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Park City or Tahoe?

post #1 of 20
Thread Starter 
I am planning a western trio this spring and would like some options as to either north Tahoe or Park City. I am an adaptive skier and would like to take advantage of any programs in those areas.
post #2 of 20
What is an "adaptive skier"?
post #3 of 20
Some people might call an adaptive skier a "disabled skier". But from what I have seen from a lot of adaptive skiers on the slopes, they are anything BUT disabled.
post #4 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by CD4T View Post
I am planning a western trio this spring and would like some options as to either north Tahoe or Park City. I am an adaptive skier and would like to take advantage of any programs in those areas.
I don't know about Tahoe, never having been there, but there is a National Ability Centre at Park City Mountain Resort.

Sit-skiers and others are a common sight and the lifties are trained to help.
post #5 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by TerpSKI View Post
Some people might call an adaptive skier a "disabled skier". But from what I have seen from a lot of adaptive skiers on the slopes, they are anything BUT disabled.
Bang on. I saw the Austrian team training at Hintertux last season. Bejasus. Frighteningly good.
post #6 of 20
Got it. I would definitely try PCMR, simply because adaptive skiers are not uncommon, we have the National Ability Center, and it is a very easy town to get around.

Something to consider as well, I would call Snowbasin if I were you to check out how equipped they are. During the Paralympics we watched the downhill events and it seemed like a lot of the athletes we spoke to loved the downhill course. It really doesn't have any flats and is pretty steep. So you may want to check that out.

Based on what I saw there is no way I would consider those athletes disabled, more like badass.
post #7 of 20
Park City for sure. Well planned town and mountain, and the canyons are great also and right there. I've skiied there the last 3 years and its fantastic, and have skiied with/talked to a few adaptive skiiers who were very good and very happy with PCMR. And I agree with the people above that I think badass is probably my choice word for some i've seen at PCMR.
post #8 of 20
Heavenly has a huge adaptive ski program, and a season pass that's good at all five Vail Resorts for $289, unrestricted, and entitles you to get a guide/ companion in for $40/day at Heavenly, Vail, Beavercreek, Keystone and Brekenridge.

Pretty much all the major resorts have good adaptive programs including Alpine Meadows, Squaw, Northstar/Tahoe, and Kirkwood. Heavenly/Vail is the only one I know of that gives you that kind of pass deal.
post #9 of 20
Cirque -- are you sure about Squaw, Northstar, and Kirkwood? Alpine has the Tahoe Adaptive Ski School on-site, but I never saw any adaptives at Squaw.
post #10 of 20
http://www.discovernac.org/

Take a look at this site. You may want to call them to get their opinion on other Utah ski areas. I Would think that any of the larger Utah resorts would be able to accommodate.

If you come out here you should definitely give Snowbird and Snowbasin a try. Both have some sphincter puckering groomed runs.
post #11 of 20
Alpinedad, I have seen the program at Kirkwood and Heavenly, and was aware Alpine Meadows has an off-site ski school that does adaptive. I was really expecting majors like Northstar and Squaw also would have programs, but on second look, I'm not finding it.
post #12 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cirquerider View Post
Alpinedad, I have seen the program at Kirkwood and Heavenly, and was aware Alpine Meadows has an off-site ski school that does adaptive. I was really expecting majors like Northstar and Squaw also would have programs, but on second look, I'm not finding it.
It's not off-site at Alpine, it's on-site. The adaptive program has its own building at the base of the Subway lift, complete with a cafe that subsidizes the program.

DSUSAFW site
post #13 of 20
A very good friend of mine teaches skiing for the NAC at the PCMR. My daughter rides horses there. It is top drawer all the way.

Quote:
Originally Posted by okolepuka View Post
http://www.discovernac.org/

Take a look at this site. You may want to call them to get their opinion on other Utah ski areas. I Would think that any of the larger Utah resorts would be able to accommodate.

If you come out here you should definitely give Snowbird and Snowbasin a try. Both have some sphincter puckering groomed runs.
post #14 of 20
If you come to Tahoe and do stuff with TASS at Alpine Meadows, I'm sure you could convince AlpineDad and me to push/tow your sit-skiing ass on a hike or two. We need more adaptive skiers hitting High Traverse!
post #15 of 20
I just edited this post- It pissed me off that PCMR didn't do anything for, let's call 'em special skiers- in my family's case, Multiple Sclerosis- but I talked to Tracy Meier at the National Ability Center in Park City and she filled me in- just goes to show, if you don't get the answer you like, talk to the supervisor. Here's the PCMR deal:

Special skier pays full price- but companion gets free lift ticket at National Ability Center's office in the double wide at the bottom of First Time lift. So, bring a buddy, split the ticket and go rip.

Deer Valley will give you a ticket for half price and a companion ticket free. Ask at ticket office, no need to go through NAC. Score another one for D.V.

I haven't checked the other Utah resorts, but I will.

It's been a few years, but I skied at Vail and Beaver Creek a few years ago, free for both the skier and companion, thanks to the Jimmy Huega Center's good work.
post #16 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sinecure View Post
If you come to Tahoe and do stuff with TASS at Alpine Meadows, I'm sure you could convince AlpineDad and me to push/tow your sit-skiing ass on a hike or two. We need more adaptive skiers hitting High Traverse!
I'd be happy to pitch in on that hike.
post #17 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sinecure View Post
If you come to Tahoe and do stuff with TASS at Alpine Meadows, I'm sure you could convince AlpineDad and me to push/tow your sit-skiing ass on a hike or two. We need more adaptive skiers hitting High Traverse!
Judging from the thread in the Bootfitters, I don't think this is a sit-skier. The sentiment is great though and I share it.
post #18 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cirquerider View Post
Judging from the thread in the Bootfitters, I don't think this is a sit-skier. The sentiment is great though and I share it.
Cool. Then we can just lead. That's easier on the body.
post #19 of 20
Thread Starter 

not a bucket skier

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cirquerider View Post
Judging from the thread in the Bootfitters, I don't think this is a sit-skier. The sentiment is great though and I share it.
I tried sit skiing and wore out a whole crew. No I prefer to stand up while I still am able. I ski with outriggers (crutches with little skis) instead of poles. They help me to make turns and to stay up.

I have actually skied with TASS at AM and found it great. They have a great facility and some of the best instructors in the US. It snowed about 4 feet when I was there and visability was poor for most of the days but when the sun came out it was grand. I ended up on Devil's Fiddle by mistake but got down after a long time. Alpine Bowl was probably my fav. steep and long.
post #20 of 20
You need to hook up with T-Square (Terry Terry). He is one of the moderators here and an adaptive instructor in the East. Great guy, I got to finally ski with him at the Aspen ESA last year. Send him a PM and hook up this winter. He is in New Hampshire not far from you. I'd bet you could swap some good ideas.

This is Terry on the right next to Bob Barnes (center) and ssh (right)




In class


Outriggers

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