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Crank bearing repack

post #1 of 23
Thread Starter 
Well my bike used to creak now and then going up hills.

Yesterday I went for a ride, and every time I push down on the left pedal the bike goes Cr - Cr- Cr-eak- k. I'm pretty sure it wasn't my knee.

Last time I tried this I was 10 years old and the bearings ended up all over the dusty dirt floor of the shed.

I need to be guided through this with photos. Maybe I can get away with just putting some grease in their, but more likely some new parts will be required.

Oh, it's a Raleigh Grand Prix
post #2 of 23
There are so many kinds of bottom brackets. Need more info.

There are also so many other things that could be creaking. Pedal, seatpost, broken frame, etc....
post #3 of 23
Last time I had some creaking it was driving me nuts, turned out it was the crank arm to the spindle..added a little grease and tightened it up, creaking gone.
post #4 of 23
Edit: what year Raleigh GP and does it have cottered cranks?

Second question: do you have a cotter pin press?

Sheldon's page
post #5 of 23
Is it a clack or a creak? Clacks tend to be pitted bearings, creaks due to auto bonding of crank arms and cup threads. Creaks are more common and can be cured by taking off the arms, and tweaking the cups.

If it is an old cottered crank, take the crankset out and shoot it.
post #6 of 23
Thread Starter 
It looks like this

I don't think I will have too much difficulty with the pin, as I had to tighten the nut a while ago.
post #7 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by newfydog View Post
If it is an old cottered crank, take the crankset out and shoot it.
Agree- and you will save several pounds as well if this is the case. You will need bottom bracket tools to do this, however. Your bike undoubtedly uses English thread BB cups, which should be easy to find. Good deals can be had this time of year, too.
post #8 of 23
That is an old style cottered crank. If you do not want to replace the entire thing (bottom bracket and crankset) you will need to take the crank arms off to repack the bearings. You do not need to take out the fixed (right side) cup to do this. I agree that the likely source of the sound is the crank arm-spindle interface, which may not be easily cured if it is all corroded and rusted. As it wears it is harder and harder to snug up with the cotter pin. If you can find a gently used Sugino or Shimano alloy cotterless crankset and bottom bracket (should be under $40) you might find that is your best option. And give that thing a bath!!
post #9 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post
It looks like this
Ah. '76?

Quote:
I don't think I will have too much difficulty with the pin,
Getting it out, probably not. It's seating it back in that's the PITA.

Quote:
as I had to tighten the nut a while ago.
'zackly. Wanna bet those ramps aren't squeaky clean anymore?
post #10 of 23
Yep. Historical value, but one of the worst inventions ever. Right up there with early Marker bindings.
post #11 of 23
Top disassembly tip: stick a big magnet on the BB before you loosen anything.

This applies to wheel hubs also.
post #12 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by newfydog View Post
Yep. Historical value, but one of the worst inventions ever. Right up there with early Marker bindings.
Perhaps Spademan is a better analogy!
post #13 of 23
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by dp View Post
That is an old style cottered crank. If you do not want to replace the entire thing (bottom bracket and crankset) you will need to take the crank arms off to repack the bearings. You do not need to take out the fixed (right side) cup to do this. I agree that the likely source of the sound is the crank arm-spindle interface, which may not be easily cured if it is all corroded and rusted. As it wears it is harder and harder to snug up with the cotter pin. If you can find a gently used Sugino or Shimano alloy cotterless crankset and bottom bracket (should be under $40) you might find that is your best option. And give that thing a bath!!
By crank arm-spindle interface, I take it you mean where the pedal arm fits onto the crank, with the pin that had a nut that to be tightened up. Yes? In that case not much I can do to fix it.

However I think if I remove the round nut from the frame after removing the left side pedal arm and with a drop sheet underneath, I may be able to put some grease inside there. The bearings are likely shot.

$40 bucks. I think I'll just ride my old bike (Supercycle Medalist Series II) instead.
post #14 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by dp View Post
Perhaps Spademan is a better analogy!
I thought about that one, but they were pretty rare. Markers were everywhere, just like those awful cranks.
post #15 of 23
Still riding mine just fine, praise VAR.
post #16 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post
By crank arm-spindle interface, I take it you mean where the pedal arm fits onto the crank, with the pin that had a nut that to be tightened up. Yes? In that case not much I can do to fix it.
yes- that is the primary failure point for these cranks. You can take it off, put some anti-seize on it and see if that helps.
However I think if I remove the round nut from the frame after removing the left side pedal arm and with a drop sheet underneath, I may be able to put some grease inside there. The bearings are likely shot.
This is worth doing in any case- I am sure that the thing will run a lot smoother with newly greased bearings. rather than just shooting some grease in, you should take the thing apart, clean it and repack the bearings. It is messy but not a particularly difficult job. Use the magnet trick described above to avoid having the loose bearings (if they are loose- sometimes they are in a little metal cage) from falling into the down tube and seat tube of the frame where they will be incredibly frustrating to retrieve).
$40 bucks. I think I'll just ride my old bike (Supercycle Medalist Series II) instead.
Never hurts to take a look on ebay- there are a couple of sets on there now selling for about $5; there are 2-3 days left on the auction, but maybe you will get lucky. Also, try your local bike shop. They might have some old stuff sitting around in the back they want to get rid of.
post #17 of 23
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by comprex View Post
Top disassembly tip: stick a big magnet on the BB before you loosen anything.

This applies to wheel hubs also.
Where exactly should I place the magnet? I'm not familiar with any of the terminology. BB= ball bearing to me. Bearing Brace? What?
post #18 of 23
Crank Arm= the part between the pedal and the bottom bracket (bb)
Bottom Bracket= the bearing assembly that is inside the frame.
post #19 of 23
two websites that may give you useful information (perhaps more than you want to know!)
http://sheldonbrown.com/raleigh26.html
http://www.sheldonbrown.com/cotters.html
post #20 of 23
One option not listed on the 26tpi page is the Mavic 610/616, no threads required.

Of course, he could just use a JIS spindle AND crank off a thrift store Diamondback or similar. Oh, wait, he could use the 27" aluminum rims off of one of those too.

EDIT: On a serious note, Ghost, you should know about Loose Screws:
http://www.loosescrews.com/index.cgi...d=701125218317
post #21 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post
$40 bucks. I think I'll just ride my old bike instead.
Your old bike? You mean this one?


post #22 of 23
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by epic View Post
Your old bike? You mean this one?


Those new-fangled High boys are dangerous! This is more like it.
post #23 of 23
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