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For those who have torn a ligament

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 
I am curious to know:

What did you do wrong, if anything, at your time of injury?

What was your DIN?

Is that DIN setting the one recommended for you by the charts?

What bindings were you using (year/make/model)?

Was it the end of the day (you were tired)?

Are there any reasons that you might be more susceptible to this type of injury (you are always tearing and rupturing things, or were on a medication that may have contributed)?

How would you describe the incident (slow twist, fast explosive, collision, etc.)?
post #2 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richie-Rich View Post
I am curious to know:

What did you do wrong, if anything, at your time of injury?
What kind of thing would fall into this category?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Richie-Rich View Post
What was your DIN?
6

Quote:
Originally Posted by Richie-Rich View Post
Is that DIN setting the one recommended for you by the charts?
Yep.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Richie-Rich View Post
What bindings were you using (year/make/model)?
Fischer v9 railflex 2007

Quote:
Originally Posted by Richie-Rich View Post
Was it the end of the day (you were tired)?
No.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Richie-Rich View Post
Are there any reasons that you might be more susceptible to this type of injury (you are always tearing and rupturing things, or were on a medication that may have contributed)?
No.
post #3 of 12
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by num View Post
What kind of thing would fall into this category?


Way in the back seat would be one thing, speeding in an unfamiliar area, hucking a jump without first inspecting or with no experience, going faster than you are comfortable with, or anything else that stood out in your mind afterwards and made you say, "I should not have done that".
post #4 of 12
I tore my ACL during Summer of 2005 (nearly exactly 3 years ago this month), but it was while playing soccer, and not skiing.

I generally ski with my bindings above the recommended DIN setting, and have never injured my knee skiing.


(this is not an endorsement of cranking your bindings, but just an extra data point for Richie's little survey here).
post #5 of 12
we, routinely, ask all our conscious (sp?) patients, "what could you have done to avoid this---whatever injury they had---"
post #6 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richie-Rich View Post
I am curious to know:

What did you do wrong, if anything, at your time of injury?
caught a toe side edge!

What was your DIN?
N/A Snowboard

Is that DIN setting the one recommended for you by the charts?
not sure how to answer that???

What bindings were you using (year/make/model)?
Burton Freestyle, same years as injury---whenever that was!

Was it the end of the day (you were tired)?

no--actually early in the evening.

Are there any reasons that you might be more susceptible to this type of injury (you are always tearing and rupturing things, or were on a medication that may have contributed)?

How would you describe the incident (slow twist, fast explosive, collision, etc.)?
toe side body slam. fast enough, concussion and 2nd degree seperated AC joint (ie: ligament stretch---not tear---)
post #7 of 12
R-R, I tore my ACL about 8 years ago when skiing Ragged Mtn, New Hampshire. Nothing spectacular about the crash ... I high-sided the wrong way on an off camber turn and my leg sorta whipped over my head. I felt/heard the tear when it happened as it sounded like someone cracking all their knuckles at the same time. It hurt like hell for about 1-2 minutes, and then I clicked back in and cruised on down to the bottom.

My mistake was 2 things: 1) Skiing when overly tired 2) Skiing on poor quality, rented equipment. This was "the last run of the day" - the last day of the trip and the end of the spring skiing season. I pushed too hard when instead I should have sat it out in the lodge. As to the "rented equipment", I promptly went and bought new gear before the new season rolled around.

Surgery was in May, released from the Doc in October, back on the slopes again in January:
post #8 of 12
Thread Starter 
The 1-2 punch, that'll do it.
post #9 of 12
Last run of the night (after beer league racing), although I wasn't tired I was thinking about hitting the bar for a beer and some food. I came into the base area carrying a little too much speed and some snow boarders came around a corner. I went left and they went right except for one who also went left. We collided and I wrapped my knee around him or his board (not sure which). Basically a forward twisting fall with a significant impact. Ripped my ACL off, tore my meniscus a little and sprained my MCL in addition to a lot of bone bruising. Lots of pain right off, but I didn't hear or feel a "pop". Apologized to the snowboarder (who was fine) and scooted off to the ski check and the bar. Bindings were set to 9 which is about +1 over the manual for me, but the collision did the damage and not any release issues. I'm about 11 weeks post surgery and on schedule to be back on the slopes this winter.
post #10 of 12
Thread Starter 
Wow, I had a similar collision, luckily, at least for me, that my mass and speed overcame the impact and I suffered no harm the noob who carelessly got in my way fell pretty hard; patrol was there and didnt stop me as I looked back so I kept going...cursing under my breath, could have snapped me in half.
post #11 of 12
I am curious to know:

What did you do wrong, if anything, at your time of injury?

