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Confused About Finding a 1-Ski-Quiver for Utah

post #1 of 26
Thread Starter 
I'm a level 7 skier, 26yrs old, and I typically ski once a year with a trip out west for 5 days. This year I'm going to Alta/Snowbird at the end of January. As I read more about skiing, I see that my skis are very narrow for powder skiing (Volkl Supersport S5's 68mm).

So I'm looking at what I can do so that I'm not suffering out in Utah when we get dumped on. My confusion comes from the fact that I like to ski moguls, back bowls, and frontside groomers--basically the whole mountain. Moguls and powder seem to be opposites when it comes to picking a ski best suited for each. So my question is: What do you guys do in this situation? I mean, I assume there's going to be tons of powder every day I'm there, so do I have to choose between floating really well on powder and not being able to ski moguls, or skiing moguls but sinking in powder? And if I just buy another pair of skis, do you literally have to bring both pair to the mountain so that you can switch them out when you want to ski moguls vs. powder?

Thanks for the help.
post #2 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by ryanjm View Post
I'm a level 7 skier,

do you literally have to bring both pair to the mountain so that you can switch them out when you want to ski moguls vs. powder?

Thanks for the help.
It depends what you get, and how it works for you. A good skier can rip bumps on "all-mountain" fatties. You seem to be asking for a Scott P4, K2 Seth, Volkl gotama type ski. But what you should really do is rent, not buy. Moguls are not the attraction in UT. And even if they are to you, you won't find any moguls on a powder day.
post #3 of 26
Thread Starter 
Yeah, I don't know why I hadn't really considered just renting...I guess I've always bought skis since I used to ski more often in NY, but CO and UT have spoiled me. I think I'll just see about selling the S5's and use the money to rent whatever I want. Thanks.
post #4 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by ryanjm View Post
I assume there's going to be tons of powder every day I'm there, so do I have to choose between floating really well on powder and not being able to ski moguls, or skiing moguls but sinking in powder?
Its a mistake to think that there will be powder everyday. This is not the case. If you get lucky and hit it right it is incredible. For the most part you can count on soft snow (not much ice, but it does happen). If you want a wider ski go ahead and pick one up. However I would suggest for this year you demo when you come out. Try several different skis and find out what you like. Then pick up what you want later in the year at a lower price.

I keep 3-4 pair of skis in my locker at the mountain. So I have access to whatever I want. That being said I rarely switch between skis during a day of skiing. But I may be different then others because I ski a smaller Utah resort that keeps its pow stashes for several days after a storm. My everyday ski is the 99mm waist 183 Bro.
post #5 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by ryanjm View Post
Moguls and powder seem to be opposites when it comes to picking a ski best suited for each.
You are confusing yourself by saying you want a 1 ski quiver in one breath (a ski decent in all wherever conditions), and then wanting "a ski best suited for each" meaning moguls and powder.

Logically impossible. If you do want a 1 s q then it will be "best suited" for neither.

Stepping away from anything labeled 'moguls' or 'powder', your job is to find something reasonably floaty in a flex that won't beat you up in bumps.

Try looking among skis from high 80mm waist to mid 90mm waist for a start.
None of those are really fat enough to be called 'powder' skis these days.
A lot of them will be friendlier or comparable in bumps to your Volkls, and depending on flex and your size will float you decently enough for a week's joy and more.
post #6 of 26
moguls in utah are not the same as moguls back east. the gotama or similar will handle utah bumps just fine.
post #7 of 26
K2s in general are very forgiving skis. My Crossfires were my one ski quiver for a long time and work well in most conditions. I have an older pair before they changed the shape so mine are 68 under foot. Tips are wide enough and the ski flexes enough that they work fine in powder. The new Crossfires, even better.

They get a little squirlly when they hit 50mph or so but as a level 7 this shouldn't be a problem for you. They do lack energy and it is a little tough to develop rebound on them. I'd demo a pair.
post #8 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by epl View Post
moguls in utah are not the same as moguls back east. the gotama or similar will handle utah bumps just fine.
EXACTLY! i was killin it in the UT bumps last spring on some 191 mantras (96mm waist) and i was only starting to get good at moguls at that point.

