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Feeler: Workstands

post #1 of 27
Thread Starter 
I've decided that I need some sort of a rack/stand to store my bike on in my apartment. At the same time I figured that I am eventually going to want a workstand, so why not merge the 2 into one?

So I'll be designing/building a workstand. I'd like to gauge possible interest in selling a few of these, as the cost of materials goes down if I buy in full lengths. Here are my plans so far:
  • Steel body, adjustable height
  • folding legs
  • Pivoting, padded clamp w/ one-handed operation (think vice-grip-
  • Possible tool rest/parts tray
I've got a fair bit of fab experience (see elsewhere here for the skis I built) and will have my BS in engineering in less then a year.

I'll try to get a 3d model of what I am planning posted later today, depends on how busy work is. Eight now I am thinking $50-$75 each, probably closer to $50. I'm not going to try and make a killing here, just cover my costs so I can build a few stands.

PM me or post ?s here.

-Kyle
post #2 of 27
FWIW, the Sette wall mount workstand and the bench mounted option caught my eye while looking storage and transport ideas. Might be an approach combined with a foldable base. There are a bunch of stands at PricePoint. I'm considering getting rid of my foldable stand and setting up a wall or bench mount stand.

And then there are these stands currently on sale for $60.
post #3 of 27
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alpinord View Post
FWIW, the Sette wall mount workstand and the bench mounted option caught my eye while looking storage and transport ideas. Might be an approach combined with a foldable base. There are a bunch of stands at PricePoint.
Thanks Terry, you reminded me of something.

I can also make just a clamp to mount to a table/wall. My rotating mechanism will be similar to the one shown above. I just feel like I am capable of making something of the same, if not better, quality for less $$.

I liked the look of those too, but I live in an apartment and don't want to try and hit a stud to hang one of those.
post #4 of 27
You can generate a fairly sturdy floor to ceiling 'post' by using an adjustable base on a 2x4 or steel pole in lieu of a wall mount.

Hitting a stud is easy, it's the patching that'll get ya. You could also span a pair of studs with a board to avoid marring the drywall and if diagonal and with t-track(s), slotted or with multiple holes, you have a simple and adjustable option with minimal patching.

Designing and fabricating your own will be more interesting and fun though. You have access to a full metal fab shop? :
post #5 of 27
Thread Starter 
My last apartment had really screwy studs due to their method of soundproofing. We cracked a sheet of drywall by the two of us standing in the same spot (I was carrying someone down the hall ). I know how to use a knife and joint compound, but I'm not messing with these walls. Plus I want something nice enough that I can leave out with out the GF saying anything...

Plus it needs to match the bike.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Alpinord View Post
Fabricating your own will be more interesting and fun though. You have access to a full metal fab shop? :
Full machine shop on campus w/ vertical milling machines and lathes plus everything else I should need. CNCs are also available but overkill for this project, I do wish we had a waterjet though.

Plus I am working at a tooling manufacturing company right now importing/updating there prints. I get to play with CAD all day...:
post #6 of 27
Sounds like a fun design/fab project.

(If you get it modeled, if you want, please send the 3d file to check out and so I can test out importing it in to a 2009 CAD software package I'm beta testing with new 3d capabilities and power to help find bugs. )
post #7 of 27
Thread Starter 
What package are you testing? I might be able to save it in more of a friendly format...

15 minute break @ 10am and then an hour around noon, should be cake to get this into a model.
post #8 of 27
VectorWorks Designer of which Machine Design is one component.

Any or all of these formats can be imported:

~DWG
~3DS
~IGES
~SAT
~PARASOLID X_T

& Sketch-Up

I keep thinking I'm going to model one of my bikes someday.....and stick Morfdude on it.

Thanks,
Terry
post #9 of 27
Thread Starter 
Well, I was a little sick yesterday/last night so I didn't finish the design as planned. Here is the basics so far:




I'll do some more today, i.e. adjustable height, bike clamp maybe even the tool tray.


Alpinord, I can send you what I have so far or wait, but I need an e-mail address (I probably have it at home, I'm at work now).
post #10 of 27
I'm sure you realize there is a substantial moment force where the legs and vertical support meet which needs to be counteracted. Are those extrudes or shells for the tubes and what application are you using?

Whenever you get something together and convenient is fine. It's just an excuse to test a 3rd party 3d source file. There's an email address on my home design site.

Not sure how you transport your bike, but receiver hitch racks could be used in a floor mounted support for both storage and as a stand. I think that that would be the best overall solution. For those with a garage, simply back in the car and use the rack. When camping or at a trailhead it also works great.
post #11 of 27
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alpinord View Post
I'm sure you realize there is a substantial moment force where the legs and vertical support meet which needs to be counteracted. Are those extrudes or shells for the tubes and what application are you using?
Yes, I'm going to work on having all the forces/moments balanced. I should be able to simulate loading here at work with some FEA. The tubes are extrudes, I get to just draw a circle, tell it the wall thickness and how long I want it, instant pipe. This is all in SoildWorks 2008.

