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Atomic Crimson Titanium?

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 
After pouring over the new Ski and Skiing Magazine Gear Guides, I have come the the conclusion that (on paper) the Crimson Titanium is a ski I may be very interested in. Can anyone tell me more about these skis or better yet has anyone skied these?

Thanks in advance
post #2 of 19
It's probably too early for member reviews.

I seriously considered this ski and the Volkl AC50 (which I just bought). After a lot of research, they were the only two contenders.

I'm sure the Crimson Ti is a phenomonal ski. I own the Atomic M:EX, an earlier version of their ski for this segment, and they're wonderful.

A friend purchased the Atomic Nomad last year, and he's stoked.

SKI Magazine appears to love this ski, and SKIING also says great things.

It also looks cooler than the AC50.

Ultimately, I went with the AC50's because I wanted something different. But, it was a close, difficult choice.

In a perfect world, I'd have both.
post #3 of 19
My wife has hated every ski she ever used over 78mm, but she liked the Crimson so much I had to get her a second pair for AT bindings.

I'm looking at that Ti too, just need to find a reasonable price.
post #4 of 19
I have a pair of 185cm MEX and also had an early test pair of 183cm Crimsons for last season. All I can say is wow, buy 'em . They have a lot more balls and directional stability when compared to the Nomads (which I found too light), but are still easy to bend without being noodles torsionally. Ski them before buying to confirm, but IMO these are a no-risk proposition.
post #5 of 19
Thought you might find this interesting or helpful.

Top of the Atomic’s Nomad range. The Nomad’s are thoroughly versatile skis and the Crimson Ti doesn’t disappoint with its 86 mm waist and all-purpose medium-radius side-cut.
The latest model felt much more powerful than the original Crimson and I was surprised how aggressive one can ski on the Crimson Ti. This in not an intermediates ski, this is for an advanced skier looking for a very cost effective but smooth pair of skis that will give good grip on firm pistes and allow the skier to venture off into the backcountry if conditions allow.
The use-ability of this ski is where Atomic have done their home-work. A professional skier is on the hill pretty much everyday, they have not only the technique but the CV and the muscle-power to work a tough pair of expert freeride skis. Many regular holiday skiers on the other hand manage to get to the gym maybe once or twice a week and have a fair technique but they want a ski that will work with them and for them - this is where the Crimson Ti comes in. If you are an advanced skier looking for durability, good build quality, an interesting price point and a great pair of all-mountain “freeride skis” then the Crimson Ti’s could be for you.
An excellent package.
Skireviews.co.uk rating - 98/100
The manufacturer says this about the Atomic Nomad Crimson Ti Skis 2009:
The state-of-the-art all-mountaineer. With its chubby outline this ski gives you plenty of lift in powder while being super-light for an awesome level of balanced flex. The 6TFC sectors in the front end and 4 TFC sectors in the rear end combined with the Nano reinforcements make the ski run reassuringly smooth and stable. The reliability of all these functions together makes this the number 1 ski for maximum enjoyment all over the mountain. Easy to turn, agile and manoeuvrable giving you the “running on rails feel” both on the slope and in powder. Simply a lo of fun wherever you are.
post #6 of 19
Sierrasnowboard has the following review, it looks like a top end ski;

http://www.sierrasnowboard.com/2009-...-412-43680.asp

Last years standard Crimson was one of the best skis of the year, IMHO. Sierra Jim, have you skied the new ti yet?

Michael
post #7 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by JMD View Post
Thought you might find this interesting or helpful.

