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Telluride skis

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 
Hey everyone
Im heading to telluride from December to February at the end of this year and I want to get a ski for everything this resort has to offer, from the powder at the new revelation lift and the steep double black bump runs.
Im thinking something around the high 80's to low 90's waist.
Any recommendations would be great.
I'm 6'1 and weigh 185
Cheers
post #2 of 12

my .02

I have skied Telluride a few times and love it there. No lines and a great variety of terrain. From what I can tell I am real similar to you. I like to ski the whole mountain from the pow to the bumps and everything in between. I love the PE, its 85 in the waist and handles bumps real well. Its plenty of loft for me in the powder too. I am slightly taller than you weigh about 10lbs less. You also wont break the bank buying a pair. Its my go to 1 ski quiver and I have no complaints about it at all.
post #3 of 12
I think Wagners are required there!

http://www.wagnerskis.com/
post #4 of 12
I have been skiing Telluride for over 30 years and have always struggled on what ski to use there. Almost all of the good skiing is either vey high speed cruising on hardpack runs or steep tight bumps. Even if it dumps a foot you are still skiing the bumps underneath. Gold Hill tends to get hammered by the wind and sun, and unless you go deep in the trees most of the tree skiing near the runs is steep and bumped. Half the runs off lift 6 and the bottom of the mountain on both sides also have high sun exposure. The bottom line is you need a ski that you can comfortably ski in the bumps all day on semi-hard snow.

That's not to say that they don't have some good quality snow. The Lift 9 runs, half of the Lift 6 runs, and selected areas off Gold Hill stay pretty shady and the snow quality is good even if it hasn't snowed for a while, but you will ski more bumps in a week at T-ride than you will in half a season at Alta or Snowbird. My latest choice is a pair of Atomic M:EXs with a 84mm waist, a medium even flex, and the bindings set 1 cm forward. They handle the Spiral Stairs bumps in any snow condition but will rail the groomed on the bottom half.

The trend is definitely wider, even at Telluride, and there are plenty of locals on Mantras or the like, but for everyday skiing I personally would not go as fat as a 90mm waist. Unless you are a very strong zipper line bump skier I reccomend going with a mellower flexing ski that will allow you to ski slowly in the bumps when needed without forcing your skis around. Anything with a stiff tail will be more work than necessay and makes for a long day, but then the locals usually don't come out until noon anyway. An even flex will work for crud, powder and the bumps.

You also want to avoid very stiff boots. The local joke here is that if you want to find out if your boots fit go ski Telluride, because you'll be in every freaking corner of them by the end of the day. Any shin bang will be punishing.

Telluride is a magical place on many levels, and I'm sure you'll have a fantastic winter. It's big gravity skiing at it's finest.
post #5 of 12
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the help so far.
Originally i was going to do my 3 months in aspen but decided Telluride was a better place to be. I was thinking the Volkl Bridge which has a 92mm waist for the pow and an aggressive sidecut for the groomers but now I'm not too sure. Maybe something in the 80mm waist would be better like the head monster 82/88 for the skiing at T-ride. I would prefer to have a twintip ski but I'm open to anything because you don't go to T-ride to ski park.
post #6 of 12
Actually, they have a good park at T-ride with a big half-pipe. I believe the Bridge is a nice all-around ski, and there are certainly locals skiing on 90+ skis. I don't know if you've ever skied there, but they don't have wide open bowls, and most of the skiing is steep, so the bumps get big and without a huge annual snowfall to fill them in they stay that way. You are certainly big enough to push a beefy ski around, you just need to decide if you want to do it all the time. Telluride is a great area, but it is not like much of anything else in Colorado because of the general narrowness of the runs and consistent steepness of the terrain. It gets lots of high altitude sun, so when it doesn't snow alot of the mountain gets cooked.