Quote:
Whenever you get something together and convenient is fine. It's just an excuse to test a 3rd party 3d source file. There's an email address on my home design site.
I haven't been really motivated to start this over at home (software is not previous version compatible-I have '05). Yesterday we updated our 3-seat license and I was w/o a working version for 1.5 hours, so I didn't even get work work done, let alone personal stuff. I need to finish models before I can source material though....
post #12 of 27
You can't export to an older version format in SolidWorks?

Also, a bottom bracket or down tube support option might be an alternative approach.....





...and there's the use a bike trainer as a stand and rack approach....
post #13 of 27
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alpinord View Post

I gave that some thought, especially after finding 2 NIB Thule racks for sale locally at $25 each.

Quote:
...and there's the use a bike trainer as a stand and rack approach....
In time, but those are just waaay to much money for me to buy one right now. In the shower this morning (I do some of my best thinking in there) i was tossing the idea around of making my own trainer stand using ferofluid damping.
post #14 of 27
Well....my Cyclops has seen little use and I wouldn't miss it......

Anyone use a Topeak Flashstand?



The bottom bracket/lower tube approach is possibly easier to deal with from a loading stand point and possibly requires less materials. You're dealing with direct bearing and rotation forces rather than a longer tube acting like a lever. Seems like an additional tub clamp or strap along a 'tray' would allow you to support and secure the bike and leave the front wheel on.

(FYI the Terminator tuning stand can support bikes. )
post #15 of 27


I have an older version of this rack. I had to add a block of wood to clear the knobby tires of my MTB's. Also the feet fell off! I wouldn't recommend this one.

Something to consider with a drop-out mounting rack...It is difficult/impossible to work on the fork headset with these. They are very stable though.

I have a friend that mounted 2 ladder racks to the dge of his work bench. He hangs his bike on those. Works quite well, total cost about $8.
post #16 of 27
Thread Starter 
Finally! This is no longer a private conversation

Quote:
Originally Posted by Johnnys Zoo View Post
Something to consider with a drop-out mounting rack...It is difficult/impossible to work on the fork headset with these. They are very stable though.
Thanks for reminding me why I was staying away from that design!

I have a friend that mounted 2 ladder racks to the edge of his work bench. He hangs his bike on those. Works quite well, total cost about $8.[/quote]

Yeah, I have no work bench here. Plus, I like professional tools. That is a good option for really budget minded people though.
post #17 of 27
If you can afford it, consider a Park stand. Perhaps the consumer version. I have never had any trouble with any of my Park tools.

It is hard to go wrong with Park.

If you can wait another month or so, most bike parts will start to go down in price.

http://www.parktool.com/products/det...&item=PCS%2D10
post #18 of 27
Thread Starter 
See above.

I can't afford it, but I can make it. That stand is the inspiration for my design.
post #19 of 27
Thread Starter 
More teasers:



It folds too...
post #20 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by krp8128 View Post
Thanks for reminding me why I was staying away from that design!
Good design would take that into account.....

Seems like a rig that grabbed both the chain stays and down tubes would be pretty versatile and stable.
post #21 of 27
How does the saying go? Light, Strong, Cheap, pick any two.
post #22 of 27
Ya know.....now that you mention it, a 3' ski lift tower section could make for a bomber workstand and bike pedestal.

Here's a site for 3d bikes, etc if interested for a prop for your stand. I have this one coming from a cohort to mess around with:

post #23 of 27
Thread Starter 
^^^Reminds me of an older Volvo...
post #24 of 27
Somewhat dated. But considering that was modeled when you were in middle school with about 1/4 the 3d tools now available, it was a pretty good job as a 3d test object. The master link was even detailed....

Will your stand work on this bike?

post #25 of 27
Looks like a skateboard with pedals.

My neighbor used to work in a bike shop and has an upright tubular stand with a heavy, round base (wouldn't fold up, of course) and one of those devices that grab the crossbar (I think) or some other part of the frame. It has several adjustments for putting whatever part of the bike you're working on at the best exposure for the task at hand. He told me he's seen several similar devices in yard sales. Maybe craigslist?
post #26 of 27
I was quite impressed with this stand. One of our 'extended MTB family' brought it to our 24 Hours Of Big Bear race.

http://www.mtbr.com/cat/accessories/...67_152crx.aspx
post #27 of 27
Thread Starter 
I weighed my options for a workstand, and while I still intend on eventually working out a stand like the one that I showed above, I decided that I don't have the room for a dedicated bike workstand in my apartment.

So I've decided to modify an overall improve my ski tuning stand so that it will also allow me to work on the bikes, here is a teaser:



I still need to fabricate the bracket to hold the rear of the bike and mount the T-track. The track will also carry my ski vice and stands. I picked up some neat goodies at the store tonight that will allow me to rebuild those as soon as I get the bike portion of the stand done...



It has wheels though!



And a handle!

Just picture everything sliding on a nice track, and the MDF top replaced with a nice piece of 3/4" plywood covered in formica. (which I have back home in Maine)
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