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Am I crazy - 70mm waist in powder? - Page 3

post #61 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by DropKickMurphy View Post
I don't think it's a bad idea to rent/demo the fat skis on your trips out West. At least if you have never actually skied on fat/powder skis before.
This and what follows is an obscenity that should have been deleted by the moderator. Facts and figures will just cloud your mind. Epic's official stance on this: "No quiver is ever large enough." Suggest you PM Trekchick for immediate counseling.
post #62 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by beyond View Post
This and what follows is an obscenity that should have been deleted by the moderator. Facts and figures will just cloud your mind. Epic's official stance on this: "No quiver is ever large enough." Suggest you PM Trekchick for immediate counseling.
I'd be embarrassed to show Trekchick how small my quiver is.

Seriously, the new airline baggage policies do have an effect on the "buy/rent" question. Especially for an easterner who takes 1 western trip per year.

I have Fisher Watea 84's and RX-8's. I think that covers me for pretty much any conditions in the northeast. When I head out to Alta for a week next February, I'll bring the Wateas and will rent/demo fat skis when the conditions warrant.
post #63 of 72
Everyones priorities are different. If money is no object, go for the new Mid-Fats (Low/Mid 90's Like Phil says).

Otherwise, bring your allstars & hit the free demo tents while your there. If you find a fat demo you like, and you get the snow, then rent it.

I brought allstars out west last year and they were fine for the majority of the time we were there...but it was March. I did demo some fat skis while I was there, and believe me they were nice on powder.

Financially, can't justify a new purchase ... but if I could !!!
post #64 of 72
Go for it. A pair of wider and longer skis will open up a whole lot more terrain when you go west. Just how wide and long is up to opinion, personal preference and what experience you wantto optomize. Read enough on this form and you will learn what characteristics in a ski make it best for different conditions.

I ski in the upper midwest and ski and picked up pair of Volkl Explosives ($200 at a swap a few years ago)(183 cm/95mm I think) for my trips out west. One of the best things I have done. It opens up much more of the mountain. When on the mountain I want to experience things I do not get at home. So I will hike, climb or traverse if needed to find the snow with some challenge. Rarely will I find much pristine powder (the locals get that) so I do not need a dedicated power ski. The Exploder seems to handle the left over, broken up powder and crud just fine. It is also stable in the steep chutes that often are not powder but soft snow.

I used to take both my carver and the Exploders, just in case! Now I just take the Exploders, look for the steep and deep, but if that is not available, I find they are lots of fun even on the wide and long groomers that are often soft in the mountains.

So read the suggestions in this thread, read other threads, look for a bargin and pull the trigger. You will not regret it.

P.S. I am presently sniffing out the Volkl Gotama. Hard to find a bargin on those tho.
post #65 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by skugrud View Post
Go for it. A pair of wider and longer skis will open up a whole lot more terrain when you go west. It opens up much more of the mountain. .
There will be a big closed sign. "Do even think about going out here without some really fat ski!"
post #66 of 72

Equivalent Float Chart reference

Found this discussion in a search and just wanted to comment that I think skier weight is an important component to this discussion. If you do a search on ski width and float you'll find lots of relevant discussion. Here's a thread started by PhysicsMan a long time ago that, while only a gross approximation, make the point well:

http://forums.epicski.com/showthread.php?t=521
post #67 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Peters View Post
Absolutely super to both of you.

My tongue is getting really CHEWED UP with all the biting I'm doing these days refraining from guffawing at the concept that MOST powder skiing that people do at ski resorts these days requires skis of over 75mm in width.

Come on!

Even at the Valhalla of powder skiing... Alta... how many days of an average ski season do you see more than 12" of new snow every day? How many days at the REST of United States ski resorts do you see more than 8" or so of new snow? Do you really mean to tell me that "normal" powder skiing at most US ski resorts requires skis that are almost TWICE as wide as what we used to ski on (at the SAME resorts) twenty years ago?

Please.

How long does untracked powder (or even good crud!!!!) last inbounds at most US ski resorts these days? Two hours? Four at the most?

I'm sorry, but I believe that anyone who feels a 100mm-or-more-waist ski is good for daily on-piste skiing just HAS NOT FELT or DOES NOT KNOW how much better a narrow-waisted ski performs on-piste.

There. I said it.

I freely admit that I'm old-school. All you new-schoolers can now return to your belief that wide skis perform well on MOST of the in-resort conditions you see on a day-to-day basis inside a ski resort.

