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K2 True Love or alternative

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 
I am looking to buy skis for my (soon to be) wife. She started skiing last year and is an advanced beginner, low intermediate making skidded parallel turns. From talking to folks and reading reviews I have been looking for the K2 True Love as a "safe" ski to get her that will last her for a couple of years (when we finally move to the Rockies as opposed to traveling there for skiing). So, 2 questions:

Where's the best deal on last year's K2 Love? My wife is 5'4" and about 110 lb. I was considering a ski somewhere in the 150 cm range.

What are other alternatives to consider?
post #2 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Si View Post
What are other alternatives to consider?
Boots.

If she doesn't have her own boots, buy boots first. They aren't as flashy as skis, but a correctly fitted pair of boots will help her immensely.

Do it right. Find a good boot fitter. Pay the price. Get custom footbeds. If it's done right, she'll be warm, comfortable and confident. The boots will respond. She'll have them for years and she won't give them up.
post #3 of 15
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by jhcooley View Post
Boots.

If she doesn't have her own boots, buy boots first. They aren't as flashy as skis, but a correctly fitted pair of boots will help her immensely.

Do it right. Find a good boot fitter. Pay the price. Get custom footbeds. If it's done right, she'll be warm, comfortable and confident. The boots will respond. She'll have them for years and she won't give them up.
Boots were acquired after the first trip when she decided skiing was something she wanted to continue with. Still working on alignment issues but fit, footbeds, and comfort are good. I have found on slope testing of alignment to be somewhat variable at this early stage but I'm hoping that with her own skis we'll be able to narrow that down this year. If you look at some of my posting history over the years you'll see I have a strong orientation to boot set-up and alignment.
post #4 of 15
K2 True Luv's are definitely a "safe" easy going intermediate ski and most likely she would be more then happy on them. A good secondary choice that I have seen a lot of intermediate women skiers be very happy with is the Dynastar Exclusive Active. It is a bit lighter weight then the True Luv and IMO they have better edge grip and better technolgy to help your wife ski better. Ultimitely the Active is a more Women Specific ski which will definately make your wife and you very happy skier.

Dynastar Exclusive Active Womens Skis

Sierra Canuck
post #5 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Si View Post
I am looking to buy skis for my (soon to be) wife. She started skiing last year and is an advanced beginner, low intermediate making skidded parallel turns. From talking to folks and reading reviews I have been looking for the K2 True Love as a "safe" ski to get her that will last her for a couple of years (when we finally move to the Rockies as opposed to traveling there for skiing). So, 2 questions:

Where's the best deal on last year's K2 Love? My wife is 5'4" and about 110 lb. I was considering a ski somewhere in the 150 cm range.

What are other alternatives to consider?

Si,

My wife is the exact kind of skier as your wife and almost the exact same size. She loves the True Love and skis it in a 146. I doubt my wife will get much better than she is, but if she does the ski can get her to the next level.

Try here for a pretty good deal with or without bindings.

http://www.aspenskiandboard.com/index.jsp
post #6 of 15
Hi Si.
IMO she would really benefit from some demo time, but in the interest of getting some great deals on WS skis, I'd suggest the Lotta luv. It will allow her to carve, is forgiving enough to help her get to the next level and yet is 78 in the waist so it will be sufficient for the chance she may experience some powder when you're out west.

I could fill your head with lots of awesome suggestions but I'll leave it at that for now.

As for Boots:
Jim is an amazing boot fitter at Crystal Mountain, here in Michigan.
I know you don't like to ski in Michigan, but it may be beneficial to a fitting if she can take a few short runs then hit Jim up for his expertise.
Besides that, you can help pic up my garage sale again
post #7 of 15
Thread Starter 
Sierra_canuck, thanks for the suggestion I will look into the Dynastar Exclusive Active as well.

Jgiddyup, thanks for the confirmation on the True Luv and the link.

TC, thanks for the input. I'm not sure I agree about demoing at this stage, however. It is my feeling that for the advanced beginner/low interdediate, the ski that feels the best may just respond better to developing technique but not necessarily give positive feedback differentially for better technique. Also, I don't think that my wife is really capable yet of differentiating between ski characteristics (in the realm of rental skis) except for length. Even there, as we have moved slightly longer, she has initially felt unable to control a longer ski, only to forget about it after a run or two. About the Lotta Luv, I'm a little concerned about the metal in that ski making it a bit hard to initially handle for an advanced beginner making skidded parallel turns and trying to develop better edge engagement?
post #8 of 15
Si, I think your concerns are well founded. The Lotta luv & the Tough luv are well luv'ed in the Sierras, by advanced skiers. The lotta is a very well luv'd crud buster because it is stiffer, heavier, & w/the metal laminate it is stable at speeds down those chopped up steeper runs. But much less forgiving for a newer skier. I've had my Tru luv's for 2 years, each time I think I've out grown them, I find some new response from them. But, I will never get speed from them. Which can be a good thing for a developing skier. I've added a few new skis, but not in a hurry to dump the tru luv's either. If you were going to step up in the K2 line, maybe the One Luv - still not metal laminate. Still forgiving. The Dynastars are def. worth looking at too. I keep eyeing those Exclusive Powders that Jim still has in stock. Wish I'd demo'd them last Winter.
post #9 of 15
Si, you're probably on target better than I am. The things that concern me about the softer ski is the inability to bust through crud, but then I'm skiing in conditions that are considerably different that you will be with your lovely bride.

