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Who gets through a season the CHEAPEST?

post #1 of 59
Thread Starter 
Who gets the most turns and spends the LEAST amount of money?

It seems to me that the people that are really committed to the sport have figured out all the tricks to getting by really inexpensively...

How do you do it?
post #2 of 59
Sure as hell not me!

I go out of my way to get deals, but I'm sure I get rolled up and smoked by others here who are closer to major mountains or get paid for turns.
post #3 of 59
I move to disqualify anybody that has any part time or full time job that is remotely skiing related off the bat.
post #4 of 59
Quote:
I move to disqualify anybody that has any part time or full time job that is remotely skiing related off the bat.
NO SOUP FOR YOU!
post #5 of 59
Outside of my most recent purchase None of my skis cost me over $100.00 out of pocket. My "newest" acquisitiion set me back $250.00. My boots cost $25.00 deivered, poles were free, add about 60 bucks worth of clothing. I take my lunch. I ski weekdays 95% of the time so it works out to about $35.00 per day. Utilizing ski gear that cost me between $100.00 and $300.00 that should last forever at 10 days per year.

Biggest variable cots I have is travel to the resort. I expect to pay about $85.00 in gas each day. So, I pay about $120/day to ski, but I saved a heck of a lot on gear to more than make up for that.

I think this year I'll start looking online for lift ticket discount coupons. I already checked with my company and they don't have any for NC skia reas, but they do have Showshoe and Wintergreen lift discounts..
post #6 of 59
The part time job is the reason I ski 70 days a year for less than you ski 10. Just saying.

Here's my breakdown:

Pass - $0
Hotels - $0
Lift tickets - $0
Gas money - $700 (less carpooler contributions of about $350)

Last year I bought no new gear, and I made $1000. That paid for all my lunches.
post #7 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by daysailer1 View Post
NO SOUP FOR YOU!
OK maybe a bit harsh. You can play but you have to add extimated cost of what you would pay should you not have work related "connections". You get an *
post #8 of 59
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post
I move to disqualify anybody that has any part time or full time job that is remotely skiing related off the bat.
I disagree... I think that is all part of it. If you are really committed to the sport and want to find ways to minimize the cost as much as possible, then a part time job at a ski area can make sense.

No exclusions whatsoever.
post #9 of 59
I'm more curious about the relationship of Families to those who's children are grown or don't have children skiing, as yet.

I used to ski cheaper when I hauled my nephew and his buddies to the hill. No way I could have afforded to buy them lunch, so we packed lunch.

Now that its just me and MrTC, we tend to go into one of the nicer restaurants at the resort, sit down and have a real grown up meal like real grown ups.
post #10 of 59
You should see some of the asian families near here. It is no surprise whatsoever to see them pull out a rice cooker and a 5-stack steel carry pot in the lodge.

My biggest cost is gas, then drinks, and not alcoholic ones either but coffee + refreshment.

Plan for this year: big thermos, big pushbutton jug, -20F sleeping bag.
post #11 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post
OK maybe a bit harsh. You can play but you have to add extimated cost of what you would pay should you not have work related "connections". You get an *
Thanks, Marc Ecko .

crgildart, your powers of frugality are astounding!

I'm a lunch packer, so me and the gal save there...but I'm a sucker for lodge beer so that takes a bit out. Last spring at Snowbird I met a dude on the lift who had an amazing system. In the spring when it never got cold enough to freeze beer (which has a lower freezing point than water...thanks solutes!) he said he stashed bottles and cans in hedges and tree roots all around the mountain, marked them on a map, and then would pick them up and drink them towards the end of each day. Now, I certainly wouldn't condone such behavior, and lord help him if I find out he forgot a bottle and was littering on a mountain, but that's pretty friggin' hilarious! And ballsy!

I'm not a local, so I have almost no chance of being super cheap. But I still get 10% off lift tickets with a promotions package from my old job.

Flight to SLC: $300
Staying at friend's for four days: $50 in groceries and beer.
Lift tix: $150
Beer: $20

::sigh:: There has to be a cheaper way to do this. Guess I could buy some skins and start hiking my way up the mountain! Ah, screw it, I just got promoted anyway!
post #12 of 59
Pass- provided by employer.
Skis/ boot/ poles/etc.- provided by manufacturers or reps

Last season's trips-

Revelstoke/ Big Mt./ Snow water heli/ JH : Airfare 1 way- $278, car rental- $570, everything else paid for by employer.

Whistler/ blackcomb- Paid for by ski manufacturer, 100% covered... I think I bought a round of drinks.

I buy my own clothing...