Top of the Atomic’s Nomad range. The Nomad’s are thoroughly versatile skis and the Crimson Ti doesn’t disappoint with its 86 mm waist and all-purpose medium-radius side-cut.
The latest model felt much more powerful than the original Crimson and I was surprised how aggressive one can ski on the Crimson Ti. This in not an intermediates ski, this is for an advanced skier looking for a very cost effective but smooth pair of skis that will give good grip on firm pistes and allow the skier to venture off into the backcountry if conditions allow.
The use-ability of this ski is where Atomic have done their home-work. A professional skier is on the hill pretty much everyday, they have not only the technique but the CV and the muscle-power to work a tough pair of expert freeride skis. Many regular holiday skiers on the other hand manage to get to the gym maybe once or twice a week and have a fair technique but they want a ski that will work with them and for them - this is where the Crimson Ti comes in. If you are an advanced skier looking for durability, good build quality, an interesting price point and a great pair of all-mountain “freeride skis” then the Crimson Ti’s could be for you.
An excellent package.
Skireviews.co.uk rating - 98/100
The manufacturer says this about the Atomic Nomad Crimson Ti Skis 2009:
The state-of-the-art all-mountaineer. With its chubby outline this ski gives you plenty of lift in powder while being super-light for an awesome level of balanced flex. The 6TFC sectors in the front end and 4 TFC sectors in the rear end combined with the Nano reinforcements make the ski run reassuringly smooth and stable. The reliability of all these functions together makes this the number 1 ski for maximum enjoyment all over the mountain. Easy to turn, agile and manoeuvrable giving you the “running on rails feel” both on the slope and in powder. Simply a lo of fun wherever you are.
JMD: Could you paste the skireviews.co.uk review of the Volkl AC50?

I tried several times to download the link, but I couldn't get it to load.

Thanks!
post #8 of 19
Thread Starter 
It sounds like the perfect ski. I currently ski a 66 mm waist ski with titanium. The Crimson TI seems as if it would maintain similar precision to the narrow waisted ski, but be more versitile. Thanks for the replies.
post #9 of 19
Captain Strato . I also have a challenge locating this web site. Last year it went by skireviews.co.uk. This year I found it under citizenski.wordpress.com They are a UK site using European Ski Resort Sites to do thier testing. This may mean they resemble East Coast conditions with less power then a West Coast Review.
Volkl Unlimited AC 50 Skis 2008/9


128-85-112. Dimensions that may warm the hearts and get the feet of many a back-country all-mountain skier twitching. The all-new Unlimited 50 features slightly narrower dimensions than Volkl’s range topping all-mountain ski The Grizzly but for many a seasoned skier looking for a slightly more economical and less technology loaded ski the Unlimited 50 will fit the bill.
Featuring some staple Volkl technology such as Double Grip construction and an XTD (Extended) Wood Core the Unlimited proves a smooth and capable performer both on European rough prepared groomers, icy crud and is pretty silky through the powder.
Slightly turned up at the tail for an ease of finish to your turns the AC 50 is much easier than the old Volkl "girders" of all old such as the legendary G3’s and G 4′S - but thank goodness they have changed for lighter and more tailored constructions and flexes to make an all-conditions ski that will suit many advanced to expert skiers looking to explore every corner of the mountain even if it isn’t at full-on freerider speeds.
post #10 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by JMD View Post
Captain Strato . I also have a challenge locating this web site. Last year it went by skireviews.co.uk. This year I found it under citizenski.wordpress.com They are a UK site using European Ski Resort Sites to do thier testing. This may mean they resemble East Coast conditions with less power then a West Coast Review.
Volkl Unlimited AC 50 Skis 2008/9


128-85-112. Dimensions that may warm the hearts and get the feet of many a back-country all-mountain skier twitching. The all-new Unlimited 50 features slightly narrower dimensions than Volkl’s range topping all-mountain ski The Grizzly but for many a seasoned skier looking for a slightly more economical and less technology loaded ski the Unlimited 50 will fit the bill.
Featuring some staple Volkl technology such as Double Grip construction and an XTD (Extended) Wood Core the Unlimited proves a smooth and capable performer both on European rough prepared groomers, icy crud and is pretty silky through the powder.
Slightly turned up at the tail for an ease of finish to your turns the AC 50 is much easier than the old Volkl "girders" of all old such as the legendary G3’s and G 4′S - but thank goodness they have changed for lighter and more tailored constructions and flexes to make an all-conditions ski that will suit many advanced to expert skiers looking to explore every corner of the mountain even if it isn’t at full-on freerider speeds.
JMD: Perfect.

Thanks!

