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Inline skaters who also ski - Page 5

Poll Results: How do you make most of your inline skate turns?

This is a multiple choice poll
  • 1% of voters (1)
    A-frame. I generally enter turns very slowly.
  • 0% of voters (0)
    I brake before turns and stride through in the new direction
  • 15% of voters (8)
    Some form of parallel turn. Both feet on ground. Very hard to lift inside foot during turn.
  • 23% of voters (12)
    Some form of parallel turn. No problem at all to lift inside foot.
  • 45% of voters (23)
    Crossover
  • 15% of voters (8)
    Lunge turn (extra wide parallel turn with weight transfer to outside edge of inside foot)
51 Total Votes  
post #121 of 143

JC-ski my sugestion if you want roller skis, get real roller skis (nowadays there's 100 different brands and models) not this thing. Normal roller skis have no brakes and really act like xc skis, and you can basically do everything you do on xc skis. Skis on the other side is I guess more oriented on people who never did xc skiing, and don't feel comfortable on skis, so they have brakes, and "binding" which doesn't need xc ski boots to clip on, but normal shoes. Brakes operate so, that when you stand up, it automatically pushes brake on back wheel. This means you need to lean forward all the time if you don't want brake to engage. And unfortunately that's position in which you can't ski. Also "binding" is everything but great, so in my opinion, they are certainly not worth getting it. If you want to go xc skiing in summer get real roller skis (Marwe, One Way, Fischer, Briko/Maplus, Jenex, Start, Skigo, Skiskett...).

post #122 of 143

Although I have done a bit and like XC skiing I'm not really interested in roller skiing. I am however intrigued by inline skate designs that might allow for better riding on really rough pavement, and maybe even light off road use - smoothish grass, fire roads, hard sand. etc. Haven't pulled the trigger on anything yet, but enjoy looking at what's out there.

 

I'm better than I used to be but am still an intermediate inline skater. Get out 2-3 times a week for an hour skate that includes some carving going down and sustained climbing up - not just skating on flat bike paths. Every time out I spend a fair amount of time specifically on one foot - see how far I can glide, make up impromptu "slalom courses" with leaves or spots on the road and practice one-footed turning - feel like that in particular has been good for my skiing.

 

Really love the sensations I get skating, and also appreciate the fitness benefit - it's all good as far as I'm concerned.

 

 

Originally Posted by jc-ski View Post
 

Anyone ever seen/been on these? Look a bit cumbersome, but interesting...

 

 

http://skike.com

post #123 of 143

Don't know if this guy skis, but wouldn't be surprised. Regardless, prepare to be impressed...

 

post #124 of 143
Quote:
Originally Posted by jc-ski View Post
 

 Regardless, prepare to be impressed...

 

 

 

BTW A2A was today. 

post #125 of 143

Beyond me at this point, but it does look fun...

 

 

Have you ever done it?

post #126 of 143
Quote:
Originally Posted by jc-ski View Post
 

 

Have you ever done it?

 

I have.     Oddly enough my skiing afterwards was really remarkably *bad*. 

post #127 of 143

Curious, how long after the A2A did you get out to ski? And what do you think caused the "bad" skiing? Arm movements? Posture? ???

 

Back in the late 90's I made that Atlanta-Athens run ( in a car! ;-) several times. I vaguely remember it then as pretty rural/quiet and mostly flat. From a skating perspective are there significant uphill/downhill stretches? Do they mark bad sections of road somehow, or is it completely up to the racer to suss out what's coming up?

 

  http://www.a2a.net

 

In any event that's a helluva long skate! And look who won the 2015 race...

 

  http://www.a2a.net/15result/RESOV87.TXT

 

That Eddy is amazing - still going strong all these years later!

 

 

 

And guess just as skis have gotten fatter over the years so have skate wheels!    ;-)


Edited by jc-ski - 10/12/15 at 9:57am
post #128 of 143
Quote:
Originally Posted by jc-ski View Post
 

Curious, how long after the A2A did you get out to ski?

 

Thanksgiving-abouts.    I had just completely utterly messed up my 'feel' for the skis and took forever to get myself back into active management of fore/aft pressure.    Like I didn't get it back until about Feb.     Trashed my Tahoe trip, that did. 
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by jc-ski View Post

 From a skating perspective are there significant uphill/downhill stretches? 

 

There are what you'd call 'rolling' hills at the start - if you get in the right-for-you paceline at the start then you won't even notice the hills because the speed management is so good.  In that right paceline, for the first hour and a half nothing can touch you, just don't get dropped.  Don't even think about rest stops, stay with the paceline.   It will be painful like nothing else but you will fly like Superman, faster by a wide margin than you thought. 

  If you get in a too-slow paceline or get dropped you're hosed and will suffer for the first two-two and a half hours.    Your best bet is to keep steady and pick up singletons or pairs past the two-hour mark.

