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tidy floors/wax shavings

post #1 of 26
Thread Starter 
How do you keep your floor surfaces free of wax shavings?

Any tips or hints?

I had just swept the concrete floor of the basement till now ..... but now that I need to paint and watercoat the floors and walls, it hit me that I'll have to get the ground in wax out of the concrete.

Any old piece of carpet? I just never liked that because of the fire hazard?

A catch "shelf" or tray below the bench?

post #2 of 26
Couple years ago I didn't clean the garage floor well. Wife slipped and nearly cracked her head on my bench.

I scrape outside now.

Wax on inside, wax off outside. Side benefit it that the beer stays colder.

A good degreaser and scrub brush should clean your floor up ok.
post #3 of 26
I screwed a vinyl rain gutter on the front of my bench, and also put an anti-fatigue mat on the floor the full length of my bench.

post #4 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by U.P. Racer View Post
I screwed a vinyl rain gutter on the front of my bench, and also put an anti-fatigue mat on the floor the full length of my bench.


+1 on the anti-fatigue mat. Pretty cheap at Pepboys, saves the back and the wax doesn't really stick so sweeping up is easy. I made a really slick spot at my parent's before I thought to relocate some of their mat...
post #5 of 26
The slick spot serves to keep your SO out of the ski room, and your new toys safe from prying eyes...
post #6 of 26
But the slick spot serves to keep your SO out of the ski room, and your toys safe from prying eyes...
post #7 of 26
-use minimal solid wax when dripping/hot touching (or use liquids)
-use absorbent fiberlene or shop towel with iron to remove excess wax
-place trash barrel under ski ends to collect most scrapings
-sealed concrete is easy to scrape, sweep or shop vac
-wax remover does
-fatigue mat looks like a nice addition as does the gutter approach, coupled with bench brush

or this bad boy (Wax Razor):



post #8 of 26
Thread Starter 
Normally, I snub my nose at tools but that Wax Razor looks like the perfect thing for those .... hotel room wax over the sink jobs ...



Ah! The rain gutter and mat combo ... looks like a winner!

And it never hit me .... I've been out putting huck rivets in the gutters all freakin week to tighten them up before winter! Duh!

That and the floor degreaser ... I've been embarassed to post this for fear of getting tagged a "anal" ... but those mucked in wads of wax and drifting shavings also have been threatening my sump pump.

post #9 of 26
I put down some industrial carpet runner that I got from Lowes. The wax does get caught in the rough brostles of the rug, but you can vac a lot out afterwards. Id does clog after awhile, but I have only replaced them 3x in 15 years... its about $2 a foot for about 15-20 feet.

The rain gutter idea is a forehead slapper... why didn't I think if that! ? I like the simplicity. Does it push you further away from the bench? probably only 3 1/2 inches or so... right? I am going to look into this very soon. I wax a lot of skis every week, and the old brush and barrel only works so well. I am very anal about keeping the side tuning tools away form the wax area, but I see myself losing a stone in the guttter or maybe catching my apron on it and spilling the wax everywhere anyway.

Yuki... try pair of old pantyhose over the sump intake. We used them at the shop for everytihng to sump filters, to the tub filter on the Montana machine when we ran out of their $22 a bag sock filters...
post #10 of 26
Thread Starter 
Chandy14 ..................

Excellent ........ !!

At first I was perplexed because I cut into the concrete and the floor flush .... but all I have to do is glue a few blocks onto the "bucket" about an inch down and rig a small wood frame for the panty hose to be stretched over.

Last year some scraps of paper and a few leaves had the pump clogged and when I looked at the wax droppings later it hit me they would destroy the pump.

The screen is a big winner and even if I get sloppy .... with the threat of flooding this week it had me sweating!
post #11 of 26
Cardboard- cheap, easy, disposable.

Hardwood floor retailers sell 4x8 sheets of cardboard that are used to protect new build (high end) floors for the time between install and close. I believe they are in the neighborhood of $5 per sheet at retail? If your really thrifty you can peruse the high end neighborhoods (think "trophy home" new builds) on garbage day as most simply toss them to the curb.
post #12 of 26
Build your shop in a "shop".... not a condo living room. Let the floor get dirty!!
post #13 of 26
Thread Starter 
It is in the basement "shop" area. It's so big I store my three canoes down there and still lots of room.

The problem is with poured concrete walls and floors. The stuff is thick and tough but still some minor settling cracks allow for "weeping" that during a long rain or ..... when you have snow/ice followed by a spring soaker ... the basememt will get like three inches of water.

So ..... it needs to get a waterproof paint/coating .... and the sump has to be kept sanitary.
post #14 of 26
If all else fails, at least you can stand in one of the canoes to do your spring tune!

I live on top of a hill, so **knock wood* not a lot of basement flooding problems, but I did paint all the walls and floors with "Drylock". It is a pain in the A$$ to get on the wall, and all in the cracks and holes, but it actually helped keep the basement dry even from the curing concrete. Good stuff.
post #15 of 26
Could get interesting standing in water (or a metal canoe in water) using an electrical iron. Be sure to wear your PFD.

