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Burton Custom Advice

post #1 of 22
Thread Starter 
I am new to snowboarding, 30 yrs. skiing. My niece and nephew are making the switch and thought it would be fun to learn with them.
Me= 6'2", 190#, sz. 11 boot, 40yrs old,

Will probably get 20+ days for boarding.

I am fairly coordinated and athletic, lots of skateboard experience.

I work in a ski/board shop and have access to employee purchase privileges with Burton. My coworker recomended the following (he is used to outfitting experienced riders so I'm just checking his recomedndation). Also, he knows me as an expert skier so I'm not sure if he is taking this into consideration.
  • Burton Custom Wide ICS 167cm (too long?)
  • Cartel EST Bindings Large
  • Burton Ruler boot sz. 11
Also, in a perfect world I would borrow someones equipment and head out this winter. But, I have the access to sweet deals with Burton and would like to take advantage of it. I'm definitely charged up to take on the challenge and look forward to it!

Any advice or recomendations would be appreciated. Thanks!
post #2 of 22

Who you calling a Yankee?

Swamp,

The Custom is a board designed for experienced riders. If you've never ridden before or if you're still working on linking turns together, you may want to rent a beginner board (e.g. an "LTR" board through the Burton Learn To Ride program) for your first coule of visits. Beginner boards have a softer flex that makes them easier to bend a higher bevel that makes them more forgiving about catching the downhill edge. This will help you learn at a faster pace.

Because of your athletic background and skateboard experience, you have the potential to learn at a faster than normal pace. So with respect to the choice of equipment for ownership your shop has made an appropriate choice. At your height, weight and ability 167cm is not necessarily too long. You could go a little smaller, especially for riding in the Conn/NE region. If you wanted to spend more time in the park and pipe, then I would recommend going a size or 2 smaller.

As you get better and get the opportunity to demo other gear, you will get a better sense of what lengths work best for you. Advice is a poor substitute for experience, but if you have no experience, it's better than nothing.
post #3 of 22
Thread Starter 
Good advice, thanks. Think I'll pull the trigger on the Burton Custom, too good of a deal. I do have a friend with a beginner oriented board (can't remember the model), but it is not a wide. Will that present problem, toe drag - etc? I could borrow this board a couple times while initially learning.
post #4 of 22
Toe drag won't be a problem until you start going faster and getting higher edge angles. In 10 years of teaching I've only had one student progress to high edge angles on their first day.

Don't confuse a "beginner board" with a "learning board". They are almost the same, but not quite. Learning boards (e.g. Burton LTR, Rossi accelerator) are intended only for rentals, but not all rentals are learning boards. Beginner boards are intended to be bought by the public and used enough times to make ownership worthwhile. Learning boards are intended to get you started. Once you can link turns, you're ready to move up the food chain.
post #5 of 22
I don't have personal experience with the Custom or the Ruler, but I have owned a pair of Cartels for the last 2 years. I am real happy with them. They have held up through probably 100 days of abuse (teaching/freeriding) and are still charging.

Hope that helps some.

-nerd
post #6 of 22
Not sure why wide? In my experience, go with the narrowest board you can fit your feet on. As a former skier, you'll appreciate having easier edge-to-edge transitions, especially once you start going faster and carving turns. But take that with a grain of salt - I'm a freak when it comes to snowboards. I ride them like I ski. Carving turns and going fast. My current favorite boards are in the 19-22cm waist range and I ride in hard boots with steep angles.
post #7 of 22
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sinecure View Post
Not sure why wide? In my experience, go with the narrowest board you can fit your feet on. As a former skier, you'll appreciate having easier edge-to-edge transitions, especially once you start going faster and carving turns. But take that with a grain of salt - I'm a freak when it comes to snowboards. I ride them like I ski. Carving turns and going fast. My current favorite boards are in the 19-22cm waist range and I ride in hard boots with steep angles.
I think my friend was worried I would get some toe drag, I'd be getting sz 11 boots. What size boot do you wear Sinecure?
post #8 of 22
I wear size 10 boots and I've booted out on normal waisted boards. It can get frustrating. One can change to more aggressive stance angles and/or go duck to deal with the problem. It's a choice. I choose wide.
post #9 of 22
In response to Rusty's previous comment. I wear a size 13 boot and have moved to the wide. I would almost say you are better off getting the wide board as a beginner so you don't have to mess around with the aggressive angles and possible learning to ride duck. This will allow you to learn with the possibility of adopting multiple different kinds of stances and ultimately finding the one that is most comfortable for you.

Also, I used to work in a snowboard shop. Board and bindings are top notch.
post #10 of 22
Going with the wide board is a good idea.

Start out with a learning board and then move to your steezy new gear.
post #11 of 22
My grom has the 154 Custom, Cartels and the Shaun Whites in an 11.
He's pretty good and doesn't seem to have too much trouble with toe drag. He's very happy with all of his gear.

167 seems kind of long for a east coast beginner too me.
post #12 of 22
I'd recommend the Custom to beginning riders as well. I had trouble linking turns with other boards, including the Burton Cruzer which is known as abeginner board. The first time I tried with the Custom I was able to do it.
post #13 of 22

Well my grom,(15), is now growing like a weed.  5'10"@150 lbs., muscular. Right now he rides Aspen Mountain and Highlands exclusively, mostly freerides bumps, powder and crud.  I am thinking of getting him a new Custom X  in a 159W?  Does this sound about right?

post #14 of 22

Shred,

 

That sounds like a good size to grow into. You do know that this model has the channel binding setup?  There are no screw holes for regular bindings.

post #15 of 22

Yes, but I think the ICS comes with a plate, so that he can use his Cartels?

post #16 of 22

My ICS setup did not come with plates to mount regular bindings.

post #17 of 22

Just an FYI:  I ordered the Custom X ICS from Sierra Snowboard last week and it did come with a plate.

post #18 of 22

Did it come in flat white box? Have you used it to mount a traditional binding to the channel?

post #19 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by therusty View Post

 

Did it come in flat white box?

 

Yes.  I haven't mounted them yet.  His board w/Cartels is in Aspen and I had the X shipped to Chicago.  He won't be in Aspen till spring break.  I would like to use his current cartels, but could buy him new bindings if there was a performance advantage or if you think there might a mounting problem? 

 

I don't really know that much about the ICS system, so your opinion is appreciated.

post #20 of 22

Well ..... I'm just saying .....

 

When I got the board, the flat white box looked like an adapter plate, but I could not figure out how it would work with a regular binding. When I finally got the right bindings, they too had the same flat white box. It's got two disks in it that look like ICS disks not 3 hole or 4 hole disks.

post #21 of 22

OK,

 

I got the word. The flat white box has center "disc" plates with two holes for mounting that connect to the channel screws. So you take your regular bindings and instead of connecting them with 3 (Burton) or 4 (everyone else) screws, you just use two.

 

What got me confused was that when you use ICS bindings, the screws connect on the outside of the binding, not through the disc plate.

post #22 of 22

Yes, that's what it looked like. I ended up getting him the new ICS Cartels at Sierra for 50%. Now he can use his old board in the park back here.The new ICS system was super easy to adjust, even out on the hill. 

We had lots of new snow and the 159W Custom X worked really well.

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