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post #1 of 20
Thread Starter 
I Dare You to Try This!

But please, please, please be careful!
post #2 of 20
Lisa, I thought he was going to have skis on the Ball
post #3 of 20
Ha I just happened to have just finished my Bosu workout. Hadn't ever tried that particular exercize so I thought I'd go back to my (basement) gym and try it out.

Hmmm.... piece of cake

C'mon Lisa, challenge me
post #4 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lisamarie View Post
I Dare You to Try This!

But please, please, please be careful!
bwa! Turn the bosu's upside down to make it really difficult


I'm kidding of course.


That looks like a good one! My wife is a personal trainer/pilates instructor and we have a few bosus laying around. I'll have to try it. Thanks!

(I do like using upside down Bosus for balance training...squatting on them though..no jumping )
post #5 of 20
Thread Starter 
Curious to see what she thinks! BTW, I linked to PM Gear my Examiner Ski Page.

Might ask you for an interview at some point.
post #6 of 20
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mkevenson View Post
Lisa, I thought he was going to have skis on the Ball
post #7 of 20
Wow... I hope this doesn't sound too harsh, but this exercise is so potentially dangerous and ineffective I'm going to call it out... This exercise is scary on so many levels, yet would demonstrate so little transfer to actual skiing.

What are you trying to train here, and what are the risks? I'm sure most Trainers would call this a 'balance' exercise. Balance is a skill that is very situational specific. There is no transfer from one balance situation to another novel balance situation. Lots of research backs this up if you want to take the time to do a medline or sport discus search. Balance is specific to the situation and motor program it is developed for, and this surely will not enhance balance in the way the trainer hopes it might in the sport of skiing.

What risk does it involve? The person demonstrating this exercise doesn't show a great deal of control through the movement. He is frequently attempting to find his center of gravity. The injury risk is surely higher than the benefits of such training. I can see ankles rolling, and injury shouldn't be a part of effective training. This is the problem with 'functional training'. It is a good idea that was turned into a circus act.

The quote from Andy Walsh is also out of context from what he said in relation to the article and exercise. The Bosu is a useful tool, and that is surely what Andy was saying. To use it this way is to invite injury, and I have never seen Andy recommend it's usage in this way in the past.

Just because it is hard to do doesn't make it a good idea, or good training. I call this kind of training- 'stupid human tricks'. I can do push up with a clap while my hands and feet are both balanced on 2 swiss balls? Good idea? Not one I would reccomend to anyone. This is the sort of stuff that even JC Santana (well known 'functional' trainer) would surely advise against. He himself tore his ACL falling off a ball while giving a talk. He stood on the ball, and advised the group that 'this is the dumbest thing you can do on a ball' before he fell off. I guess he made his point.

This is functional training at it's most injury prone, and least productive. Please don't try this at home.
post #8 of 20
NE Racer: You think that was dangerous? I don't agree.

Now, when I stand on a swiss ball in the gym - that's dangerous. It totally freaks people out. I should take a picture of how I do it though. I put it up next to an I-beam column and stay very close to the column with my hands ready to grab the column if I start to lose it (I never have).

Now these are dangerous, but very cool to watch:

Six Foot Jump Onto Swiss Ball

and

Same Dude Jumping Ball-to-Ball with an oops at the end.


I'm going to have to go try that BOSU exercise this afternoon. I have another BOSU exercise I do at the gym that I like. It requires 3+ BOSUs so its probably not practical for most folks at home. I set up the BOSUs in a line, ball side up, with a gap of about 3ft between them. Then I jump from one to the next, making sure to settle and balance on each one. Its similar to the above exercise, only you can increase the gap to make it more challenging.

I also use the BOSU when I'm doing upper body workouts. I'll put it ball side down and stand one-footed on the BOSU while I do arm curls or other lifts with dumbells. It makes the curls less boring. I switch legs when I switch arms.
post #9 of 20
It's dangerous. No doubt about it. So is standing on a ball. Whatever training stimulus you are getting out of doing things like this can be done in a safer fashion. Whenever there is a safer way to do something training while elliciting the same qualities that is the road that must be taken.

