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Speaking of silicone

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 
My new-last-spring Tecnica TCs have a liner interior that grabs the wool socks I'm so fond of, causing them to bunch up and form wrinkles. The shop told me to spray the insides of the liners with silicone, which I tried and it worked. I was told I might have to repeat treatment a couple times a season if I ski every day. I'm still concerned about the long-term effects of exposing my feet to any residual silicone if I continue this practice. Is there something else that will make the liner more slippery?
post #2 of 14
Foot powder?
I think silicone is inert, but it will probably mess up some good wool socks.
post #3 of 14
I had these for a couple years, used them everyday with silicone spray or WD 40, mostly silicone. Lots of old timers here had used the silicone with no adverse effects.
post #4 of 14
One of the primary justifications for the existence of fabric softeners and dryer sheets in this world is to make fibers slip past each other more easily. The only question is which ones to use and how to apply them.

I'm still stuck on
Quote:
new-last-spring Tecnica TCs
as I haven't seen new Tecnica TCs





since 1998.
post #5 of 14
Thread Starter 
Ahh, old fart memory loss. It's the Tecnica Diablo Flame.

I use fabric softener dryer sheets for the socks, and it didn't prevent the problem. Are you suggesting I get a liquid fabric softener and spray it on the liners?

Crgildart, I joked with my ski school colleagues about those among us who had to juice up their Hansons in the locker room EVERY DAY to get 'em to slide over their socks. We were calling them the hair spray boys. I never knew it was a silicone spray they used.
post #6 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kneale Brownson View Post
I use fabric softener dryer sheets for the socks, and it didn't prevent the problem. Are you suggesting I get a liquid fabric softener and spray it on the liners?
That's one thought.

I was trying to think of a way to use the tumble sheets along with a hot air boot dryer.
post #7 of 14
you want to use Food grade Quality Silicone spray. it is what I use on my Dry Suit (waterskiing).

I have a can sitting right here in front of me.

Aquaseal silicone Spray

Made by McNett Outdoor

Bellingham, WA

Says

Environmentally Safe
Contains NO CFC's
Food Grade Quality

Meets the quality standards of FDA No. 121.1099 (complete formulation, not for human consumption)

colorless, odorless Non-Staining, non-drip

Sports and recreation uses:

Snow ski bindings
Eases ski boot entry


http://www.mcnett.com/

Click on Scuba Diving and water sports then on Lubricants and Protectants, then Silicone Spray

http://mcnett.baron-co.com/images/ed...neSpray-ts.doc

http://www.joediveramerica.com/page/JDA/PROD/20414
post #8 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kneale Brownson View Post
Crgildart, I joked with my ski school colleagues about those among us who had to juice up their Hansons in the locker room EVERY DAY to get 'em to slide over their socks. We were calling them the hair spray boys. I never knew it was a silicone spray they used.
Come to think of it I did have somewhat of an early 80s spike/mullet dew at that time. Fortunately, I ditched the Hansons right before I started working in the ski school Migrated from freedogger gear to racing gear for that gig
post #9 of 14
Krytox is also available in food-grade.
post #10 of 14
Why not just try a different sock?
Many thin, liner socks are polypro or something similar; very slippery.
I have used just thin liners for years and loved them, I have found that unless you are expecting very cold temps, (zero or so), they are plenty warm. I would have a hard time spraying silicone spray in my boots, doesn't sound too good for them.
post #11 of 14
Thread Starter 
Thanks, Atomicman and Comprex. I'm thinking you guys have solved my problem.

Zog, in addition to being fond of the particular socks I wear, I have what my wife calls a lifetime supply. I've gotten five years so far (and at least a couple more to come) out of the first dozen pairs and I have two more dozen in reserve.
post #12 of 14
I don't think there are any health issues. There are a couple of side issues, though.

People who work with certain adhesive processes are not allowed to wear rubber bracelets (Live Strong and similar ones) because the tiny amount of residual silicone from the mold release agents can cause enough contamination to make the glues fail. So if you might want to hold off on piecing back together grandma's broken china.

I read a caution somewhere about silicone and contact lenses, too. I think that one is because of too much sticking -- they are made of similar materials and residual on your fingers can mess up the surface finish. I haven't confirmed this experimentally, but to be safe if I need to spray silicone I either wear gloves or wait 24 hours before handling contact lenses.
post #13 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by ZOG View Post
Why not just try a different sock?
Many thin, liner socks are polypro or something similar; very slippery.
I have used just thin liners for years and loved them, I have found that unless you are expecting very cold temps, (zero or so), they are plenty warm. I would have a hard time spraying silicone spray in my boots, doesn't sound too good for them.
My popinlaw-to-be got the same silicone based spray advice from one of the most respected boot fitters in the industry.
post #14 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kneale Brownson View Post
.

Zog, in addition to being fond of the particular socks I wear, I have what my wife calls a lifetime supply. I've gotten five years so far (and at least a couple more to come) out of the first dozen pairs and I have two more dozen in reserve.

Dude, you can get a pair of liner socks for about $7. Sounds like a cheap fix.
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