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Cold Hands

post #1 of 22
Thread Starter 
I don't know is this is the right forum. What does everyone here do to keep their hands warm? Mine are usually completely numb less then 15 minutes after hitting the slopes.
post #2 of 22
Put a hat on, wear mittens and use disposable hand warmers if needed.
post #3 of 22
I wear Marmot gloves; I think that the Randonee glove/mitten is the best you can get for the money. I recommend them highly. And, like the Ford Model T, you can get them in any color you want, as long as it's black.
post #4 of 22
Try "Lobster claw" or "Trigger" mittens/gloves. My wife suffered from cold fingers in low temps until we scored a pair of ski gloves/mittens with just the index finger seperate from the other 3. Hard to find, but they are out there. We found hers in a snowboarding/skateboarding shop instead of a ski store.

Happy hunting, and toasty digits to ya.
post #5 of 22
Quote:
Originally posted by The Cunning Linguist:
I wear Marmot gloves; I think that the Randonee glove/mitten is the best you can get for the money. I recommend them highly. And, like the Ford Model T, you can get them in any color you want, as long as it's black.
Yup, I also used to get cold hands a lot, then I decided to shell out for some quality gloves (around 100 bucks). I got the same gloves (marmot randonee glove).

My problem was maybe a little different from yours. Half the time my hands would get too warm, sweat a bunch, then be REALLY cold cause they were wet and sweaty. With these gloves the "wick away water" feature actually works, unlike other products I've used.

I was REALLY impressed.

[img]smile.gif[/img]
post #6 of 22
Mittens seem to me to be a thousand times warmer than gloves - actually, TOO warm for me to feel comfortable. If you ALWAYS have cold hands when skiing, try mittens. If your hands are too clod in mittens, (a) use then with disposable handwarmers and (b) see a doctor.
post #7 of 22
Polypro liners can really help too...
post #8 of 22
[accidental double-post]

[ August 19, 2002, 02:15 PM: Message edited by: Lodro ]
post #9 of 22
[accidental triple-post]

[ August 19, 2002, 02:16 PM: Message edited by: Lodro ]
post #10 of 22
or someone else's of course (just make sure you know them quite well already as the penalties are quite harsh for that sort of thing - trust me)
The only other thing I do to try and avoid long prison sentances is buy some silk linings. They are tiny, weight absolutely nothing and keep your hands a whole lot warmer. Very nice indeed.
Oh and stop falling over, contact with snow cools them down. Don't thank me just trying to help!

(sarcasm)
post #11 of 22
I have found thin polypro liner gloves inside of EMS fleece-lined heavier nylon mittens with a longer cuff to be a good solution. I do weekend ski patrolling and I find the liners invaluable if I have to do any fine hand work, like treating somebody on the slope, putting up bamboo, ropes, or signage. My hands warm up as soon as I get the mittens back on. I don't get cold hands even on the coldest of the cold dawn first-runs. I think the air spaces in the mittens seem to be the trick. Of course, a helmet and neck gator help, too. I get the disposable hand warmers for the snowboarder son, since he gets soggy gloves from rooting around in the snow.
post #12 of 22
nice...lol, triple post [img]tongue.gif[/img]
post #13 of 22
gives you a good excuse to shove them down your pants though.
post #14 of 22
Gee, we had this discussion last year too. Marmot gloves work very well. I also like some of the Burton gloves (finger snowboarder gloves). What I go for, is a good breathable glove that have a removable liner. Then I get a some really thin tight fitting liners in silk or polypro. I never take these off except at the lodge. Because one of the problems of cold fingers is heat managment. If my hands get too hot I just pull the glove's liners out and stuff them in my jacket.

I found that by not exposing your fingers to the naked cold, they stay warmer. When I would pull my hands out of my gloves without the tight liner layer on, my hands got cold fast, especially when the temp was below 20F. So layers for fingers works too. It also helps in drying out your gloves at night because you can pull all of the layers out and let them dry.

By the way, were now talking about $70 - $100 gloves. You can buy cheeper, and live with the cold fingers. Your choice.

Make sure that you use those wrist straps so you don't loose them. There's nothing worse then finally finding a set of glove that work for you and then watching one of them fall to the snow where you can't get to it while riding up a chair lift. Try to keep your hands and head warm to start with. This helps a lot. I've found that those chemical hand warmers get too hot for me so I have to pull them out, then put them back in agin because I exposed the skin to the air.

Experiment, find what works for you.
post #15 of 22
Thread Starter 
Where would I find some tight fitting silk liners? I'm willing to spend $300 if it will keep my fingers warm.
post #16 of 22
Thread Starter 
After poking around on the internet, I haven't found a store yet that stocks marmot mittens other than the expedition mitt. This is supposed to complement their 8000 meter suit, so I'm thinking that with a liner, this could might actually be too much...
post #17 of 22
Quote:
Originally posted by Oykie:
After poking around on the internet, I haven't found a store yet that stocks marmot mittens other than the expedition mitt. This is supposed to complement their 8000 meter suit, so I'm thinking that with a liner, this could might actually be too much...
The marmot website doesn't list the Randonees. I finally found them here in MN at Pierce Skate and Ski. Try calling them, maybe they can send a pair to you. 952-884-1990.
post #18 of 22
Thread Starter 
The marmot website I'm looking at lists them. www.marmot.com

The outdoor research pro modular mitts also look interesting.

[ August 21, 2002, 02:57 PM: Message edited by: Oykie ]
post #19 of 22
Quote:
Originally posted by Oykie:
Where would I find some tight fitting silk liners? I'm willing to spend $300 if it will keep my fingers warm.
http://www.wintersilks.com/

Check the Accessories section.

My wife wears the liners inside her lobster-mitts on the colder days.
post #20 of 22
Quote:
Originally posted by Oykie:
The marmot website I'm looking at lists them. www.marmot.com
D'oh! I must have been asleep at the wheel again. Thanks oykie.
post #21 of 22
In season, most of the better ski shops carry Marmont. Out in the west, REI usually carry both mits and gloves at the beginning of the season. Also look for shops that specialize in back country skiing in season. Mountian climbing shops usually fit this bill in winter. The winter silks should be good. Try seveal sizes. Although my hands are now medium/large, I go with a medium liner because it fits snugly. I usually get the liners from the Mountain climbing shops that stock polypro and thermasilk layers. The climbers want tight fitting cloths on their fingers and to keep warm. So they have that one dialed in.

To keep the head warm, I usally wear a helmet, and when it gets very cold, I put a light polypro belacliva under that. I've skiied in -18F and been toasty the whole time.

You may want to wait about another month and start shopping. Most of the winter gear will start to be in the stores by then.

Enjoy
post #22 of 22
Last year (thanks to the overwhelming generosity of my Special Lady) I found myself the proud owner of the Marmot Ultimate Skiing Glove, which I had long coveted but found myself unwilling to buy, as spending $125 on gloves while people starve offends my liberal conscience. Fortunately my girlfriend has no such feelings, and as such my hands will always be warm, dry, and look cool even when the rest of me is cold, wet, and flailing around like a moron. Which happens.

[ August 22, 2002, 10:16 AM: Message edited by: The Cunning Linguist ]
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