There is a weird metabolic thing that happens at ~45 mins (for the relatively not well trained) to 90 minutes (for the better trained) - no matter what you do, no matter how you eat or drink you will have an energy hole where you feel weak as a kitten.     This is when all the spontaneous pacelines that formed coming onto the first hill out of Athens tend to scatter, and you can pick up buddies.    

 

At about 4 hours the 10K, the 30min + 1lap specialists and the really buff, really cut weightlifty types tend to get sewing machine leg and speed wobbles.   Don't take them into your paceline, they will break it, especially when you get  to the super long downhill here.   The last thing you need is someone braking in front of you and then unable to catch onto the back when the gradient reverses and you climb again.
 

Watch out for the train tracks - speed suits get shredded on this stretch. 

Quote:

Originally Posted by jc-ski View Post

 Do they mark bad sections of road somehow, or is it completely up to the racer to suss out what's coming up?

 

 

Nope, up to you - you pre-run the finish on Friday and the start on Saturday so that helps. 

post #129 of 143
Quote:
Originally Posted by cantunamunch View Post

 

Thanksgiving-abouts.    I had just completely utterly messed up my 'feel' for the skis and took forever to get myself back into active management of fore/aft pressure.    Like I didn't get it back until about Feb.     Trashed my Tahoe trip, that did.

 

Hmm, too much of a good thing, apparently.   ;-)

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by cantunamunch View Post

 

Watch out for the train tracks - speed suits get shredded on this stretch.

 

Yikes! Do you just get stable, maybe scissor, and roll right over, or actually try to jump the tracks?

post #130 of 143
Quote:
Originally Posted by jc-ski View Post
 

Yikes! Do you just get stable, maybe scissor, and roll right over, or actually try to jump the tracks?

 

Jump/hurdle.   If you're stable and someone trips in front of you you're eating pavement.

post #131 of 143
Quote:
Originally Posted by jc-ski View Post
 

Curious, how long after the A2A did you get out to ski? And what do you think caused the "bad" skiing? Arm movements? Posture? ???

 

And guess just as skis have gotten fatter over the years so have skate wheels!    ;-)

 My guess, probably this  -  http://blading.at.webry.info/201010/article_6.html

...and try explaining it to your ski boot fitter.

 

 Yep, you wont see many people on those old 5 x 80mm wheel/frame set ups. They are now on 4 x    110mm and the latest 3 x 125mm wheel/frame setups.

...and you thought Tyrolia Adrenalins, Marker Dukes and KneeBinding have high deck heights, go rolling around on these things in stiff hard as rock booties that come up to mid or top of ankle bone. Your podiatrist and orthopedist is gonna love you.

post #132 of 143
Quote:
Originally Posted by neonorchid View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by jc-ski View Post
 

Curious, how long after the A2A did you get out to ski? And what do you think caused the "bad" skiing? Arm movements? Posture? ???

 

And guess just as skis have gotten fatter over the years so have skate wheels!    ;-)

 My guess, probably this  -  http://blading.at.webry.info/201010/article_6.html

...and try explaining it to your ski boot fitter.

 

:D I'm in rec boots for 3 seasons now and the extra ankle on the navicular is finally fading. 

post #133 of 143
Quote:
Originally Posted by cantunamunch View Post
 

 

:D I'm in rec boots for 3 seasons now and the extra ankle on the navicular is finally fading. 


Me too, about a year since I've been in race skates. Went back to a rec/marathon skate. The Mütter Museum is no longer interested in my ankles, lol. 

post #134 of 143

Did you guys try to mold them? I'm for few years in Core/Powerslide Icon boots (actually second pair already), and though they are very uncomfortable on beginning, and perfect to get all these problems, they are just fine once you mold them (easy to do it at home in kitchen stove :) ). Personally I have much more issues with ski race boots then with skates, as skates are so much easier to mold fitting your foot perfectly.

post #135 of 143
Quote:
Originally Posted by primoz View Post
 

Did you guys try to mold them? I'm for few years in Core/Powerslide Icon boots (actually second pair already), and though they are very uncomfortable on beginning, and perfect to get all these problems, they are just fine once you mold them (easy to do it at home in kitchen stove :) ). Personally I have much more issues with ski race boots then with skates, as skates are so much easier to mold fitting your foot perfectly.


Oh don't get me started!

 

Consider yourself among the lucky few who can be in a off the shelf boot, or for that matter even customs.

And yes I personally know a few who still had trouble even with high end custom boots. Some who had the castings done by the boot maker himself, a renowned man who outfits Olympic athletes!

 

Btw, I tried the Core Icon too. Very easy to mold to my forefoot shape without the use of boot fitter tools, but still too wide around the ankle to work.

