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Visualization

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 
Do you use visualization in your skiing or teaching? Do you find that it works? When teaching fitness, I find that this works for some people. However, highly cerebral types often find it difficult to use their imagination. Here's an article
on the subject.

Thoughts?

BTW: Feel free to make a comment on the article on the actual page, or on my Colorado Mountain Fitness Page.
Leave your homepage URL, and I'll place it in my permanent link file!

OOPS! Just realized that the page is not yet live. Check back in a few days. Meanwhile, read the fitness stuff.
post #2 of 15
How can they be considered cerebral when they can't use their minds to visualize ? Smart people have no imagination ?

Maybe some need to have every variable carefully plotted and considered and go with that instead of following their creative side.
Often people over think skiing. I know I do .
Like the wise person once said . Shut up and ski. You're thinking too much . Act don't react.
post #3 of 15
There are folks--of various intellectual powers--who can picture in their mind a scene, but who can't put themselves into the picture. They can visualize what they'd see skiing down a slope, but they can't imagine what the person behind or beside them might see when watching them.

You look in the mirror and know (or sometimes not) your face, but do you imagine what your face looks like while you're addressing--and looking at--someone else's face?

This is why watching video of ourselves skiing often is disconcerting.
post #4 of 15
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by GarryZ View Post
How can they be considered cerebral when they can't use their minds to visualize ? Smart people have no imagination ?

Maybe some need to have every variable carefully plotted and considered and go with that instead of following their creative side.
Often people over think skiing. I know I do .
Like the wise person once said . Shut up and ski. You're thinking too much . Act don't react.
Quote:
There are folks--of various intellectual powers--who can picture in their mind a scene, but who can't put themselves into the picture. They can visualize what they'd see skiing down a slope, but they can't imagine what the person behind or beside them might see when watching them.

You look in the mirror and know (or sometimes not) your face, but do you imagine what your face looks like while you're addressing--and looking at--someone else's face?

This is why watching video of ourselves skiing often is disconcerting.
I think that's called having a warped view of one's skills!


Oh, and BTW, the page is now LIVE!

Check it out, and if you're an instructor, or someone with a ski-related business, make a comment and leave a link to your page. I will then import the link to my "links" column.
post #5 of 15
I am of the school of thought that believes visualization is one of the most important tools to success in sports; some say in anything that poses a challenge. I have read many articles and interviews about bodybuilding, all of the top guys rely heavily on visualization to achieve their peaks in development. At the pinnacle of my physical development it was the visualization of my muscles, understanding what they were doing, how I wanted them to look, seeing the weight being lifted and feeling lighter and lighter as it went up that got me to achieve what I did. I try to use the same type of imagery while skiing. It relies on calling upon images of the people who do it best and then superimposing myself in the same situation and executing as the pro does.
post #6 of 15

Visualization of Golf shots

Its my experience that if the picture isn't clear the outcome will be rather random. If one focuses on the obstacles to avoid , one is quite likely to get first hand knowledge of the obstacle. Conversely if there is a clear vision of the desired shot and outcome, a smile of success is of much higher probability.

I like to 'feel it' as I visualize, get lost in the thought of what I am visualizing; even while sitting in a chair at home. Let the muscles twitch. I may have read about what I attempt to put into muscle memory by visualization first. And without any visualiztion what so ever, I've remembered something I read or heard and tried it on the slope to success (or eventual success).
post #7 of 15
It's my belief that at lower levels of performance, visualization is overkill. Many skiers typically first start visualizing during gates (see the rut, see the rise line), bump (see the path, see groups of bumps) or tree skiing (see the spaces not the trees). But each of these are only a stepping stone to the visualization techniques that top athletes typically do. I first gained awareness that I was doing the visualization thing when I started skiing extreme steeps. At the top, I had to plan every turn before I could go over the edge. It did not matter that the plan would go out the window by the second turn - I had to have 15 turns planned to exact detail in order to start. There are some who have been led to the belief that visualization can replace skills development. Other than overcoming mental blocks preventing access to the next higher level of skiing (e.g. moving from unconscious competence to conscious incompetence), I'm not in that camp.
post #8 of 15
Rusty has a point. Visualization is not a replacement for skills. Visualization can bring forth a new movement pattern,,, or can take you down the mountain on a particular line, skiing in a particular manner,,, but only if the skills required to execute the goal have been developed. Good skills not yet acquired will seldom just spontaneously appear.

But visualization does have a place in the development of those skills. Anytime a coach does a demo for a student, and the student internalizes the visual image he/she sees of a proper exectution, then tries to emulate it, visualization has occured.