Thanks for giving me the opportunity to write my annual rant about the trend toward wider and wider (and wider) skis. The idea of a ski with a 140cm width (or more!) just makes me smirk. This CAN'T be serious.

Arrrrrgh.
You should make this rant at Mt Baker. Not only make the rant go up there and log 100 days and see how many of them you spend on groomers. You do realize that Powder can be found at most any resort days after the storm right?
post #68 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkiNebraski View Post
You should make this rant at Mt Baker. Not only make the rant go up there and log 100 days and see how many of them you spend on groomers. You do realize that Powder can be found at most any resort days after the storm right?
Maybe so but you spend more and more time on skied snow or groomed searching for fewer and fewer stashes in the trees in between storms. I'd rather be on a MidFat or GS ski cruising around looking for little stashes.

I guess back before 1995 there was tons more powder stashes available because nobody had any skis capable of skiing on it
post #69 of 72
I think you answered your own question. Go rent a pair of fatties and find out for yourself. There's a proper tool for any given job. You wouldn't take a Porsche 911 offroading and you wouldn't drive a Hummer on the race track. I've skied skinnies in deep powder and done the short slow powder hop down the hill, it can be fun if you're feeling nostalgic. But you'll have a lot more fun with the proper tool.

Also fatties can be useful for more than just really deep days. I was skiing last winter with around a foot or so of fresh on the mountain and some geezer on old school sticks was bitching about how he kept getting knocked around by the crud underneath. Meanwhile I was floating on top in blissful bottomless heaven on my fatties. So who was having more fun?
post #70 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kevin M View Post
So I ski mostly in the northeast (VT, NY) with 1 week long trip out west a year.

Given my eastern skiing tendency, naturally I have a stiff set of carver skis, 168 Volkl Allstars, which just ROCK on hard pack.

This year I'm going to get more time (about 11 full days of skiing) in Colorado and Utah and I'm starting to ask myself if wider skis will improve my off piste powder experience?

So should I be looking to rent wider skis on snowy days? How wide should I go while still maintaining some on piste capability?

I still have a blast in the powder with my "narrow" 70mm waisted skis and love the fact that I can jump on the groomer and aggresively carve. What should I look to try for fun this winter, for powder skiing purposes?
Modern technology give some of the new mid-fats (76-85mm) just as much edge hold as your 70mm waisted skis, most will also ski powder much easier. If you don't want to go to a quiver, you shoud demo some skis in this range for an all-purpose ski.
What a lot of posters on this thread (except Bob Peters) don't think about is what happens after the powder's gone. Many times on the east coast, 2 hours after opening, we're left with powder bumps with 20 feet of glare ice in betweeen. I'll still be holding with my 80mm skis, but I can't imagine skiing that with 90+mm waisted skis.
post #71 of 72
Wow! Three pages of replies and I have to go back to 2004 when I posted a trip report after skiing my 6 Stars in deep pow. They were pretty good as I recall, but then again, I had never experienced a wider ski at that point. For any three dimensional snow you need 90+ mm at the waist and wider just seems to get better and better. I still get a chuckle out of this. Short Six Stars on Pow:







LOL Irul&ublo gave me such grief for using my daughter's skis:



No float, lots of work. Do yourself a favor and get a 100 mm ski. You may end up using it all the time. FWIW, I will take a powder day on short narrow skis any day of the week for fun, but it just gets so much better with the right equipment.
post #72 of 72
Funny how things have changed in just a few years.

In 2003-04 I skied powder days with a pair of 64mm Atomic C9's. People would see me heading off into the trees off trail at Heavenly and look at me strangely like where's that guy going? The upside was there would be fresh lines days after a storm.

In 2004-05 I used a pair of 85mm K2 Fujatives to ski 85 days of powder heaven when Kirkwood got 847 inches of snow for the season. That was the year Tahoe got 19 feet in 12 days around the holidays and people were sliding out of their second story windows because the first story was buried.

In 2005-06 I used a pair of 87mm Volkl Karmas as my main powder ski. Kirkwood got 861 inches for the season. The Karmas were plenty wide to ski in the 5 or 6 foot post storm drifts.

Now if I show up in a lift line at the big K on a powder morning with any of those skis I'd get laughed off the mountain. Everyone and their grandma are rocking 100mm+. The downside is with so many people turning into powder pigs I'm hiking for my turns and going BC by mid-day.
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