911Over has given much better first hand knowledge and is likely giving you much better advice that I could under the circumstances.

About Demoing...........don't sell her short. I'm betting, if you put her on two or three different skis, she'll be able to tell you which one she likes.
post #10 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Si View Post
TC, thanks for the input. I'm not sure I agree about demoing at this stage, however. It is my feeling that for the advanced beginner/low interdediate, the ski that feels the best may just respond better to developing technique but not necessarily give positive feedback differentially for better technique. Also, I don't think that my wife is really capable yet of differentiating between ski characteristics (in the realm of rental skis) except for length.
I didn't read that, I didn't read that.

TC is absolutely on the mark for not selling your lady short on ability to have "some" feel & preference for a ski. After all, women tend to be a bit on the touchy feely side & we know what we like. It's not like it's her first time on skis.

It would be a great idea for her to demo both the Dynastar & K2, or another. They will feel different, both ski well, depends on which one feels best, and the balance will be different, Dynastars are more women specific in binding & mount point. That may be great or may not work for her. Same w/K2. Only trying it will tell. And the Dynastar edge grip is nice to have as she gets better.
post #11 of 15
Echoing TC and 911 here.

Don't sell her short (on ability to feel differences in skis, or in length!). Everyone who's ever said "I'll never know the difference" to me has been shock to find they have indeed known the difference when put on other skis. She may not be able to tell the difference in the rentals because they're all usually floppy, badly tuned, beginner crap skis (IMHO).

Give her a chance to find her own "one True Luv"
post #12 of 15
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the further input Volklgirl and 911over. I think volklgirl is at least partially correct about the reasons why she can't tell the difference between rental skis. They all have been relatively soft skis but not probably not quite as bad as her characterization. The one pair she got one day that wouldn't hold an edge whatsoever we quickly exchanged for something else.

I will continue to be skeptical, however, of the value of demoing for advanced beginner skiers in terms of ski characteristics (outside of balance/mounting point). An advanced beginner MAY very well find a soft ski that doesn't get on or hold an edge (relatively speaking) more "comfortable" then a better holding ski which might lead to quicker improvement and ultimately better and more satisfactory performance. (The trick, of course, is to get one that leads to such improvement but also works for the skier immediately - hence my original attraction to the True Luv).

In terms of balance and mounting points that is a separate issue. I am quite convinced that mounting point and balance play a significant role in performance and have worked with that on my own skis. My strong preference for my wife would be to have a binding like the railflex that allows me to play with mounting position. Next would be binding plates with pre-drilled holes so that I can try something different if fore/aft balance seems to be off. Finally, if there are no adjustments I would mount ball of foot to center of running surface which can produce significant difference from the manufacturer's mounting point and different ski characteristics. So, even demoing a ski for balance considerations doesn't necessarily give her the best idea of what the properly set-up ski will ski like.

I remain quite interested in hearing other views whether they conflict or concur with what I'm saying so please let me know if you disagree with my thinking.
post #13 of 15
Thread Starter 
One other question: For the True Luv, 146 or 153 length?
post #14 of 15
I have both my daughters on True Luvs. One is considerably larger than Barb and one is slightly smaller. The taller, heavier one is on the 160, I think, and only skis occasionally. The day I gave them to her, we skied all over Boyne, including several runs on SuperBowl, and she had a blast. She'd been on some straight ski for 10 years. The lighter one is on the 153. She's a ski patroller in Ohio and said she's found them a wonderful improvement in both ease of use and performance from the earlier shaped Dynastars I'd given her maybe six or seven years ago. I don't recall that model.

I'm with the ladies in agreeing that Barb should be able to discern differences in how the skis ski, despite her relative inexperience. She certainly will notice the difference from your average rental fleet equipment. I'd have to say, though, that the Lotta Luv might be a bit much. They're a bit wider and a fair amount stiffer with the metal laminations. My wife loves the Crossfire, which has the same metal layers and a stiffening vertical sidewall, but calls the Recon too much work. The difference is 8 mm underfoot.

I got both the True Luvs off ebay as brand new sets for less than my regional rep would sell them to me as used demo skis.

The 08-09 True Luvs come in lengths a couple cms longer, so those would be a 149 or a 156.
post #15 of 15
I have a pair of Lottas, I wouldn't call them particularly forgiving, they are also very heavy. While that doesn't make a difference on the feet, they could be a PIA for her to carry around. True Luvs however would be a really good choice.

I'm 5'5 and not light, I have Lotta's and Burnin's in 160, I would think a 149 would be about right.
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