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Help with boot alignment - Page 2

post #31 of 55
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by slider View Post
Thanks for the good read jdistefa. Moving the Hippies through the turn/down the hill is huge but barely noticed by the untrained eye. One question tdk6. What do the sole of your shoes look like?


turn the left side of your brain off
MA without left side of brain up and running?!?

So what do you think about my hippies? Are they moving through the turn down the hill properly or not?
post #32 of 55
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by RayCantu View Post
Tdk6,
Sorry missed the point that you were looking for canted plates.
This company has sole plates milled in .5 degree
increments from .5 to I think 3.5 degrees.
Sports Tech, Ltd.
Call us at
1-800-877-7776
or fax us at 802-728-7136
Thanks, just what I was looking for . However, site under construction. I dont want to call. Any clue of e-mail address?
post #33 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by tdk6 View Post
MA without left side of brain up and running?!? Don't think so much. Just relax.

So what do you think about my hippies? Are they moving through the turn down the hill properly or not?
In a word no. Hippies are in the backseat which makes you bend/fold at the waist causing imbalance or a bobble if you like on occasion. Upper body needs to stand taller in your stance and visualize/project your Hipppies down the hill following your feet in a sense. When you get it you'll know it.
post #34 of 55
What I noticed in all of the videos is that at the end of the turn your uphill foot is projected forward. Notice that this isn't happening in all of the Canadian videos.
Turns start at the snow with the feet. Think about what you're doing with your feet. Your turns look kind of sequential instead of a simultanious edge change. I go back and look at mt tracks for evidence of simutanious edge change. For me the key (mentally) is what I do with my downhill foot.
As for the canting, your "A frame" is much less in the after sequences. I'd say you're on the right track there. The sequential turn has something to do with the "A frame" though I think. Remember as Witherall says in the Athletic Skier " the last ?%(little bit) makes 80%?(most) of the difference. I'd reccomend experimenting with layers of ductape until you hit the sweet spot before you invest in plates or grinding that will permanently alter your boots. In my experience 6 layers equal about one degree. Put the ductape directly on the (dry) boot sole where the AFD and the heel piece touch.
Thanks for the Zermatt footage. I think I've skied that run.
post #35 of 55
Tdk6,
Here is email address

sportstltd@aol.com
post #36 of 55
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by slider View Post
In a word no. Hippies are in the backseat which makes you bend/fold at the waist causing imbalance or a bobble if you like on occasion. Upper body needs to stand taller in your stance and visualize/project your Hipppies down the hill following your feet in a sense. When you get it you'll know it.
Could this be a boot issue? Could it be that my boots have too much forward lean? Should I take the spoiler out or/and set my delta angle to cero?
post #37 of 55
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by SLATZ View Post
What I noticed in all of the videos is that at the end of the turn your uphill foot is projected forward. Notice that this isn't happening in all of the Canadian videos.
Turns start at the snow with the feet. Think about what you're doing with your feet. Your turns look kind of sequential instead of a simultanious edge change. I go back and look at mt tracks for evidence of simutanious edge change. For me the key (mentally) is what I do with my downhill foot.
As for the canting, your "A frame" is much less in the after sequences. I'd say you're on the right track there. The sequential turn has something to do with the "A frame" though I think. Remember as Witherall says in the Athletic Skier " the last ?%(little bit) makes 80%?(most) of the difference. I'd reccomend experimenting with layers of ductape until you hit the sweet spot before you invest in plates or grinding that will permanently alter your boots. In my experience 6 layers equal about one degree. Put the ductape directly on the (dry) boot sole where the AFD and the heel piece touch.
Thanks for the Zermatt footage. I think I've skied that run.
Thanks for your feedback. You comment on my inside foot getting pushed forwards at the end of each turn. Could you be more specific and point out where in the video that happens. Note that the canadians are on GS skis and ski exclusivley ILE and probably trying to keep their skis on an edge where Im on SL skis and trying to push the limits (dynamic carving video). Do not get me wrong, I could not ski like them even if I tried but there is a deffinite difference in intent.

If I start by applying 0,5deg of permanent plates I can allways try to increase the canting by applying tape in addition. If it feels better I take the duct tape off and compare. If it feels worse then I swap for new 1,0deg plates and proceed by applying even more tape underneath. If I have understood it correctly I can allways increase the canting but never decrease it since Im modifying the boot at the top as well. Is this correct?
post #38 of 55
TDK6
You need to listen now. THis will be my only post and then I two am going to bow out.

The issues can be alignment but remaining static is more about technique. Some of the best guys available have stated you should work on technique and in addition have answered your questions on alignment.

You cannot get any further with your line of questioning. You have answers from several sources to exactly what you are again asking.

Go ski. Find a coach. Work on technical issues, play slowly with boots if you like and educate yourself. Come back several months into the season with days behind you and show us the new video with new technique.

