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20 Years from Now

post #1 of 23
Thread Starter 
Ok, so the last 20 years has seen some pretty major changes in the ski industry. Take the rise of snowboarding, shaped skis, integrated ski/binding, clothing improvements, faster lifts, better grooming, parks, pipes etc.

Where will the ski industry be in 20 years? What will be the big innovations of the day? What current fads will be long gone? What will the new ones be?

[img]tongue.gif[/img]
post #2 of 23
Going skiing in Alaska 20 years from now:

1. Put on your gear.
2. Put on virtual reality gougles.
3. Flip the switch and you there, following Nobis around.

post #3 of 23
Yep, Eug, I'd have to agree with you (again) on that one, I hear there's a thing called the "Internet", that some people say will revolutionise everything. Can't see it myself, you know!
But I do thinkg virtual skiing, and indoor slopes are going to increase.

But here's another thought - what if someone comes up with artificial snow (being serious here, so keep up with me)
OK, not water frozen and sprayed like current man-made snow, but some sort of synthetic material with similar properties to snow that could be put on to slopes, allowing them to be open all year round and at all temperatures.

Just a thought.


S


Oh, and 20 years from now, Britain will still be celebrating Alain Baxter's bronze in the Olympics. (and England will still be singing "Football's Coming Home" and thinking of 1966!)
post #4 of 23
WTFH: "But here's another thought - what if someone comes up with artificial snow (being serious here, so keep up with me)"

Dow Corning produced something like this - a silicone based crystal - some years ago but I'm not sure what happened to it. (it certainly wasn't supposed to melt).
I agree that indoor snow has some way to go.
I think we're going to see a rise in x-country skiing, as people escape the zoo of overcrowded pistes.
post #5 of 23
<BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Wear the fox hat ?:
But here's another thought - what if someone comes up with artificial snow (being serious here, so keep up with me)
OK, not water frozen and sprayed like current man-made snow, but some sort of synthetic material with similar properties to snow that could be put on to slopes, allowing them to be open all year round and at all temperatures.
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

I guess my question would be, how do you get rid of it? Spraying artificial snow all over a mountain doesn't exactly follow "leave no trace" principals, does it?

I think it would be darn difficult to ensure the artifical snow doesn't harm plants and animals.
post #6 of 23
I wasn't thinking of something to get rid of, I was thinking of permanent (althought the surface would have to be pisted, or at least re-spread, every night, I guess.
There is the environmental side to it as well, but I'm hoping in the future, all those who don't care about the environment will have met their own fate, and gorged themseles to death, and scientists will have come up with an environmentally safe solution. But, hey, I live in a dream world. it's my dream, it's my world, and I like it here!

S
post #7 of 23
specialized "slush" skis, just for the melt...
post #8 of 23
Well for a start we will all commute to the ski fields (the ones that survived the nuclear war that is) in our flying cars. We will be wearing silver jump suits that protect us from solar radiation and keep us warm at the same time.
We will also need to wear SPF 2,000,000 sunscreen to avoid getting sun burned as there will not ozone layer at all. And……Snowboarding will have been proven to be a passing fad.

On a more serious note.

I think that seperate ski, boot and binding companies will be a thing of the past. There will be intergrated ski, binding and boot packages - foam liners take care of the boot fitting issues. And maybe better plastics.

Most skifields will not have spent much on development.

Ski fields everywhere will have had record snowfalls (might be wishful thinking).
post #9 of 23
20 years: HUD's will be integrated into goggles, skis will change flex and shape characteristics on demand, bindings will be magnetically based instead of mechanical, clothing will adapt its structure to the temperature and humidity . . . and I don't think any of this stuff is a long shot!

The bad news: the only skiing will be in the Andes, far northern Rockies, high Alps and Himalaya.
post #10 of 23
I predict we will be on long, say 205 cm narrow skis. We all will wear neon one-peice outfits, and fur.
post #11 of 23
As long as it's not fox fur, I don't mind!
post #12 of 23
<BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Todd M.:
HUD's will be integrated into goggles<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Likely to have helmet and goggles as an integrated unit with the heads-up display. Possible add on modules will be avy beacon and locator precisely indicating visually where to dig.

I'm sure skis will continue to evolve but I'm not sure how (maybe back to straight and narrow as Alta predicts). In 20 years the snowboard population will be maturing and creating their own "establishment" whether they believe it or not.

Lift tickets will have passed $100 per day (but I'll be skiing free at the age of 75) and it will be easy to spend $10000 on top of the line skis, boots and bindings.
post #13 of 23
<BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by PowderJunkie:
Lift tickets will have passed $100 per day (but I'll be skiing free at the age of 75) and it will be easy to spend $10000 on top of the line skis, boots and bindings.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

I'll buy the over $100 lift tickets. $10,000 on equipment, though, seems like a stretch. How much did people spend on top-of-the-line equipment 20 years ago? I bet it wasn't that far removed from what we pay now.