Stopped skiing and started falling. I believe my front right tip caught a snow runnel as I started a left turn. Ski went up and I fell back;no biggy. On a groomer I probaly would have recovered but when it's real steep, the ground behind you is closer than you think. The pitch was about 50-55 deg so as soon as I leaned back, my back hit the snow, bothy skis were in the air. I spun around on my back and started heading down hill head first; fast. Skis were both in the air and knees were on my chest. I started picking up speed and put my hands out to each side clawing at the spring snow to self arrest. I'm guessing that this caused my left ski tail to touch the snow and my left ski tip spun to the right (at warp speed) and spun me around and I finally came to a stop.

When I stopped I knew my left knee was toast but I still had to get down. When I got to my feet, it felt OK so I tried skiing the rest of the way down. It was OK until I started approaching a snow runnel on the left side and so I had to turn right. As soon as my weight went to my left leg I went down hard and never felt pain like that. I believe I tore my acl on the first fall and sprained my mcl on the second. I was also given the opportunity to fall and re-injure my knee two more times on my hike out.

In retrospect, I might have been able to ride it out on my back but I couldn't see where I was going and I knew there was a boulder somewhere at the bottom. It ended up I wouldn't have come close to it but I couldn't remember where it was and I only had a second or two to decide.

I've also accepted that had I not torn my acl, I could have broken my neck if it turned into a rag doll fall. This is what i was dealt and I'm happy with the outcome.

What was your DIN?

7. Which is the top end of my range.

Is that DIN setting the one recommended for you by the charts?

5 for my size and age and then up one or two for experience. It probably should have been on 6 but if a ski comes off at Tuckerman's Ravine, you do a rag doll fall to the bottom. I tore my acl and mcl but another guy fell 30 minutes earlier, both skis came off and he broke his pelvis.

It hurt but I was able to walk (limp with a splint) out. He left in an ambulance. His fall had nothing to do with binding settings, just bad luck. He's a teledude I believe.

My skis never came off.

What bindings were you using (year/make/model)?

2007 (this was there first season '08), Atomic neox, came with the Metron b5's.

Was it the end of the day (you were tired)?

It wasn't originally but a torn ACl and sprained MCL makes it that way. I was exhausted. I just spent the better part of the morning skinning and hiking up Mt. Washington in NH. I wanted to take a longer break before our run but my partner was restless to ski the Ravine so I pushed on.

Are there any reasons that you might be more susceptible to this type of injury (you are always tearing and rupturing things, or were on a medication that may have contributed)?

No.

How would you describe the incident (slow twist, fast explosive, collision, etc.)?[/quote]

Explosive twist.
post #12 of 12
I was skiing a short section of a bump run quite slowly on March 2nd. I lost my balance a little and I stopped, facing uphill, with my skis spread out, tips wide out, tails closer together. I stayed in my bindings, set at DIN 7, chart setting is 6 1/2. I was skiing on X-Wing Blast skis with the Salomon bindings.

Just as I stopped, I felt a moderate pain on the inside or medial part of my right knee. I stood on the hill for a couple of minutes trying to assess if I had any real injury. It felt like I had stretched a ligament, but my knee felt stable, so I figured that I had not completely torn a ligament, so I continued skiing, but stayed on the groomers.

Later at night, I had some pain with movement and swelling in my knee so I iced it regularly for about a day and a half, and then warmed it with a heating pad regularly for several more days. My own assessment was that I had slightly strained my MCL. I stayed off skis for two weeks, but I did play doubles tennis during that time, but avoided fast accelerations or directional changes.

When I started back skiing, I stayed on groomers for a couple of days to see how my knee felt, and then gradually was drawn back into the bumps like a magnet, although I was more cautious for about the next dozen days' skiing spread out over five weeks.

I went to my doctor when I returned to Toronto after the ski season, and he confirmed that I did in fact slightly strain my MCL. My understanding is that a strain does involve some slight tearing of the ligament fibres, but that the ligament can heal itself, although this healing happens at a slower rate because of the limited blood supply for that tissue.

He just advised me to listen to my body to assess my level of recovery and how hard to play tennis. I gradually improved and could push myself a little harder and by about 4 months later in July, I felt I had recovered about 80-90%.

I feel lucky that I did not do any more damage. I have seen several ACL injuries which occurred at a very slow speed while losing balance. My own theory is that ski bindings work better with some speed, and tend to not release as consistently under some situations of little movement.
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