Finally I would say your intent is no different from Thomas's or any other of the Canadian skiers. It seems to me you want to make as clean and fast a carve as possible skiing in a modern technique.

Lou
post #39 of 55
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lou Rosenfeld View Post
TDK6
You need to listen now. THis will be my only post and then I two am going to bow out.

The issues can be alignment but remaining static is more about technique. Some of the best guys available have stated you should work on technique and in addition have answered your questions on alignment.

You cannot get any further with your line of questioning. You have answers from several sources to exactly what you are again asking.

Go ski. Find a coach. Work on technical issues, play slowly with boots if you like and educate yourself. Come back several months into the season with days behind you and show us the new video with new technique.

Finally I would say your intent is no different from Thomas's or any other of the Canadian skiers. It seems to me you want to make as clean and fast a carve as possible skiing in a modern technique.

Lou
Thanks for those warming last words. Anyhow, sorry to be asking the same questions in a repeting manner but you gotta give me credit for handing you guys videos before and after with complementing photosequences. How much more do you need in order to fill this thread with usefull boot alignment tips. My conclusion of this thread is that skiing is mainly about technique and not about boots. Boot alignment will only get you so far but if you want to become really good screw boot alignment and hire a coach. I still dont get it. I dont see virtually any thread here on this techique forum were alignment tips are handed out as a solution of some sort but in a thread conserning alignment as primary discussion focus threads even get moved out of the boot forum by request of boot masters themselves! Some more controversy: there was a thread in the technique forum just recently with a video of a WC skier making a practise run. Not far into the thread there was a serious suggestion the skier was poorly aligned and canted. Also, the reason Im discussing this matter now is that there is no snow at the moment and this is the best time to get all the gear ready for the comming winter. Dont worry, I will provide you with new video clips, something very few here are willing to do. And I will experiment. I allredy have. Im not ranting you, your postings in this thread have been top class. Thank you.
post #40 of 55
tdk6,

To keep this thread breathing, have you ever visited a c. ped? (Certified Pedorthist).

Might there be some structural issues in your feet/ankles that potentially can be resolved to assist you toward your goals?

I appreciate your persistance. You want a more accurate feel. Glad you acknowledge it's not there yet.
post #41 of 55
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by whygimf View Post
tdk6,

To keep this thread breathing, have you ever visited a c. ped? (Certified Pedorthist).

Might there be some structural issues in your feet/ankles that potentially can be resolved to assist you toward your goals?

I appreciate your persistance. You want a more accurate feel. Glad you acknowledge it's not there yet.
Excellent information here, thanks. We dont have any professional bootfitters that would be dooing alignment. They only modify the boot to fit. They also do footbeds but Im not so sure they know what they are dooing. I still use my old footbeds from 1989. But can you fit c.ped footbeds in downhill boots?
post #42 of 55
tdk6, take a flight to Geneva and head up to Chamonix to see a good fitter there, or get a flight to London and go see CEM - Ryanair fly from Tampere to Stansted, or go from Helsinki.
post #43 of 55
Footbeds from 1989

And you do 70 days per year?
post #44 of 55
Thread Starter 
Yeah, I do 70+ a year. Had the footbeds done in 89 in valdisere and they have served me well. Ive had new footbeds made over the years but non as good as therse. They are thin and well shaped.