But don't worry, it all works out. My vehicle, my living situation and my bank account all suffer every bit as much as they would if I paid top dollar for everything. Welcome to the machine.
post #13 of 59
It seems to me that there is an intangible trade-off between just going to ski and getting a part-time job to afford more ski days. In my case I'm sure I wouldn't be as thrilled to go skiing if I have to spend 4+ hours teaching and only 2 freeskiing. And also in my case it would be impossible to leave my job just so I can be closer to the mountains.
post #14 of 59

Pretty Cheap...

I go to few places. Kids keep me too busy. But for my little home Mt, I get by pretty cheap...

Wife is an AD. Free comp pass from ski program.

Free corporate pass for the kids on weekends courtesy my adult league pal.

Free (used race) skis from an undisclosed corp source.

Free kids skis from same.

I need to buy boots, binding and helmets and coats for the kids. That is about it.

Race league $189.

Mt is 15 minutes from home. I get in about 30-40 days.
post #15 of 59
You can count me as a bottom dweller on this list.
post #16 of 59
Hm... last season for me might be my all time cheapest. Let's see, I probably had 35 days in between Jackson Hole, Moonlight Basin, and Vail. Um, didn't pay a dime for lift tickets.. didn't spend anything on skis or tunes, let's see.. clothes.. um..

Well, I bought a pair of ski pants for $50. The only other costs I had were driving and food. Hm.. and I was able to expense some of that.

Gas + food + ski pants makes the total probably around: $500

Now, if I can just figure out a way not to eat..
post #17 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richie-Rich View Post
You can count me as a bottom dweller on this list.
Me too.
post #18 of 59
I feel I do quite well when you consider I travel from the deep south.

Last year I drove 5 hours each way to Nashville to take advantage of non stop air fare to Denver for $ 112.00 RT.(united)
nice savings for a family of 5 (4 teens)
Thanks to "Air fare Watch dog" and the daily news letter.
This year I have 3 sleepers on Amtrak using reward points
This is our 3rd trip to Denver by Rail and we love it

I mostly Ski only the Gems and use gems cards
Several areas offer a FREE day of sking, Sol vista , A- basin,
Just work around the black outs.
Loveland= $38 day passes all season .
most other offer at least $10 off
They also offer free sking for 5th graders and discounted for
6th graders


I own my on gear but rent the kids stuff at Silverthorne for
$11 a day
age 12 and under= $8 (5 day rental)

I stay in Leadville or Georgetown ,rooms with 2 queens can be had for under $70
Look for Free Breakfast (Super 8)

Dont rent at the airport ,rent at stapleton and turn in the the airport
Last year my Hertz mini van was $279 per week.(ski rack extra)
This year I have a Premium reserved for the same price christmas week
Use Priceline for the Airport hotel if needed.
$38 per nite last year (4 Star)


We make our lunches the night before and buy Hi proten snacks at the super markets
Ski cooper and Loveland have decent priced food if you do want to eat out a day or 2

Hope this helps someone save a buck or two while having a great time
post #19 of 59
Ski patrol since 1990, before that had not skied in close to 20 years, played the first two years on Lange Pros, Look Nevada Grand Prix , with leases, mounted on a K2 SL comp (all circa 1979 or earlier). Borrowed some gel filled shin pads to keep the old langes from destroying my shins.

Bought boots first , some new, old stock White Nordica something or others on closeout for around 65 dollars, and some Salomon bindings (for about 35) for them new fangled DIN soles---all in year three. Mounted on the K2's, year 3 I was styling!

When did Rossi 7Xk's come out?? 1993 ish or so??

That was the first new gear purchase since I started skiing again. I had to pay the equavilent of full price (just shy of 700 as I recall) for them with Bindings, Marker somethings"s, since I was swappin services with the ski shops advertising guy, I did stuff for the ad guy for "free", he did ads for teh ski shop for "free" I got skis for "free" --- I wanted pro price---ski shop guy objected since he was trading ad space at retail, so I relented and raised my rate to the ad guy to compensate!

there was one more new pair of boots in there somewhere too-----

From 1990 until around 2001 I rarely went anywhere other than my ski partol hill, so in that time frame were talking maybe 1000 bucks for gear (interesting that none was pro formed), no lift tickets, no clothing to speak of and the kid skied free---when he wanted too.

From 2000 , roughly, to today is a different animal! a yearly ski trip that costs easily a grand with tickets travel and car.

In around 2001 I bought Volkl P40 somethings with another pair of Marker M8.2's . These were out of my pocket with no trades for services and cost 600 plus near the seasons end.


Now days ist a few hundred a year in different gear, double that in years where skis are involved.