 

Fwiw, I've both purchased and fabricated my own "boot fitter" tools! Beat the F' out of several expensive door stops!

 

 

If you race, chances are you know the people whom I spend less and less time skating with these days.

Oh and one guy from our area, Tom Detwiler, gave up skating for bikes, came back in 2011 and entered NYC marathon, placed in the top 10 so did A2A and crushed it! Beat Eddy and the rest of them by more then 5minutes that year! http://speedskateworld.com/2011/october-9th-2011-athens-to-atlanta-tom-detwiler-marcy-turek-victorious/


Edited by neonorchid - 10/13/15 at 8:03am
post #136 of 143

Geee I didn't thought it's that bad. Even though I don't consider my feet as really standard ones, I'm starting to think I'm actually pretty lucky one now :) These skates I have now (Core Icon), were sort of ok straight from shelf, but basically just for short (somewhere up to 30km) sessions. For anything longer it was painful, and I could see whole bunch of problems starting to develop, if I would keep skating like that. But once I molded them, they feel perfect. So I guess I'm lucky when it comes to this :)

PS: I don't race. When I was still racing in xc skiing, I always thought how cool speed skating is, but here (Slovenia) I had nowhere to try that. Now, when inline speed skates are relatively cheap (if 600eur boot can be called cheap, but luckily you can get year old model for 1/3 of price :) ), I can finally do this what I have always considered as really cool sport. Well it's not on ice, but it's close enough, and it's super fun sport to add to mtb and running during summer :) I'm not really slowest one, but considering what guys like Swings brothers & Co. are doing, I'm dead slow with my 30-35km/h avg :)

post #137 of 143

One more thing Neonorchid, as you probably have whole bunch of experiences with this :) There's one problem I somehow can't get rid of it... blister on heel of right foot (sort of outside part of heel). I'm solving this now with tape under sock and neopren footies over sock. With left foot this works fine, with right, it works ok for shorter sessions, but once I'm out for some 2h and if I go hard(er) (probably have something to do with technique too) I almost always ended with peeled heel. Any suggestion how to get rid of this, or is this something perfectly normal (based on photos from your link I guess it's all fine :D )

post #138 of 143
Quote:
Originally Posted by primoz View Post
 

neopren footies over sock

 

 :eek  If you can do that, your boots are looser than I ever let mine get.    If they got loose enough to need a 2mm neoprene bootie, it was time to send them back to Bont for new leather.  

 

BTW skaters who put their frames very far to the inside (toed in) get this problem real bad.   So do skaters who rush edge engagement using the ankle.   Ofc, when for example climbing you may not have a choice.
 

post #139 of 143

I kind of thought it could be technique, as if I keep an eye on this and do it properly with double push and everything, it's much much better, but once when I get tired and still push hard, I can feel blisters starting to form in very short time. I was trained to xc ski properly and efficiently, but never had any training for speed skating, so it's what I learned from videos and internet by myself, which means my technique probably suck :)

It could be my boots are loose. They are long enough (sort of race ski boots style, which means basically a bit too short), and they sort of feel tight, with 2mm footies they press a bit, but it's still better then blister, as they don't really press that bad. But it can easily be that they are (too) loose. There's still not all that much of these things around here, so it's basically impossible to try these sort of boots, so I went with Core Icon few years back, as I had some lower end Powerslide speed skates before, and they sort of fit, so I played safe and stayed with same fit. It could be that some Bont, Luigino... would fit better but there's simply no chance to try.

post #140 of 143

That's pretty common. It actually sounds like the core icons are working for you.

 

Powerslide came out with a updated XXX boot this year that incorporates a cut out feature to the shell which is supposed to prevent such blisters. Seems like a good idea? I haven't heard any feedback. Either way it's good to see innovation in such a small niche market -

http://www.powerslide.com/en/products/inline-skates/powerslide-triple-x-racing-inline-skates

 

At any rate, things to help remedy the blister problem - technique, sock (fabric and fit), ezefit neoprene booties (I prefer the thin weight), put a thick viscous silicone on the problem area of your foot.

 

I'm no longer in speed skates because of a injury, peroneal tendinosis. If I were to go back to a speed skate, it's low cuff would constantly hit the problem area during the push cycle with leg extended outward at around 3 - 4 o'clock. A non issue with "marathon" skates. Frustrating because a "marathon" skate just doesn't perform like a speed skate.

post #141 of 143

Add the Mariani Dogma ID to your list -

http://www.stouwdam.nl/skeelers--skates/skeelerschoenen/mariani-dogma-id/90/4009/

 

Also, if you try a Bont, be sure you are not getting old stock. They recently changed little things such as padding hardness and lowered the shell lip in the forefoot.

post #142 of 143

Wow!


 

Get her on some ballet skis!   ;-)

post #143 of 143
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