Over time, with practice, the detail of the visualization process can be intensified and serve the user of this valuable learning tool even better.

Now, not to divert the thread, but there's a zation skill I assign as much, if not more, importance to as visualization. Feelization. Getting in touch with sensory awareness of bottom of the foot pressure, and ski edge feedback as you ski. Crucial. Especially for the learning intermediate.

When you get good at visualization, feelization becomes an integral part of it. You can actually feel what it's going to feel like.
post #9 of 15
Thread Starter 
"Feelization!" Love it, love it, love it! Can I borrow it? Please?
post #10 of 15
Please do, Lisamarie.
post #11 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richie Rich
At the pinnacle of my physical development it was the visualization of my muscles, understanding what they were doing, how I wanted them to look, seeing the weight being lifted and feeling lighter and lighter as it went up that got me to achieve what I did. I try to use the same type of imagery while skiing.
For me, the sequence of Key Words I've highlighted from RR's post are almost exactly the process I find most efficient at learning pretty much anything physical. I would add that having a Target Idea or Concept in mind is first and formost a prerequisite. If we've no specific idea what we're trying to learn then we're not likely to learn it unless/until we stumble over it randomly.


With a target in mind to visualize I could just go out taking wild stabs at it - but for me it works way better to try and understand the movement patterns required and figure out how I want to proceed in my attempt.

With an idea how to proceed, I can run the film in my mind and end up seeing the likely outcome. I often need to see a variety of plots in this mind-film to find a plot that's likely to end well for the main character (me).

With a desirable plot in mind I then implement a kind of tactile review of the plan which involves reviewing the film again but this time feeling the motions and patterns required to support the visualization.

With all this in place I'm far more able to a achieve the target movement pattern on the first try, or at least come very close.



For me, visualization of intended actions started when I was in the Terrible Two's. I still clearly remember pre-visualizing some very hazardous exploits, some of which came out well, others that ended in disaster. Because of this I believe action-visualization probably starts very early in every child's life and is a foundation of their learning process. Since the brain wires (and continually re-wires) itself based on what we do and how we do it, those who work at visualizing results tend to get better at visualizing over time (regardless of age).


I think there is a fundamental difference between Visualizing physical movements for the doing of a thing vs Planning a sequence of future actions.

I too visualize a game plan before tossing my body down a hazardously steep chute like some pinball hoping I'll athletically respond to whatever comes. But this feels very external to me rather than the internalized sense I get from true visualization of myself executing a detailed movement pattern. 'Seeing' the location I'm going to make a turn and estimating my ability to turn successfully in that spot isn't quite the same as visualizing the detailed internal nature of that turn which is (I think) the dividing line between the two.


Not sure but it seems like there would be a legitimate ( ) word for this out there somewhere. 'Feelization' certainly captures the essence of the idea but there must be a long established term for the concept by now. I've looked around in the past but all I've ever found are wordy descriptions rather than a term or phrase. If nothing is found, maybe Rick should run off to the Term Patent Office (ie; Wikipedia) and submit his entry.


.ma
post #12 of 15
Thread Starter 
"Feelization" is somewhat similar to a term I sometimes use: "Snowprioception"
post #13 of 15
Imagery is the term I have heard used in the past. Dr. Paul Lam an internationally recognized authority on teaching methodology for martial arts in his book "Teaching Tai Chi Effectively" devotes an entire chapter to this subject. Most good teachers already do this by encouraging their students to imagine what it will feel like when they practice or perform movements, tasks, or as in tai chi their form work. Imagining what it will feel like, Rick's Feelization. Visualzition puts us in the observer role, while imagery puts us in the doer role.

This ties in directly with the term "imaging" which is defined as using mental images to control bodily processes, or succeed in some endevor that one has visualized in advance. Such as imagining the air is water as we move through it, imagining the resistance of the water as it slows our movements down ,mking them more gentle and progressive.

That's my take anyway.
post #14 of 15
I will go so far as to say that if you are unable to visualize, you will not achieve/succeed...unless its just dumb luck.

Mike Tyson, in an interview when he was peaking, said that when he entered a ring he just pictured in his mind (visualized), ripping the opponents head off with his punch....he nearly did, nearly every time.
post #15 of 15
That would explain a lot if Mike Tyson was thinking about Vincent Van Gogh just before one of those fights...


I was poking around looking at the difference between proprioception and kinesthesia on wikipedia and thinking they'd probably have put a statement about the concept there, but nada.

.ma
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