My bet would be no real MAJOR advances. Sure, the manufacturers will brag of huge breakthrough, but I just don't see anything radical.
post #14 of 23
Going back to straight and narrow? Maybe about the same time we go back from internal combustion engines to horse and buggy! :
post #15 of 23
20 yrs. from now people will still complain about ski boots that don't fit, thier own ego's will still make people buy the wrong skis and getting the right wax for that perfect glide will still be a shot in the dark half the time.
post #16 of 23
Rockskier is probably right on. There were many who whined that metal edges was cheating, and if you had them on your skis your were compensating for some lack of ski ability. Then it was metal poles. Then safety bindings- wow! non- macho here! Sissy! Then plastic boots. Oooo! man-made stuff! Non-natural! NO-no!
The more things change, the more they remain the same.
post #17 of 23
<BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by SkiKing:

$10,000 on equipment, though, seems like a stretch. How much did people spend on top-of-the-line equipment 20 years ago?
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

I went for shcok value and then doubled.

20 years ago? I'm trying to remember what I paid for Rossi FPs, Marker MRR and Nordicas "of the day". A rough guess, taking shopping around into account, is a maximum of $450 to $500. My most recent ski, binding and boot purchase was two years ago (Bandit XX, Marker 9.1SC and Nordica GP) and was in the $1350-$1500 range. Tripled in 20 years. Another triple would put it in the $4500 to $5000 range. But I'm not spending absolute top dollar. I still expect in 20 years it will be POSSIBLE to lay out $7500 to $10000 for equipment.

In 20 years the materials used in top of the line ski equipment will rival the unattainium used in bike frames of the day...
post #18 of 23
Thread Starter 
I totally agree with you re costs. The last time I paid full retail was about 10 years ago for K2 KVCs, about NZ$500, and bindings about $200. I remember thinking how ludicrously expensive that was. Salomon Scream 10 Pilots are NZ$2000 now I think (or very close - WITHOUT bindings, which are around $600-700 for top of the line. Bikes are a good analogy, the sky is the limit with them (witness the Colnago-Ferrari for about £10,000).
post #19 of 23
How would you mount a ski rack on a horse? Instead of snow plows we will have super-duper-pooper-scooper-sno-park passes.

We will go back to solid wood skis (environmentally safe) - screw-on edges you can replace if you lose an edge. Bear claw bindings for those who "don't want their skis to come off" - stretch pants will come back for that aero-dynamic look. Skiers will have to get a permission pass from snow-boarders to use the hill. Wheat germ, soy milk, tofu will be the bill of fare at the resorts. We'll have skier and boarder mom's instead of soccer moms... opps we have that already. A campaigning president will say, "Read my lips... no new ski areas!"

Just taking it away from technology for funners, here.
post #20 of 23
Thread Starter 
I think there will be 'adaptive' waxes that can cope with a much wider range of snow temp etc, and much better aerodynamic advances for racing gear. Also edges that don't wear down as fast and synthtic cores that make wood look lame. However, all these advances will be suppressed by the World Ski Federation that controls all ski areas in all countries as a branch of the World Government based in Moscow.
post #21 of 23
...Global warming will kick in. No more snow. And we'll move into hoverskis, just like the hoverboards in Back to the Future. [img]smile.gif[/img]


....
post #22 of 23
20 years from now....Lets see.

1. There will be fewer major resorts, owned by large conglomerates like they are today. The smaller less pretensious ones will be far enough away from urban/suburban centers so they won't be able to sell the land for homes, but they will have been in business at last since 1980, so all the major and basic investment costs have been written off, and therefore they can afford to stay in business, provided they are not carrying more than 30% debt as a ratio to toatal assets.

2. Lift tickets durung Xmas week at any major resort will be well over $100.00. Season passes will be over $2000.00, and nearby labor will be hard to come by at a reasonable expense due to the continue short fall of affordable housing in ski towns. You will be compelled to stay at these resorts so you can get a deal on eveything at a package rate price.Otherwise, only the very very wealthy will be able to afford to ski or ride.

3. It will be 75-80% riders no more than
25 % skiers.Exception being the new split snowboards [ see below.]

4. The median age of riders will be at least 15-20 years younger than for skiers.

5. Year around resorts will try to increase their market shares from a shrinking pie of skiers and boarders, with special marketing programs aimed at the very old Baby boomers, their own childrn and grand children.

6. Boots, bindings, and skis totaly integrated, and will cost at least $2000.00 for all three top of the line for the best.

7. Totally integretation of boots, step in bindings, and snow boards.

8. There will be a narrower, but slightly longer snowboards that can easily be separated into two separate boards and then you can ski them as short but fat styled skis.Your binding will also be a free heel one as well, if you so choose. Same boots and bindings for all the skiing and riding options or the splitable boards.

9. The 2022 Winter Olympics will be held in the Ural Mountains of Russia.

10. Only the wealthiest of countries will be able to have the winter Olympics due the continuing high cost of security.

11. There will only be three skiing publications, and at least 7 Snowboard publciations.

12. The "new School" approach to skiing will dominate future World Cup and Olympic competions with "X Game " Style of sports.

13. The appeals for reversing event outcomes will be ever increasing and burdensome to the games. If it continues, the Olympics will have to be revamped, or abondened to another time in histroy.
post #23 of 23
<BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by TheRockSkier:
Bikes are a good analogy, the sky is the limit with them (witness the Colnago-Ferrari for about £10,000).<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

The difference with bikes is there is a huge investment to get the best possible strength/weight ratio. There really isn't the need for this in skiing. The only real advantage of a light ski I can see is that they're easier to carry to your car!
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