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T-track tuning and waxing bench

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 
Ever since I turned Lou Dawson onto building a T-track bench a couple years ago, it's been on my To-Do list to set up my workbench with a t-track.

I finally got tired of my 18 year old particle board top and cut in a channel, painted and polyurethaned, and installed a t-track, and made another sliding 'Cinch & XC Cart' for my Cinch vise:






















Now I'm set for quick changes from base to edge work, long skis to short skis or snowboards, XC, skate, tele, AT, along with odd clamping sometimes needed at the bench.
post #2 of 12
Nice work looks good and clean.
post #3 of 12
Thanks for the push towards T-track, Terry! Here is my "portable" version.





T-track installed and bottom bracket mount fabricated (but waiting on pads from Park Tool).



Oh wait, this is supposed to be about ski tuning:



I'll add some stickyness, probably in the form of silicone, to the top of the supports. Right now the stain/varnish is drying....

My "lasso" style clamp works great. I left the piece of wood for the clamp mount in the shop where i made it, so i used a few clamps to hold everything down for the picture.



It's nice to finally have a vise that will clamp on the side:





For $2.50 these clamps provide plenty of holding power, and are adjustable for different thickness skis:




I was a little worried that the supports/clamps would not have enough surface area to hold a board. I gave this a good shake and it isn't going anywhere:



I'm now in for a little more then $30 (which is what Philpug paid for his sawhorse & top), but I still can't touch the versatility and ruggedness of this stand with anything purchased commercially.

All that is remaining is to add the bottom bracket support pads (for the bike), rubber to the supports and install the center clamp to a slide so that it mounts in the T-track.
post #4 of 12
Thread Starter 
Nice job. Kyle.

It's also nice to see that you 'get it' regarding t-tracks and knobs and the versatility and utility of them (along with other shop clamps and setups). The T-track concept has been the basis for the Tools4Boards Terminator stand and vises for years (and forthcoming accessories, stay tuned ). You're only limited by your imagination of the possibilities.

I like the bench/tuning stand height for working on bike drive trains and was toying with the idea of using a bike fork skewer and dropping the front compared to yours to elevating the cogs and derailleur higher. Maybe an adjustable front post is the call?

Can you provide a close up of the bottom bracket support?

An sliding lasso clamp is slick when you are dealing with multiple skis and snowboard lengths like changing from kid to adult boards. In your case it may not be that important, but worth considering since you have the track and knobs. I've been making them out of hardwood with great results, nut a milled aluminum one would be pretty sweet. The cam clamp is also faster than using knobs......
post #5 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alpinord View Post
I like the bench/tuning stand height for working on bike drive trains and was toying with the idea of using a bike fork skewer and dropping the front compared to yours to elevating the cogs and derailleur higher. Maybe an adjustable front post is the call?
The one constraint here is the width of the table. On mine, the table is too wide to have the bottom bracket located lower on the table, the pedals will not clear.

Quote:
Can you provide a close up of the bottom bracket support?
I'll post a pick when I get the pad installed. I wasn't sure what to do here so I looked into purchasing a mount from Park. They decided to just mail me one...

Quote:
An sliding lasso clamp is slick when you are dealing with multiple skis and snowboard lengths like changing from kid to adult boards. In your case it may not be that important, but worth considering since you have the track and knobs. I've been making them out of hardwood with great results, nut a milled aluminum one would be pretty sweet. The cam clamp is also faster than using knobs......
Exactly! Mine (which I left somewhere last week) is wood, only because I didn't want to cut into the rest of the aluminum stock I have left. That is reserved for some riser blocks/mount plates for my next pair of skis!
post #6 of 12
Bottom bracket closeups, as requested:






I was trying to buy this from Park Tool, but they were very generous and just sent me one! It is a very simple part though, and if anyone wants the dimensions (I would probably end up making a scale print) just send me a PM.

I'm going to add a strap later today for some added stability. I just got caught in a rainstorm and now the bike is in need of a thorough cleaning...


EDIT:

Terry, the Park stand has a beam that is only about 1.5" wide, so it clears inside the pedals:



That is how they get away with having the bottom bracket and fork mounts right on the beam/table. I wanted a little width so I could lay out tools and materials, so I had to essentially emulate the ride position with my stand.

I could have made a cantilever 1.5" beam of the back of my stand, then mount the bb to that and the fork right to the work surface. I wanted to keep things simple and compact for when I am moving around.
post #7 of 12
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the pics. I thought you made your own bottom bracket support and missed that it was a Park item. A lasso clamp and cleat could secure the bike as will the strap.

I was thinking dropping the front while leaving the bottom bracket post as is (or higher if needed for clearance) could rotate the rear cassette and derailleur to whatever level was best for a particular task and visibility. Currently, I sit on a stool or rotate the bike on the seat stand. to get an easier working elevation.
post #8 of 12
Thread Starter 
Bump. A little food for thought for those getting into bench building mode and missed this thread. I can't recommend enough the versatility of a track system for tuning vises and other home projects.

If I was into conventional vises I'd seriously consider whacking off the clamp and put them on a t-track or tuning stand rail system.


At a whole other level, check out these new bad boys from SVST:

post #9 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alpinord View Post
At a whole other level, check out these new bad boys from SVST:

And who do I have to sell my soul to, and for how much to get these beauties?

Mike
post #10 of 12
Thread Starter 
The SVST Pro Vise isn't ready for prime time yet, and will cost at least 8 bills or so, though not sure yet. Here's the catalog description:

Quote:
The SVST Pro System Vise is the finest vise on the market today. It is machined from stainless steel and aircraft aluminum. Designed for the professional technician in mind. Tip and tail supports adjust vertically as well as horizontally along the machined aluminum dove-tailed track. This is not a mold injected vise that clamps to a hobby bench. This is the real deal. Jaws open to 145cm. Interchangeable vise jaws, speed wheel adjust for side edge work. We want this vise to be the best it can be, it is in the testing phase at the time of catalog publication.
HTH

Still wanna sell your soul?
post #11 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alpinord View Post
The SVST Pro Vise isn't ready for prime time yet, and will cost at least 8 bills or so, though not sure yet. Here's the catalog description:



HTH

Still wanna sell your soul?
HOLY CRAP!!!

I need to start making vises..
post #12 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by krp8128 View Post
HOLY CRAP!!!

I need to start making vises..
I have an uncle who ownes a machine shop that makes tooling for the aerospace industry. A new business venture? hmmmmmmm

Mike
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