When i look back on it -- I was a real miser for the decade of 1990 to 2000.
post #20 of 59
For the past five years I've spent under $30 a day for tickets, brown bagged my lunches and paid at most $25 a day for gas to the mountain. I also used long paid-for retro gear from around the Cretaceous. I went hog wild this year and bought one pair of skis/bindings for $100 and another pair for $400 and a pair of boots for around $350. Gas will be about $5-10 more per trip this year.
post #21 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by skier_j View Post

When i look back on it -- I was a real miser for the decade of 1990 to 2000.
Dude, you don't even know miserly. The $8 or so that it costs me to ski each day now is nothing compared to the 2 years I spent living in a cabin in Alaska. Hiked all my turns out the back door of the cabin on a pair of basically free skis. All my clothes were surplus Finnish and Swedish army clothing I got for nothing. Total cost for 2 years of skiing = absolute $0. Managed to ski 100 days in a row one season that way.
post #22 of 59
I don't know if I can drill down to the past penny but believe it or not, i pay for almost all of my gear by selling other gear. I paid $679 for my Steamboat pass but if i ski with clients, I write it off. Almost all of my airfare is covered by FF Miles and I stay at my place in SB and my friends places at J-hole and whistler. Food and all is extra but you would spend $ on that at home anyway. We cook in most nights and split the costs.
post #23 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by reducedfatoreo View Post

Last spring at Snowbird I met a dude on the lift who had an amazing system. In the spring when it never got cold enough to freeze beer (which has a lower freezing point than water...thanks solutes!) he said he stashed bottles and cans in hedges and tree roots all around the mountain, marked them on a map, and then would pick them up and drink them towards the end of each day. Now, I certainly wouldn't condone such behavior, and lord help him if I find out he forgot a bottle and was littering on a mountain, but that's pretty friggin' hilarious! And ballsy!
Try using a heineken light mini-keg. It will fit into a backpack and you just carry it to the top on the first run, pick out a nice stash spot and drop some plexi pint glasses with it for you & your friends. Kegs get niiiice and cold in ze snow. Visit as necessary. Pick up when done. Cheap. Easy. No lodge needed.
post #24 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by reducedfatoreo View Post
Thanks, Marc Ecko .

In the spring when it never got cold enough to freeze beer (which has a lower freezing point than water...thanks solutes!) he said he stashed bottles and cans in hedges and tree roots all around the mountain, marked them on a map, and then would pick them up and drink them towards the end of each day. Now, I certainly wouldn't condone such behavior, and lord help him if I find out he forgot a bottle and was littering on a mountain, but that's pretty friggin' hilarious! And ballsy!
.

We used to stash some beer in the AM and stop off on our last run to enjoy a cold one. One time go a patroller a bit miffed as we came skiing down well behind the afternoon sweep.

These days I, sadly, usually end up paying full price or close to it for lift tix. Generally stay in cheaper lodging. Drive time to mid sized mountains is 2&1/2 - 3 hours. To bigger hills about 4 so lots of money for gas too.

I tend to use my gear for a long time though and save bucks there.

Ahh but i do miss the days of free lifts and gear....
post #25 of 59
College pass to Sunapee-Cannon-Gunstock is 220....not bad at all in my book
post #26 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by U.P. Racer View Post
I disagree... I think that is all part of it. If you are really committed to the sport and want to find ways to minimize the cost as much as possible, then a part time job at a ski area can make sense.

No exclusions whatsoever.
1980 thru 1982 I skied completely free because I worked as a ski instructor. My parents paid for my skis, ar, gas, and meals
post #27 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Harry_Morgan View Post
Dude, you don't even know miserly. The $8 or so that it costs me to ski each day now is nothing compared to the 2 years I spent living in a cabin in Alaska. Hiked all my turns out the back door of the cabin on a pair of basically free skis. All my clothes were surplus Finnish and Swedish army clothing I got for nothing. Total cost for 2 years of skiing = absolute $0. Managed to ski 100 days in a row one season that way.
yeeps, now thats miserly!
post #28 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Salvuccim View Post
College pass to Sunapee-Cannon-Gunstock is 220....not bad at all in my book
What college?
post #29 of 59
I'm cheap and careful, but gas is what's killing me. Try to get discounts on tickets when ever possible and do pretty well. Get out during the week on my 6/7 pass. Stay at the lodge for $20. when I feel rich.

The pain is building, Abbey needs new skis and boots and she has played second fiddle to the boy, so it's her turn. It's gonna cost. Her season pass is paid for.
post #30 of 59
Approx 40 ski days.
Colorado Pass $439
Copper Pass $0 (coaching)
Gas (total) $750
Lodging when I don't day trip $0 (part time use of family ski home)
Food on mountain (total) $300 (I usually brown bag it)
Total Cost = $1139

Total pay for coaching approx $1700 so I MAKE money for skiing.
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