the biggest advantage that you could give yourself would be to do some hill running, cycling, or squats so that your LEGS can keep up, because when i went back to ski utah during snowbird's closing weekend (late june), my legs were mush from two months of being in class and not exercising, so my mogul skiing was a lot worse than before!
post #9 of 26
I've heard very good things from friends about the Line Prophet 100's, especially how well they do on the groomed stuff after you take the morning powder runs. I was also told they have really good rebound even with the metal matrix in the core of the ski. Definitely check em out.
post #10 of 26
Thread Starter 
Ok, thanks for the info guys. I've heard good things about the Head Monster 88's (paid for the realskiers reviews last year). I've heard there really aren't many "bad" skis anymore, so I'm less concerned with demo'ing in order to find a pair I like. I'd rather either buy a pair that's last year's model on sale, or just consider renting anytime I ski...however I might be skiing more often in the near future if I start making more money, so buying a pair still appeals to me.
post #11 of 26
buy some k2 pe's and be done with it. they are 85mm in the waist and have a much more upturned/long-rising tip than most skis, so they handle powder fairly well. they are also stiff enough for crud, but not too stiff for moguls. they are also twin-tips so the tails release well in the bumps. and because they have no metal (unlike the head 88's), they will be very hard to bend (not flex... as in BREAK) in the bumps. and to top it off, they are dirt-ass cheap and in huge supply. go get 'em. they're MY all-mountain/bump skis.
post #12 of 26
There are other versatile skis, but the K2 PEs are impressive in almost all terrain. To me, in almost every condition, they score a B+. Not great, but pretty good. They carve, they float, they turn easy, they go through crud,... you name it. And they are cheap too.
post #13 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dgudaitis View Post
There are other versatile skis, but the K2 PEs are impressive in almost all terrain. To me, in almost every condition, they score a B+. Not great, but pretty good. They carve, they float, they turn easy, they go through crud,... you name it. And they are cheap too.
agreed... to-the-T
post #14 of 26
Suggestion #1: as the time approaches, call the crew at the shop under the Peruvian (or check out other well regarded LCC shops discussed recently in Marshal's thread at TGR). See what they suggest for what is happening or about to happen & have them set the right stuff aside for you. Swap around & explore as needed.

Suggestion #2: With modern designs, & where you are going, you can comfortably go way fatter than lots of folks think & still get great all around performance. And not be left out of the big fun. My contender list (partially based on experience, partially on reliable hearsay) would include Hell Bent, EP Pro, Katana, JJ, Sir Francis Bacon, etc. Goats or Prophet 100 or similar if I wanted to be conservative. The notion of anything under 100 or 105 is very unappealing to me. Maybe think about a Czar or Lhasa Pow...
post #15 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by spindrift View Post
Suggestion #1: as the time approaches, call the crew at the shop under the Peruvian (or check out other well regarded LCC shops discussed recently in Marshal's thread at TGR). See what they suggest for what is happening or about to happen & have them set the right stuff aside for you. Swap around & explore as needed.

Suggestion #2: With modern designs, & where you are going, you can comfortably go way fatter than lots of folks think & still get great all around performance. And not be left out of the big fun. My contender list (partially based on experience, partially on reliable hearsay) would include Hell Bent, EP Pro, Katana, JJ, Sir Francis Bacon, etc. Goats or Prophet 100 or similar if I wanted to be conservative. The notion of anything under 100 or 105 is very unappealing to me. Maybe think about a Czar or Lhasa Pow...
Good advice here.
post #16 of 26
this year (including several trips to utah) i was able to try out many skis of varying widths: 85, 87, 95, 96, 97, 99, 100, 109, 112, 115, and 120mm. and of all those skis, i probably could've chosen any ONE of them to ride EVERY day of last season on (with the exception of two or three EXTREME days) and i would've been just fine.

in general, i agree with spindrift that fat skis can be far more versatile than people think (i will be riding dynastar xxl's @109mm as my every day ski when i go to utah, mammoth, or tahoe in the future). fat skis can do almost anything you ask of them, but unless the snow has SOME depth to it, they will not be HELPING you. in my opinion, this is fine if you are prepared to be challenged and to become a better skier. but remember, when you enter a mogul field on a pair of 120mm waisted skis, IT'S ALL ON YOU! the skis are just along for the ride.
post #17 of 26
Lukc and Spindrift have it about right; a whole slew of skis could work.

OTOH, being ABLE to ski everything well on most skis is not the same as saying these skis are optimized for everything. Taking a Dynastar XXL into bumps is quite feasible - if you're good, and these guys are - but not what the ski is designed for. Or at the other extreme, I've skied the back bowls of both Snowbird and Vail on a pair of 6*. Worked, but let's just say I didn't feel the need for a gym in the evenings.

So, when you show up at a good shop, it would help them - and keep you from sounding like a pilgrim - to have thought about priorities. Will you spend more time backside or frontside? Are you more into big speed in the open or lotsa turns and tight spaces? Do you like a light quick ski or a heavy smooth one?

Or if you want to just pull the trigger and then not worry about demoing, some versatile/reliable candidates I personally see for athletic Level 7, in roughly increasing stiffness according to your taste, most findable online in last year's model for 40-60% below this year's models:

Sollie Guns, K2 PE's, Goats, Scott P4's, Head Mojo 90's, Prophet 100's, Blizzard Cronos, Fischer Watea 94's or Atuas, Volkl Bridge's.
post #18 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by beyond View Post
Lukc and Spindrift have it about right; a whole slew of skis could work.