I guarantee that if you ski there for a season you will be in better ski shape than you've ever been because, unless you stick to the groomers, you will be working your skis in the bumps or steeps all the time. So my recommedation is to pick a ski that isn't going to give you a fight. Telluride teaches you to be smooth because there is so much gravity you can't win a fight. Don't be fooled by the pictures of Revelation Bowl, they were taken this year. Once they open the lift in there it'll be bumps up to your knees, just like the rest of the mountain.
post #7 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by mudfoot View Post
Actually, they have a good park at T-ride with a big half-pipe. I believe the Bridge is a nice all-around ski, and there are certainly locals skiing on 90+ skis. I don't know if you've ever skied there, but they don't have wide open bowls, and most of the skiing is steep, so the bumps get big and without a huge annual snowfall to fill them in they stay that way. You are certainly big enough to push a beefy ski around, you just need to decide if you want to do it all the time. Telluride is a great area, but it is not like much of anything else in Colorado because of the general narrowness of the runs and consistent steepness of the terrain. It gets lots of high altitude sun, so when it doesn't snow alot of the mountain gets cooked.

I guarantee that if you ski there for a season you will be in better ski shape than you've ever been because, unless you stick to the groomers, you will be working your skis in the bumps or steeps all the time. So my recommedation is to pick a ski that isn't going to give you a fight. Telluride teaches you to be smooth because there is so much gravity you can't win a fight. Don't be fooled by the pictures of Revelation Bowl, they were taken this year. Once they open the lift in there it'll be bumps up to your knees, just like the rest of the mountain.
^^^^ What HE said.... ^^^^
post #8 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by mudfoot View Post
Don't be fooled by the pictures of Revelation Bowl, they were taken this year. Once they open the lift in there it'll be bumps up to your knees, just like the rest of the mountain.
Can't wait to go back to T-ride!

Just my two cents since the Volkl Bridge was mentioned. I ski mostly at Taos which I think has similar characteristics as Telluride: Steep slopes with big moguls, wind buffed snow, tight trees with bumps, the powder doesn't last long, and we don't have as many powder days as Utah does.

Earlier this year I was looking for an "all-mountain" ski for Taos and demoed quite a few pairs, all of them on the upper 80s - lower 90mm range. The Volkl Bridge, the Atomic Snoop Daddy, and the Dynastar Mythic Rider made it to the top of my list. Both the Bridge and the snoop daddy felt really nimble and soft flexing in the bumps but I ended up getting the Mythics because even though they were a little heavier than the others they were really easy to ski, did really good on bumps, and most importantly handled better the wind buff and chalky snow that you can find on the top of the mountain. I'd recommend any of the three in a heartbeat, but the Mythics happened to be my personal choice.
post #9 of 12
When I was there I rented some stockli laser cross, and the stormrider XL, along with the Head monster 88's..I liked them all, and enjoyed them, but when I put my mythics back on, it was like putting on some buddies..Next time I would just use the Mythics

Lee
post #10 of 12
Thread Starter 
Thanks again for the help
I'm also wondering about whether I should buy the skis here in Australia or if there are any good ski shops in Telluride that sell Head, Volkl and such that i would be able to demo them before I buy?
post #11 of 12
There are plenty of shops, and they are in Telluride ,or Mountain Village. I happened to go to Bootdoctors, they were very helpful to me.. and they had every main brand..Volkl, Atomic, Stockli, Dynastar, Rossi, Armada, Head, I think K2, etc..I would say with the number of rentals around Telluride, you would have no problem finding what you need on the Hill
post #12 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by adza_1990 View Post
Thanks again for the help
I'm also wondering about whether I should buy the skis here in Australia or if there are any good ski shops in Telluride that sell Head, Volkl and such that i would be able to demo them before I buy?
Unless you can get a very special deal down under, I would suggest buying in the US as this will save having to take on the plane and will likely be cheaper...I have never been to t-ride and don't know what the prices are like in the local shops, but am under the impression that prices are higher for skis in Oz than the US...if the t-ride shops don't offer any decent deals, you could always order from one of the epic supporters and have them ship to you in t-ride (or look around for other online bargains).
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