I bet they make good ones in the alps but never really hit the right shop for that top of the line quality. On my next tripp I will scout arround. Still wonder if the c.ped footbeds are good for skiing?
post #45 of 55
The visit to the c-ped was to help you understand if you have the need for structural assistance via a footbed - if no, fine. If yes, then find a boot specialist and get it done.
post #46 of 55
Hey T.D.K. take a week in May and look for a ski camp in Austria that does alignment as part of the service.
post #47 of 55
Sorry I've been away a few days.
The foot forward is just before you transition your weight to the new foot. It's part of why there's an appearance of an "A" frame.
It doesn't matter what skis you're on. Think about moving both feet at the same time and tipping both skis at the same time. There appears to be a projection forward of the uphill foot followed by a transfer of weight then tipping of the downhill foot. Try activating the kinetic chain with the little toe of the downhill foot while your feet are "side by each" That way the shins stay parallel as the downhill foot leads the uphill one into the new turn. You need to have both feet underneath you for this to work. If the uphill foot gets ahead it's out from under you and it won't roll over, leaving you in the backseat.
As for the plates, don't you have to grind the top of the lug parallel when you use them? Once that's done it's hard to go back. That's why I suggested trying to get pretty close before you do anything permanent to the boot. If you put the tape on the boot sole (and use Cat Tracks) it's pretty durable. I had mine like that for a whole season before I got around to making it permanent. (shoemaker's kids thing you know )
post #48 of 55
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by whygimf View Post
The visit to the c-ped was to help you understand if you have the need for structural assistance via a footbed - if no, fine. If yes, then find a boot specialist and get it done.
I dont think I need any structural assistance. At a health expo a few years ago there was a carpet with sensors that you could walk and run over. The fittness coach that did the analysis told me after looking at my footsteps electronically on a computer screen that I was the second of hundreds that day with a near perfect foot print on both feet both walking and running. So I dont think I need a footbed for structural reasons.
post #49 of 55
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by geoffsep1963 View Post
Hey T.D.K. take a week in May and look for a ski camp in Austria that does alignment as part of the service.
That has been my intention a couple of years now but for me May is such a crappy month for skiing. Not possible.
post #50 of 55
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by SLATZ View Post
Sorry I've been away a few days.
The foot forward is just before you transition your weight to the new foot. It's part of why there's an appearance of an "A" frame.
It doesn't matter what skis you're on. Think about moving both feet at the same time and tipping both skis at the same time. There appears to be a projection forward of the uphill foot followed by a transfer of weight then tipping of the downhill foot. Try activating the kinetic chain with the little toe of the downhill foot while your feet are "side by each" That way the shins stay parallel as the downhill foot leads the uphill one into the new turn. You need to have both feet underneath you for this to work. If the uphill foot gets ahead it's out from under you and it won't roll over, leaving you in the backseat.
As for the plates, don't you have to grind the top of the lug parallel when you use them? Once that's done it's hard to go back. That's why I suggested trying to get pretty close before you do anything permanent to the boot. If you put the tape on the boot sole (and use Cat Tracks) it's pretty durable. I had mine like that for a whole season before I got around to making it permanent. (shoemaker's kids thing you know )
Thanks for the feedback. Yes, I cannot go back once I grind the boots after canting. But I can allways increase the canting angle. Thats why I was thinking I would start with one degree on both and then put some tape on and see how much more I need on each foot.

Dont you think the a-frame is a result of too much edging angle on outside foot due to being undercanted? To mee it all makes sence. Still, I agree with you that tipping should start with the new inside foot leading the way.
post #51 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by tdk6 View Post
I dont think I need any structural assistance.
Considering your desperation for advise, you shouldn't be so sure to base it on walking on a carpet - kinda like perceiving you have no strength weaknesses after the carnival from swinging the sledge and ringing the bell...

Best of luck. Some things can't be done over the internet.
post #52 of 55
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by whygimf View Post
Considering your desperation for advise, you shouldn't be so sure to base it on walking on a carpet - kinda like perceiving you have no strength weaknesses after the carnival from swinging the sledge and ringing the bell...

Best of luck. Some things can't be done over the internet.
Im not desperate for advice, simply want to ask peoples opinions here on the internet. Sounds like you have not much trust in internet discussions but I think there is loads of great advice handed out by highly knowlidgeble people.

From your foot print you can read a lot of interesting information. You dont need a magic carpet, you can also do it by stepping in water and walking over a dry pavement and look at your footprints.
post #53 of 55
Too much edge angle on the "outside" foot (uphill foot) before tipping the downhill foot is the reason for the "A" frame appearance. The main difference in the two videos (one canted and one not) is the width of the stance, undercanting usually leaves one with a wider stance. The movements are pretty much the same. What I'm talking about is a movement pattern (or sequence). It appears that you're starting your turn by pressuring and edging your uphill ski. I'm suggesting to relax (lighten) then tip your downhill foot to initiate the turn. More canting makes this easier because it narrows your stance and makes it easier to get your CM across.
post #54 of 55
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by SLATZ View Post
Too much edge angle on the "outside" foot (uphill foot) before tipping the downhill foot is the reason for the "A" frame appearance. The main difference in the two videos (one canted and one not) is the width of the stance, undercanting usually leaves one with a wider stance. The movements are pretty much the same. What I'm talking about is a movement pattern (or sequence). It appears that you're starting your turn by pressuring and edging your uphill ski. I'm suggesting to relax (lighten) then tip your downhill foot to initiate the turn. More canting makes this easier because it narrows your stance and makes it easier to get your CM across.
Thanks for your feedback. I see what you mean. I have been too quick to shift weight onto the new outside ski to get it on an edge. Not only that but I have been forced to tip it more than what I need to do now after Ive been canted. Some have commented that I seem to be overcanted. Do you see such indications?
post #55 of 55
Usually symptoms of overcanting are moving the hip out over the outside ski. I don't notice that. In general your turns look pretty good. It's the transition that needs some work.
Canting effects the stance width and when it goes too far, the hips.
Let the little toe of the downhill ski get the "snowball" rolling down the hill. Keep the feet more "side by each". The appearance is a more simultanious edge change like the Canadians are doing.
Of course there has to be some active work to keep the feet side by side, dare I say, pulling the inside(uphill foot) back.
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