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Q Ring Rotor Chainrings

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 
Anybody finding some love for these elliptical chainrings? I have talked to a few people lately that run them on road, time trial and mountain bikes and rave about them, including Ned Overend. He was riding them two years ago when he took second behind Tyler Hamilton in the Mt. Washington Hillclimb, and Ned was 51 at the time. If you are are using them where do you have them set?

Sorry if this has been covered before, but I did a search and didn't find anything.
post #2 of 16
I've never used 'em, but quite a few big name pros are having success with them. It makes me laugh at the condemnation that biopace still gets. I rode biopace and liked it. Rotors are a lot of $$$ though.
post #3 of 16
Thread Starter 
I believe they are about the same price as Dura Ace chainrings, and they are not the same as the old Biopace, which were oval but not elliptical.
post #4 of 16
Same general idea though

I think Bobby Julich uses them too.
post #5 of 16
I like them too.
post #6 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by mudfoot View Post
I believe they are about the same price as Dura Ace chainrings, and they are not the same as the old Biopace, which were oval but not elliptical.
Biopace was neither oval or elliptical. More of a rounded off parallelogram.
post #7 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by telerod15 View Post
Biopace was neither oval or elliptical. More of a rounded off parallelogram.
Yup, luv'em (Biopace that is, the exact opposite of Q-rings).

And no, I've never tried rotating Biopace forward on a crankarm.
post #8 of 16
Comprex, do you use them in the intended orientation? I remember some people liked to rotate them.

Haha, I see you edited your post already, in anticipation of my question.
post #9 of 16
A friend of mine had elliptical chain rings on his bike, and really liked them. Unfortunately someone stole them. They didn't bother to cut the lock and take the bike; they just stole the crank and pedals and chain rings. He didn't like them enough to buy new ones, saying they would only be stolen again.
post #10 of 16
I have a set I bought them and never bothered putting them on until after one long ride when a couple of chain ring bolts on my XTR crank set loosened and I ended up chewing the crap out of the rings as they wobbled back and forth, unbeknownst to me.

I put them on, and after fiddling with them for hours to get the repositioning and adjustment of the front changer just right, I got them working fairly well. The biggest positive I found is that shifting rings is much more positive than before. I rarely miss a shift... one click on the lever and boom, the chain shifts.

I honestly can't say whether I've noticed a performance improvement or not. I have noticed, however, that when I lock out my rear shock there is quite a sensation of bobbing/surging, but when the rear suspension is active, everything is smooth. It makes me wonder if the suspension is absorbing the power that the rings are designed to create and negating the benefit. Hard to say.

Regarding the comparison to Biopace, from what I understand, the power position of the Q Rings is in the opposite position to Biopace, so they really aren't comparable. There is about a 90 degree difference in where the tallest part of the rings are, between the two.
post #11 of 16
That, actually, is a really good point. Frame stiffness would play a role even with roadies.

Wouldn't it be funny if these worked better on 30 pound gaspipe frames (hey, they ARE stiff) than on modern CF?
post #12 of 16
Would an SRM be able to measure power gains from these rings?

If you had an SRM and a PowerTap on the same bike and they showed the same numbers with normal rings would you see a change in one or both when changing to QRinggs?
post #13 of 16
Thread Starter 
I believe there are no problems using them with a power meter. The concept is that they smooth out your spin, but also have you actually pushing a higher gear at the powerful part of the spin and a smaller gear at the dead spot. The Q rings have 5 settings and the people I talked to said that once you get them set right you can push a bigger gear on climbs. It it most noticeable if you pedal with just one foot. It feels smooth instead of uneven like with round rings. If you use them on a TT bike you can move the rings to compensate for the powerful part of you spin being farther forward because of your body position.
post #14 of 16
This is what I was thinking of, the question being whether the Qrings result in significantly greater bottom bracket and vertical flex:

http://kirkframeworks.com/Flex.htm
http://www.bikethink.com/Frameflex.htm
post #15 of 16
Thread Starter 
I have no data to back it up, but I would think that the smoother your spin the less bb and frame flex. One guy I talked to at length said that the Q-Ring effect was most noticeable when standing on his road bike because of how much it smoothed things out. I gotta believe that would result in less bb lateral flex.
post #16 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by mudfoot View Post
I have no data to back it up, but I would think that the smoother your spin the less bb and frame flex.
Not disputed in essence, but IMO limited in practice as perfect "smoothness" just ain't gonna happen with our design legs. Not that I actually believe frame flex is all bad in a road frame; since these things don't have lossy shock absorbers imo there is quite a good chance the frame flex itself smooths things out.


Quote:
One guy I talked to at length said that the Q-Ring effect was most noticeable when standing on his road bike because of how much it smoothed things out. I gotta believe that would result in less bb lateral flex.
I don't really see that it would affect lateral BB flex much at all.

I see it as having -great- potential to cause larger horizontal torque at the BB:



Which might make me wonder whether the bike frame your friend rides might just be really really good at returning the increased energy (at his standing cadence and down force) to the rear wheel.
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