out of almost all the good snowboarders, they all smoke pot. As far as I am concerned my roommate one of the
few who doesn't smoke and still snowboards agrees watching pro skiers ski park is a lot more entertaining than watching snowboarders who simply spin. In then end i guess it comes down to one thing...

DOUBLE PLANKER FOR LIFE!
Wait the engineers aren't smoking pot too??

I always laugh when ski areas call their terrain parks "snowboard parks". Then again the areas themselves are called "ski areas", hmmm.
What we need are snow sliding recreation areas that have mounded frozen water jumping zones (to include both snow and ice). Wow that sounds like PC run amok.

Of course skiers are more fun to watch, we've got two planks to impale ourselves on, where as snowboarders only have one.
Plus Dumont launching himself to ungodly heights and the obligatory shot of Olson's GF
post #13 of 14
Well why wouldn't they call em snowboard parks - isn't that where you smoke pot, the park?!
post #14 of 14
Around here kids are putting ads on Craigslist wanting to sell skateboards or swap skatebords for BMX bikes. I don't see nearly as many aged ads for used BMX bikes. Skateboarding ( and snowboarding) had an alllure because it was edgy and anti. Now that it is wildly popular the innovaters and influencers are moving away from it. I'm guessing this will be the next thing the rebelious chique will pursue:




A good friend of mine had and used a ski bob in the late 70s. Very cool.


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