I'm not just arbitrarily calling this exercise out. Strength and Conditioning/Training is what I do for a living. There are safer way to work on body awareness/proprioception, or to develop agility.

The Bosu is a useful tool, but even useful tools can be used in dangerous or ineffective ways.
post #10 of 20
NE, can you recommend some good balancing exercises? Thanks.
post #11 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jimski View Post
NE, can you recommend some good balancing exercises? Thanks.

do yourself a favor & find a qualified trainer / coach to work with in person.........
post #12 of 20
That is good advice- finding a 'qualified' Trainer to work with would be the best bet for developing a program safely and effectively. I would suggest a Trainer with a degree in an exercise science related field, and certification from the NSCA, ACSM, or NASM. There are far too many unqualified 'Trainers' out there putting together ridiculous programs. I wouldn't settle for anything less in terms of education and certification.

You could find some good exercise and program ideas at

www.strengthcoach.com

www.coreperformance.com

Mike Boyle and Mark Verstaggen both really know their stuff, and good information can be found at their websites (those I listed above).

Individual exercise or program recomendation would be difficult to prescribe without knowing more about you (IE- Injuries and illness, fitness level, and goals). But, you can find some general information at those websites that is credible.

Hope this is helpful.
post #13 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by NE Racer View Post
That is good advice- finding a 'qualified' Trainer to work with would be the best bet for developing a program safely and effectively. I would suggest a Trainer with a degree in an exercise science related field, and certification from the NSCA, ACSM, or NASM. There are far too many unqualified 'Trainers' out there putting together ridiculous programs. I wouldn't settle for anything less in terms of education and certification.

.
The fact that somebody has a bunch of letters after their name does not magically turn them into great trainers.They need to have the 'eye'
The gym i used to belong to had a couple of CSCS trainers.
Watching them with their clients was painful to say the least. There was no great fitness happening
post #14 of 20
Thanks to all who replied. I already do cardio, core, and upper body strengthening exercises, but was looking specifically to add a few balancing exercises to my routine. There's been a few articles recently that sense of balance deteriorates with age. For example: http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn...080901280.html

NE, I couldn't tell from your first message whether you thought exercises with a bosu ball (or its ilk), if done properly, are worthwhile or just a fad.

Any further thoughts are welcome.
post #15 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jimski View Post
Thanks to all who replied. I already do cardio, core, and upper body strengthening exercises, but was looking specifically to add a few balancing exercises to my routine. There's been a few articles recently that sense of balance deteriorates with age. For example: http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn...080901280.html

NE, I couldn't tell from your first message whether you thought exercises with a bosu ball (or its ilk), if done properly, are worthwhile or just a fad.

Any further thoughts are welcome.
For balance work out as much as possible in bare feet,try closing your eyes while exercising and as your article said ,train on one leg .
Also pick heavy stuff up off the ground and put it over your head. Something that is missing in todays kinder and gentler fitness world.
No need to play around on wobbly things unless it makes you happy
post #16 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by loboskis View Post
The fact that somebody has a bunch of letters after their name does not magically turn them into great trainers.They need to have the 'eye'
The gym i used to belong to had a couple of CSCS trainers.
Watching them with their clients was painful to say the least. There was no great fitness happening
This is true- just because one is a CSCS doesn't mean they will be a great Trainer. I've met Doctors who didn't appear all that competent either. I'm still glad we require all of them to go to med school and pass boards. It's only a minimal competency, like certification in this case (although certification is very minimal IMHO). I would reccomend NSCA certs along with the other certs I mentioned in combination with a Degree in an Exercise Science related field. I think most of the 'eye' you mention comes from education. Ask most Trainers to name all the muscles of the rotator cuff, and their actions. See what you get for an answer. Yet, their client is doing shoulder work... Ask if they can name all the hip flexors, and what roles within the group and it's actions they play. You'll get a blank stare most of the time. Yet, the same Trainer will be doing hip flexor work, or claiming 'imbalances' there without knowing the fundamental parts. How can you work on a car engine without knowing the parts? I think at least looking for a credible certification along with education will avoid some of these unqualified Trainers. There are too many fly by night 'Trainers' out there doing more harm than good with their ignorance. I think Mike Boyle said it best in a conference I saw him at (paraphrasing him here), 'In this field (Training)- if you don't know anatomy than you are an idiot.'