OTOH, being ABLE to ski everything well on most skis is not the same as saying these skis are optimized for everything. Taking a Dynastar XXL into bumps is quite feasible - if you're good, and these guys are - but not what the ski is designed for. Or at the other extreme, I've skied the back bowls of both Snowbird and Vail on a pair of 6*. Worked, but let's just say I didn't feel the need for a gym in the evenings.

So, when you show up at a good shop, it would help them - and keep you from sounding like a pilgrim - to have thought about priorities. Will you spend more time backside or frontside? Are you more into big speed in the open or lotsa turns and tight spaces? Do you like a light quick ski or a heavy smooth one?

Or if you want to just pull the trigger and then not worry about demoing, some versatile/reliable candidates I personally see for athletic Level 7, in roughly increasing stiffness according to your taste, most findable online in last year's model for 40-60% below this year's models:

Sollie Guns, K2 PE's, Goats, Scott P4's, Head Mojo 90's, Prophet 100's, Blizzard Cronos, Fischer Watea 94's or Atuas, Volkl Bridge's.
absolutely right on. done.

edit: not 100% on the relative stiffness ranking, though, as i've yet to flex about half of those skis
post #19 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by UTpowder View Post

I keep 3-4 pair of skis in my locker at the mountain. So I have access to whatever I want. That being said I rarely switch between skis during a day of skiing. But I may be different then others because I ski a smaller Utah resort that keeps its pow stashes for several days after a storm. My everyday ski is the 99mm waist 183 Bro.

Hells yeah. I'd say something around 100 waist would be your happy medium. The 183 Bro would be a great choice. Also Goats, Prophet 100s (last year's are cheap and awesome!) and many others in that range. Key: wide enough to give you some float, stiff enough to slay the chowder once the gapers ski away all the freshies (which you choose will relate to your personal style and preference of stiff/soft)... Good luck man, you have the greatest burden a skier can deal with!
post #20 of 26
Unless you're really short on cash I'd keep those Volkls for the days when you want to ski bumps or it hasn't snowed in a week. They're great skis. Rent on the day you know you will really enjoy having a wider ski.
Also remember that most of the guys pushing the 100 mm wide powder skis can probably take their bros and outski most of us on bumps then take your Supersports and outski us in the powder so it's all relaitive.
post #21 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by UTpowder View Post

I keep 3-4 pair of skis in my locker at the mountain. So I have access to whatever I want. That being said I rarely switch between skis during a day of skiing. But I may be different then others because I ski a smaller Utah resort that keeps its pow stashes for several days after a storm. My everyday ski is the 99mm waist 183 Bro.
In the locker? Nobody uses lockers any more. Why not hire a ski caddy for the day so you can switch out at the top of each run? It goes something like this....

Top of Tram....

Me "hmmmm, looks like some wind buff pow.
What do you recommend for Silver Fox today?"

Caddy "Well sir, the wind is coming in from the west at 8mph with gusts to 18 so I'd recommend going with the P4 at 104mm in the waist. "

Me "Yes, I think you're right. Very well, hand me the P4's then and I'll see you at the bottom. Be sure to spot my landing this time off the rock outcropping."

Caddy "Absolutely. Keep your eye out for that nasty sharks tooth on the entrance..."

---

All joking aside, if you're looking for something on the cheap in the 100mm range, Bluehouse is having their pre-season sale next week and the District which is 103mm will be $334. Or better yet, find someone who bought them last year and have them buy this years for you at $296, that is if they aren't already getting a pair.
post #22 of 26
Thread Starter 
^LOL. Good stuff. I used to caddy too.
post #23 of 26
[quote=powstash;950323]In the locker? Nobody uses lockers any more. Why not hire a ski caddy for the day so you can switch out at the top of each run? It goes something like this....

Top of Tram....

Me "hmmmm, looks like some wind buff pow.
What do you recommend for Silver Fox today?"

Caddy "Well sir, the wind is coming in from the west at 8mph with gusts to 18 so I'd recommend going with the P4 at 104mm in the waist. "

Me "Yes, I think you're right. Very well, hand me the P4's then and I'll see you at the bottom. Be sure to spot my landing this time off the rock outcropping."

Caddy "Absolutely. Keep your eye out for that nasty sharks tooth on the entrance..."

---


I need one of those. Do you know where I could get a demo? I'd hate to get stuck with a bad one. I keep telling my wife thats her job. So far its not working out. She has switched me out with a different pair a couple times and meets me at the lodge with a beverage. She usually only skis half day so she also moves the car up to the front.
post #24 of 26
Also agree on the Bluehouse deal. It's a good way to get into something fatter for not a lot of $$$.
post #25 of 26
Grab the Volkl Goat or Mantra and you will be golden in UT.

I also have found myself ripping b bumps on the 184 Mantra, no problem. Takes a little getting used to, but a few runs and you will be money.
post #26 of 26
Well, let's see, the (sorta) official ski of Snowbird would be, ummm, Dynastar.

Maybe a Mythic Rider or Legend Pro would be appropriate?
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