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Skiing and Urban NE Colleges - Page 2

post #31 of 46
Having gone to MIT I can tell you that you won't have much time for skiing if you plan on doing all the work. It's basically a 24 / 7 environment. Unlike Harvard down the river which has a slacker program.
post #32 of 46
Thread Starter 
engineering considerations include materials, optics, nanotechnolgy, robotics, AI

fine arts considerations include fine arts/studio, film, photography
I have read about several programs which combine math with art so I would definitely consider a program like that
post #33 of 46
I'm from the Philly area, also attended a rather strenuous college program, and completed a double major in the sciences. Pretty much what you're signing up for is a LOT of stress with minimal time for skiing.

Your biggest problem may not be where to ski - it will probably be getting there. Having a car as a student is difficult, with parking in urban areas being a huge hassle. Also, all the skiers stuck here on the east coast generally have the same idea as you do - namely, on weekends get the hell out of the cities and hit the slopes.

For Philly, those slopes are usually the Poconos, with Blue, Camelback, and Elk being the ones mentioned earlier. Camelback is the biggest, but Elk is probably the best skier's mountain. (If you like the terrain park, you have to check out Bear Creek - it's amazing.)

I would wait until you pick a school and get settled in to worry about your ski opportunities. You said your priority in college choice is the programs offered and the kind of experiences offered by the city. Focus on those for the time being.

Good luck!
post #34 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by NaturalSelection View Post
For Philly, those slopes are usually the Poconos, with Blue, Camelback, and Elk being the ones mentioned earlier. Camelback is the biggest, but Elk is probably the best skier's mountain. (If you like the terrain park, you have to check out Bear Creek - it's amazing.)
True about the Poconos for the Philly area; I used to teach at Shawnee Mountain when I was in Philly. Now in NYC I try to hit up the Catskills or the Adirondack/VT areas for something a little higher than the little hills in the Poconos .

Elk's one of my favorites in the Poconos, but Snö Mountain (formerly Montage) also has some equally great terrain (relatively speaking, of course), and is not too far from Elk.

Good luck with your choices! Do let us know what you end up going with, and post more details about what you're looking for out of your college experience!
post #35 of 46
If you are locked in on an urban school with an emphasis on engineering as well as fine arts, you are looking in the right places. Skiing will, out of necessity, be secondary. Only Harvard races at the NCAA level, and they are always in the basement of the NEISA. If you have limited racing experience, you might be able to make the Harvard team. There's no way you'd come close to racing on the team at Middlebury, Dartmouth, etc. The other schools you are considering have club racing programs which, while they have a few very good racers, are mostly for the fun of going to races with your friends. Go to the school that give you what you want academically, culturally and socially. It sounds like skiing is a priority for you, but it's ranked well down the list behind your academic interests. Stick with MIT, Harvard, Penn and Columbia.
post #36 of 46
There's might be a disjunct here between career goals and concern with being near good mountains. Truth, it's easier to find good mountains than good careers. Anyway, if based on proximity, and need a big city, no-brainer: Boston. Two hours from good skiing, under 3 from excellent, and lots to choose from. (both slopes and schools, plus the best baseball there is)
post #37 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by beyond View Post
Two hours from good skiing, under 3 from excellent
What mountains are those and relative to what?
post #38 of 46

Dartmouth and Engineering....

Quote:
Originally Posted by newfydog View Post
Dartmouth offer no engineering.
Um....Thayer School of Engineering at Dartmouth....since 1867. As an undergrad at Dartmouth in the early 80's I was buds with a hard partying bunch who were engineering fiends, both undergrad and grad. Sick bunch, I tell you, compared to us Econ majors.

Big engineering culture in Hanover....
post #39 of 46

Sugarbush from Albany....driving tweak suggestion.

Please see below for a suggested tweak I believe saves time. When you travel north on Route 30 in VT (see below), take a right onto Route 73 and head East to Brandon. From there continue on 73 over Brandon Gap to Route 100 just south of Rochester. Take Route 100 North to Warren/Waitsfield.

Driving time and route clearing/conditions-wise, I believe the most reliable, quickest route. We are near Syracuse, and our place in Warren prompted me to do a time, distance, road conditions analysis of best route from CNY to Sugarbush. This tweak on top of the previous route suggestion below, IMHO, is most reliably quickest. YMMV.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ski the East View Post
Gotama:

I make it to MRG from Albany in 2.5 to 2.75 hrs from Exit 9 off the Northway (Clifton Park NY). It takes about 45 minutes to get from I-87 Exit 9 to I-87 Exit 20.

Take Northway (I-87) north to exit 20 (just past Great Escape). At end of exit take a left onto Rt 9. Go approx. 1/4 mile (past outlet malls) to Rt 149 East (right turn onto Rt 149). Take 149 E all the way to Fort Ann, NY. In Fort Ann Go left on Rt 4 East (you're really going more North than East on Rt 4 at this point, Rt 4 starts heading East once you get past Whitehall, NY). Stay on Rt 4 until you get to Lake Bomoseen in Vermont. Take the Rt 30 exit and go north on Rt 30 (left turn) to Middlebury, where Rt 30 ends at Rt 7. Go north on Rt 7, then turn right onto Rt 17, which you follow all the way to Mad River's parking lot. It's fairly straightforward, and much faster (at least 30-45 minutes) than going through Rutland and up Rt 100.