I hope this doesn't sound harsh. It's buyer beware with Trainers out there. Look for those who have at least invested in their knowledge base aside from an unreputable certification. It is time well spent.

Jimski- I believe the Bosu has it's place. It's a useful tool for some purposes. I just wouldn't get carried away with it. Instability in it's various forms has it's place in a program, but it shouldn't overwhelm everything else.
post #17 of 20
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jimski View Post
Thanks to all who replied. I already do cardio, core, and upper body strengthening exercises, but was looking specifically to add a few balancing exercises to my routine. There's been a few articles recently that sense of balance deteriorates with age. For example: http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn...080901280.html

NE, I couldn't tell from your first message whether you thought exercises with a bosu ball (or its ilk), if done properly, are worthwhile or just a fad.

Any further thoughts are welcome.
Like anything else, it's a question of progression. As I implied in my original post (perhaps without enough emphasis) is that you would need to be very skilled and well aligned to try something of this nature. In general, the first stages of any balance training program would involve basic postural alignment and core activation. And you'd be amazed at how many people try to perform highly advanced balance exercise without a clue as to how to activate their deeper core muscular.

The bad news, they can sometimes get away with it, because the stronger muscles will over compensate. But that's not dynamic balance. That's, as Weems calls it, bracing.

In general, people should start with simple balance exercises without the use of equipment. You can progress by performing them with your eyes closed, and then gradually adding balance training "toys."

However, you do need to continuously challenge challenge your skills. That's where the bosu and other devices become appropriate. But even then, there's a thin line between balance training and stupid human tricks, such as those seen in this video:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vHPHPO1jAIQ

I once took a workshop with Juan Carlos Santana, another one of the great trainers in the sports medicine industry. He spoke about the time he was lecturing to a group of physical therapists, who wanted to know why standing on a stability ball was a very bad idea. Unfortunately, he decided to demonstrate the exercise as a means of proving why it was not effective, and ended up tearing his ACL. Considering that Santana has the balance skills of a circus performer, that's pretty serious.
post #18 of 20
[quote=NE Racer;959123] I think at least looking for a credible certification along with education will avoid some of these unqualified Trainers. There are too many fly by night 'Trainers' out there doing more harm than good with their ignorance. I think Mike Boyle said it best in a conference I saw him at (paraphrasing him here), 'In this field (Training)- if you don't know anatomy than you are an idiot.'

I hope this doesn't sound harsh. It's buyer beware with Trainers out there. Look for those who have at least invested in their knowledge base aside from an unreputable certification. It is time well spent.

quote]
Not harsh at all,your right on the money. The 'training field' is full of fly by nights. As are some 'certifying bodies'.
you can bet infraspinatis on it
post #19 of 20
[quote=Lisamarie;959149]Like anything else, it's a question of progression. As I implied in my original post (perhaps without enough emphasis) is that you would need to be very skilled and well aligned to try something of this nature. In general, the first stages of any balance training program would involve basic postural alignment and core activation. And you'd be amazed at how many people try to perform highly advanced balance exercise without a clue as to how to activate their deeper core muscular.

I would argue that there is no safe progression that ends with this exercise. Balance is not a transferable skill. There is a great deal of research that backs this fact up.

The JC Santana story that you mentioned (as I had previously in this thread) is a prime example of why is type of exercise is silly. Hoping for balance enhancement from such a modality is futile as well. Kinesthetic awareness, or agility-perhaps, but not balance. There are surely safer ways to develop body awareness or agility, though.

I'm sure JC Santana, Mike Boyle, and Eric Beard would agree that this exercise has more negatives than positives.

I'm curious though... Would you use this as part of a Training program?
post #20 of 20
Thread Starter 
Would I use it? No, I would not. Although my clients are extremely fit, this is not within the range of their skill set. With over 25 years of teaching, I've never had a student injured in my classes, and I would prefer to keep my clean record. As a matter of fact, I've only had one injury throughout my entire fitness career, and it didn't happen while working out; it happened on the slopes.

That said, there are probably people who can do this, and may benefit. On a relative scale, I think it's safer than the video I showed in my second post.
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