Hope you have GFI outlets.
post #16 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yuki View Post
It is in the basement "shop" area. It's so big I store my three canoes down there and still lots of room.

The problem is with poured concrete walls and floors. The stuff is thick and tough but still some minor settling cracks allow for "weeping" that during a long rain or ..... when you have snow/ice followed by a spring soaker ... the basememt will get like three inches of water.

So ..... it needs to get a waterproof paint/coating .... and the sump has to be kept sanitary.
The house I used to rent was almost 100 yrs old, it leaked from everywhere and the landlord was too cheap to fix it the right way (dig up the foundation and reseal eveything). So he had an elevated subfloor installed. So water still flowed into the basement but now it traveled underneath the floors to a hole in the ground where the sewer service was located. Not the way I would do things, but I thought it was an ingenious solution.
post #17 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alpinord View Post
Could get interesting standing in water (or a metal canoe in water) using an electrical iron. Be sure to wear your PFD.

Hope you have GFI outlets.
Hey having water on the floors ensures no wax sticking. Similar to a water filled grease-catch tray.
post #18 of 26
Thread Starter 
Rich, it's a pretty new house and it only gets bad during real bad times.

Even with all the rain this weekend there wasn't a drop.

What I really need to do ..... but that is work .... if I wanted to, would be to dig right at the source of the cracks on the exterior and renew the parge (tar), coat on the concrete.

But .... a paint job would dress up the basement a bit too and make it brighter down there.
post #19 of 26
1) When I used to run a tuning workshop for a ski club, we had a large piece of outdoor carpet that was laid on the floor before setting up benches & supplies. The carpet was kind of a cheap astroturf, with a very low pile & a minimal but sturdy backing. The carpet kept shavings & drippings off the floor, and was a safe non-slip surface to work on. When the workshops were done, the carpet was cleaned up with a shopvac, and then the carpet was rolled up chimney-sweep style and the floor in the shared-use meeting room was left nice & clean for the next group.

2) A friend has a nice work area set up in his garage, with a kind of wooden slat platform in front of the filing/waxing bench. The platform is about 3' wide, 8' long, made of a bunch of 2"x2" wood pieces, fastened together with about 3/4" spaces between the slats. A lot of the metal & wax shavings fall between the slats, and the rest are swept off after work is done. Every once in a while, the platform is lifted & accumulated junk from underneath is cleaned up. The shavings are pretty easy to clean up because they haven't been walked on & ground into the floor.

I also keep a garbage can handy when scraping, & dump shavings that I can right into the garbage so there's less to clean up.
post #20 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yuki View Post
What I really need to do ..... but that is work .... if I wanted to, would be to dig right at the source of the cracks on the exterior and renew the parge (tar), coat on the concrete.
dug up a whole side of a foundation from grade down five feet to replace some drainage stuff this summer. good times!

I have a new "wax room" this year so I'm taking notes.
post #21 of 26
just built my toy box. 32x28 shop for skiing sleds and quads. I sealed the floor the day it was poured with a urethaneproduct fron Unicon. every thing sweeps up from oill to wax. Buy it from a concrete supply place and apply it with a insectcide sprayer. New of course. Excellent for any spills or clean up
post #22 of 26
Thread Starter 
The pump sprayer sounds like a winner too! Beats painting for sure.

And .... GFCI for sure

But .... you can still get zapped with a GFCI ... don't ask how I know this ... well .... when they were new I gut curious so I ...

Metal canoe? No Way ................

one 1929 Old Town cedar

one Old Town ... pac Solo made of royalex

one Mad River kevlar

I hate aluminium canoes .... they creep me out ....
post #23 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yuki View Post
Metal canoe? No Way ................

one 1929 Old Town cedar

one Old Town ... pac Solo made of royalex

one Mad River kevlar

I hate aluminium canoes .... they creep me out ....
Pics requested immediately!
post #24 of 26
Well what i do,

i just wax and do my stuff, then let it all get hard on the floor and get it off with a little knife. I am working in our garage though....

Bye
post #25 of 26

A story and a bit of a warning.

Last spring when I needed to prep my new skis, I decided to do it in the kitchen rather than the garage since the former had much better lighting and it was significantly warmer. The kitchen had a linoleum floor which I THOUGHT would work out fine.

When I was done waxing and scraping, it seemed fairly easy to sweep most of it up, but the floor always seemed a bit, how should I say this, slippery after all that. From now on I will lay a piece of old carpeting on the floor.

The real problem arose, though, when I found that some hot wax had dripped on the linoleum. I came up with the brilliant idea of using a 'warm' waxing iron and placing it on top of couple of sheets of that heavy duty blue workshop paper towel over the wax spot on the floor. The 'warm' iron would melt it and the towel soaked it up. That worked great UNTIL the phone rang. I answered it and forgot about the iron on the floor. BIG MISTAKE. I now have a brown square on the linoleum floor of my rental house. I'm still wondering how I will repair that.

Be careful.

Big Nick.
post #26 of 26
Thread Starter 
BigNick ...... easy ....

Just replicate the iron mark all over the place and make it look like a folksy pattern.

Just learn to put on a straight face when the grumpy landlady comes to check ....

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