To get from MRG to Sugarbush, just keep following Rt. 17 through MRG's parking lot and down the other side of Gen. Stark Mtn. to Rt 100. Go right (south) on Rt 100 to the Sugarbush Access Road.

The climb up Rt 17 to MRG's parking lot is steep, and a portion of the road may be closed in bad weather (I have never had a problem, but I know that they do close the gap from time to time). If your daughter isn't comfortable driving a relatively steep route in bad weather, the better choice may be to follow Rt 4 east all the way to Rutland, VT and then head north on Rt 100 'till you get to the Sugarbush Access Road.

Note that you can trace the route I provided and print out turn-by-turn maps from Google Maps (or mapquest) for your daughter.
post #40 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by jamesgig View Post
MIT says that they have one of only 40 varsity ski teams in the country, but when you look through the website, the dates are all from the 1990's. Does anyone know if there is still a team?
Ahh, that first test website that was designed early on in my coaching days at MIT still creates confusion -- somehow we never figured out how to gain access to modifying it after the woman who designed it graduated...
Anyway, given your various criteria, Harvard and MIT both seem like sensible choices. If you were janesgig, then you could certainty make the NCAA varsity team at either school. As jamesgig, you still have an outside chance given your minimal racing background, so definitely apply early and then spend the rest of your senior year running gates as often as possible!
If you make the team at either school, you'll ski a lot, but you'll also drive a lot, so you'd better be focused on the difficult juggling act between academics and athletics.
If you don't make the ski team, you'll almost never ski. (Having coached both Harvard and MIT, cutting kids in the fall from the team always felt bad, because I knew that I was basically taking away their skiing opportunities while school was in session.)
post #41 of 46
as a former racer and coach at Bates... i'll chime in and say that your chances of making the carnival team at a NCAA school like Bates could be tough (based on your racing background that you provided).

having said that... when i coached at Bates, we had a thriving development team or "B" team that skied 4 days/week (mid-week) and raced on the weekends at local races throughout ME. i am guessing we probably average 70+ days/season. not too shabby in terms of snow time. once in awhile one of our top development team kids would then get to travel to a carnival race if one of the A team kids were hurt or sick. just a thought to throw in there....

oh and in terms of engineering.... while Bates did NOT have an engineering dept, it did have a 3/2 program with some top engineering schools like RPI, UMich etc., where you did 3 years at Bates and 2 years at the engineering school and you get 2 degrees. i had a buddy on the ski team who pulled that off. it was tough for him, but he did it!

good luck in your choice of schools.... hopefully one day my daughters will have those kind of decisions to make also!
post #42 of 46
If the "urban" part is important to you, you might consider McGill. Nice, classic campus located right in the heart of a great cosmopolitan city.

Tremblant, the Laurentiens, Eastern Townships, Jay Peak are all easily doable as a day trip. Just a bit further out gets you to Whiteface, Smugglers, Stowe, Mount Saint Anne, Le Massif.
post #43 of 46

C'mon, DropKick....

Quote:
Originally Posted by DropKickMurphy View Post
If the "urban" part is important to you, you might consider McGill. Nice, classic campus located right in the heart of a great cosmopolitan city.

Tremblant, the Laurentiens, Eastern Townships, Jay Peak are all easily doable as a day trip. Just a bit further out gets you to Whiteface, Smugglers, Stowe, Mount Saint Anne, Le Massif.
....tell the kid the real reason to consider going to McGill.....the women of Montreal ! Beauty + sweetness + french tinged english acents + the FACT each and every one of them has skied since birth = the most sublime cosmopolitan talent show ANYWHERE on the planet. So there, kid.....your Uncle Orange has spoken.

P.S. Academics at McGill are, apparently, okay, too....
post #44 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by DropKickMurphy View Post
If the "urban" part is important to you, you might consider McGill. Nice, classic campus located right in the heart of a great cosmopolitan city.
I love montreal but getting work can be difficult unless you speak french and it would be really tough for a non-citizen.
post #45 of 46
I currently work at Penn and live in Philly. I also coach ski racing (J3-J5) at Bear Creek, which is about an hour from Philly. Bear Creek is very small, but has a great NASTAR program. I graduated from and raced at Lehigh University, which races against Columbia. Lehigh at that time (1999-2002) was by far the best team, but we had kids that ranged from Killington Mountain School racers to kids that just wanted to learn to be better skiers. We trained two nights a week at Blue Mtn, which has recently built a great race trail. I'm pretty sure Penn doesn't train during the week, but they travel Sat & Sun to races throughout PA and WV. Both the NJ Conference (Lehigh, Columbia, Princeton, Lafayette Junior College, Rutgers, Fairfield) and PA Conference (Penn, WVU, Penn State, Maryland, etc.) are what you make of them. There are some pretty competative racers and also just a bunch of people skiing and having a ton of fun.
post #46 of 46

Got your apps done?

FYI - Harvard has dumped a bunch of resources into fieldling a competitve NCAA ski team. Their new coach is a great guy (All American) who races in our league at Wachusett. I do not think jg has much of a shot at making the HU team given his one year of racing.

As for the list of schools - brains are one thing - but did you also discover a cure for cancer, build a better rice plant that grows on cement with no water, invent voice recognition software that actually works, run a cartel of international arms traders and make eagle scout too? Let us know where you get in. Then we can narrow the choices for you.

BTW...Bates? Bwahahahahahahahahaa! (Bowdoin '91).
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