New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

A good laugh

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 
I have been trying to figure out what type of skis I should buy to get into some masters racing here in Summit, CO when I came across the following (bold underline added):

Types of Racing Skis

As if distinguishing between the different types of skis was not confusing enough, determining the best type of racing ski for your event is even more of a challenge. Here are some basic guidelines for different types of racing skis:

Slalom Skis
Slalom ski racers are famous for their remarkable precision at short radius turns. For this reason, they require skis that have superb edge to edge grip, which accounts for their highly pronounced sidecut. Most slalom skis are quite short. However, be sure to check the FIS updated guidelines.

Giant Slalom Skis
Giant Slalom skis have significantly less sidecut than slalom skis. These longer skis have less sidecut than their slalom counterparts, which gives them extra flotation in deep powder.

http://skiing.lifetips.com/cat/65819...ing-equipment/

I guess this means that the GS skis I get will overlap with my fatties:
post #2 of 11
That is funny, perhaps this was added after the WC races in Beaver Creek last December? If you read all of the "definitions" you will note they were written by someone with zero ski knowledge.
post #3 of 11
Heh, I've heard people say that their slalom skis work great in powder because of the big tips.
post #4 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by MAGGOT View Post
Heh, I've heard people say that their slalom skis work great in powder because of the big tips.
Mine *do*. Honest.

Don't yours?



That does remind me of a day last winter when I was too lazy to change from my 165cm real-deal Head iSL RD's (after a morning of racing) when I joined some friends for skiing about 15" of powder/crud in the afternoon. Those skis are not what you would call "forgiving" and it was definitely not a relaxing afternoon. Those big tips seek the bottom with a vengeance.
post #5 of 11
Quote:
The Lycra one-piece ski suits that are worn by ski racers are not worn to show off their great bodies. These items are designed for warmth
Yeah, those downhill suits really are toasty warm :

Also, bonus points for anyone who can find me pictures of racers wearing "body armor products such as knee pads" or anyone who can get me some "Extreme race gear" for those "Big Mountain extreme competitions [that] require a ski that gives them the best of everything." If I'd known I could just get some extreme race skis that will be the best at everything, I never would have bothered with this whole "quiver" nonsense.

It also wins for understatement of the year when describing big mountain events: "The relatively ungroomed courses"
post #6 of 11
And when you see a person in an extra long jacket .... be sure to show some due respect cause' that's the teams coach.

:
post #7 of 11
Well I'd take a long GS ski over a short SL in powder just about anyday. Of course, I'd take a 90+ waist ski over them both assuming the legnth was similar. Last time I skied really good powder there weren't makine/selling 100 + waist skis so I definately went with a GS cause my SLs were only 190 cm:
post #8 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by MEfree30 View Post
Giant Slalom Skis
Giant Slalom skis have significantly less sidecut than slalom skis. These longer skis have less sidecut than their slalom counterparts, which gives them extra flotation in deep powder.

http://skiing.lifetips.com/cat/65819...ing-equipment/

I guess this means that the GS skis I get will overlap with my fatties:
Probably the sentence dates from the "pre-fat" era far, far away in the past, say mid '80 ?
When the choice was between SL and GS skis only, the sentence might have had some wheight...even if, between a 204 cm SL and a 205 cm GS ski in pow...Not much of a difference.
post #9 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by CanuckInstructor View Post
Yeah, those downhill suits really are toasty warm :

Also, bonus points for anyone who can find me pictures of racers wearing "body armor products such as knee pads" or anyone who can get me some "Extreme race gear" for those "Big Mountain extreme competitions [that] require a ski that gives them the best of everything." If I'd known I could just get some extreme race skis that will be the best at everything, I never would have bothered with this whole "quiver" nonsense.

It also wins for understatement of the year when describing big mountain events: "The relatively ungroomed courses"
I saw that! Do 75' footers count as relative here? Calling Tyrone or Bush, is this a groomer to you or just broken? That entire paragraph is bizarre.
post #10 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Peters View Post
Mine *do*. Honest.

Don't yours?



That does remind me of a day last winter when I was too lazy to change from my 165cm real-deal Head iSL RD's (after a morning of racing) when I joined some friends for skiing about 15" of powder/crud in the afternoon. Those skis are not what you would call "forgiving" and it was definitely not a relaxing afternoon. Those big tips seek the bottom with a vengeance.
Same skis as you Bob...it was torture (crud on Hunter, 11" that weekend), ended up renting some pieces of junk to get through that day of skiing.
post #11 of 11

Racing Suits

In the definition for Racing Suits:

"These items are designed for warmth..."

...inside the chalet, which is why everyone peels their tops down as soon as they come in .
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: General Skiing Discussion