It was a tough choice between the Atomic Crimson TI and the AC50.
post #11 of 19
Either ski here is nice. The Volkl just "felt" like it was more ski. For a bigger guy, I would lean to the AC50, for someone lighter that wants a springier ski, the Crimson.
post #12 of 19

I bought this ski and have taken it out a few times. I would highly recommend it. Don't let the reviews of how expert yada ya this ski is intimidate you; the only regret I have is that I should have gotten it a size or two bigger, and I stick to tree skiing 90% of the time. It is great for: some real powder, old powder, crud, and decent carving on piste.

post #13 of 19

I'm an advanced to expert, relatively light at 130lb & 5' 8", considering the Atomic Crimson Ti as my first fatter ski with a one-ski quiver limitation. Most of my skiing is off-piste but I like to bomb the groomers too. I'm not a gearhead and have not purchased/researched new gear for several years and coming out of a pair of 177cm Volkl Exp 724s to get a ski that will be more versatile although these have been great for me. I have always liked my skis longer/bigger than typical for my size to get the speed & stability. I note the reviews that push you to a shorter length in this ski and thinking of 162cm, but made a mistake 10-15 years ago of buying too short. Reinhard's comment makes me think I should consider 169cm in the Crimson. Was not able to demo this ski this year but want to hop on the end-of-season prices. Any thoughts/recommendations?

post #14 of 19

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chadman View Post

I'm an advanced to expert, relatively light at 130lb & 5' 8", considering the Atomic Crimson Ti as my first fatter ski with a one-ski quiver limitation. Most of my skiing is off-piste but I like to bomb the groomers too. I'm not a gearhead and have not purchased/researched new gear for several years and coming out of a pair of 177cm Volkl Exp 724s to get a ski that will be more versatile although these have been great for me. I have always liked my skis longer/bigger than typical for my size to get the speed & stability. I note the reviews that push you to a shorter length in this ski and thinking of 162cm, but made a mistake 10-15 years ago of buying too short. Reinhard's comment makes me think I should consider 169cm in the Crimson. Was not able to demo this ski this year but want to hop on the end-of-season prices. Any thoughts/recommendations?


 

The 169cm size should work well for you, if you like to avoid a ski that is too short. One of the guys attending the gathering at Jackson Hole was using the 169cm size and was very happy with it. He was a very good skier in the 160 to 175lbs range, I would guess. I purchased the 169cm Crimson for a family member who also is 130 lbs.

 

Michael

post #15 of 19

Thanks Michael that is very helpful!

 

post #16 of 19

I am more of an intermediate skier.  This is my fifth season skiing, however I am a very aggressive skier in wanting to do better, learn more, challenge myself and so on.  Last year, I spent most of the season off piste and in the powder with my Rossi Z9's.  I really enjoy the speed and stability of the Z9's on the groomers but found I had to work harder than what was necessary in the powder.

Would this be a good ski for me?  I do not want to buy a ski that I have to trade-up to a year or so but also do not want a ski that I can not handle skill-wise right now.

post #17 of 19

The answer depends upon a couple of facts with the most important one being whether you intend to keep your Z9 or replace it. You also should keep in mind that your self described ability level is probably part of the problem. A new pair of skis can help dramatically but won't be getting you on Warren Millers call list right away.

 

So.......................

 

If you want to replace the Z9 with the Crimson then the answer is maybe. The Crimson is wider (88mm waist vs your current 74mm) than what you have and the current (2011) version is slightly softer than the Z9. It would offer an incremental improvement in softer snow with depth and would grip and carve as well if not better.

 

OTH...if you want to supplement what you have, then the answer is no. The Crimson will not offer a significant enough improvement to really change your experience that much in snow of any depth. If you want a significant improvement, you will need to look at wider skis. There are literally dozens of good choices starting at roughly 100mm or so.

 

Salomon Shogun, Atomic Coax, Line Prophet 100, Blizzard One are all skis (98-105mm) that find much favor as everyday choices but will also give you enough improvement in deeper snow to be notable.

 

Moving up in width to 110mm and even wider can get you better and better powder performance. At some point or other you will go beyond the realm of everyday utility and start getting into skis that you probably wouldn't choose to ski on everyday. Naturally some do....but those skiers are not the norm.

 

SJ   

post #18 of 19

One more reply for ya'll...

 

my brother converted to snowboard about 8 years ago, but recently has been getting back on skis for a day here or there. I let him borrow my old skis cause they are a little easier and lighter, plus he is about 25 lbs and 4 inches smaller than me. The next day I gave him the Crimson skis.

 

Here's his assessment: "These are by far the best skis I have ever had"

post #19 of 19

I rented a pair last year and was so impressed that I had to find a pair to buy.  Unfortunately, I'm still looking for them.  I should have bought the rentals!

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