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There's more to skiing than movements - Page 2

post #31 of 39
Today while on yet another flight, I was thinking about this thread... and Jim Furyk (the pro golfer with a wicked loop at the top, with 13 PGA Tour wins and over $37M in winnings, including the US Open in 2003). While his swing is "unorthodox", when club meets ball, he's one of the purest hitters around (as I understand it). For a golfer, it's about what happens at that moment.

For a skier, there is an analog in terms of what happens at the ski/snow interface. Whatever else is going on is relevant only in terms of its impact on the ski/snow interaction. BB brought this home for me a couple of years ago when he showed me on video how a hand movement that I thought was relatively inoccuous was the cause of a tail skid. It's all about what happens at the snow...

Great thread!
post #32 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by ssh View Post
Whatever else is going on is relevant only in terms of its impact on the ski/snow interaction.
Steve,,, exactly. So many different body types out there. So many choices in how to do things. What's happening at ski/snow level? Are we doing what we want? Are the skis cutting through the snow like we desire? Are we shooting for efficiency, or are we sacrificing pure efficiency to tweak performance in another form? If we're accomplishing our goals, then deviations above snow level from narrow images of perfect models are really a non issue.

Take a look on the world cup. Many different body types, with different displays of good skiing because of it. Many different types of turns and transitions, each requiring a bit of a different look. And often, odd looking positions above the snow, used to ensure the skis continue to do the desired thing on the snow. Skill versatility that allows for creativity. Is that something to frown upon, or try to emulate?
post #33 of 39
I thought about an analog in elite ski racing for Furyk, and I think Bode's a pretty good example, don't you?

I think we need to be mindful of our own vagaries when learning, and of others when we want to criticize. There's more to it than simple yes/no!
post #34 of 39
I Bode was one that came to mind as I was writing.
post #35 of 39

Yep, that's the ticket...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Pete No. Idaho View Post
SkiRacer. Exactly the clock doesn't lie. Klammer was according to the announcers [paraphrase/memory] "out of control, he's everywhere" and Gold Medal. Once I kicked thru the wand I limited myself to one thought only(i.e., at Mammoth the last gate before the flats on Fascination, look ahead etc.). An in the zone race for me was when I just did it, no conscious thought process when racing these few times.

Is it possible racers have a keener awareness of this?

Rick, thanks I am glad you see this and really if any Ski Guru on Epic would see that, it would be you. I guess I am one of those skiers that really values and trust his feeling on the snow. If I feel good I ski good. Sorry to say it just doesn't work in a positive light however, sometimes I ski terrible and I feel that too.

Sort of raises an interesting Question.

When you feel good you are skiing good.

When you ski good you feel good.

Beginner to Advanced skiers, does the above hold true? Can a 2nd time skier do one of the above? Does it matter? Is there a signifficance?
...when I was training out at Mt. Hood a few years back, my coach, who was an excellent coach, was hanging out with the US Team coaches and soaking up any goodies they had to pass out. One of which was "We want our skier to be smooth, fast, and natural." Nice mantra, isn't it? Allows for a wide range of approaches, but hits on the corollary of what Pete says, which is that if you feel like dog waste, you probably are skiing like dog waste.

Skiing is kind of an oddball sport, in many ways, but it's still an athletic pursuit, like any other, and as LeMaster noted in one of his Ski Racing articles this year, human anatomy and the laws of physics haven't changed, and neither has skiing. We just have better tools and and carve turns easier, but we didn't invent carving in the year 2007. I forget which article it was, but he said something like "If this sounds a lot like something Warren Witherell said 25 years ago, you're right."

So, I guess the idea is, learn a little, read a little, think a little, then go out and ski a lot. If it works, maybe stop thinking so much. And if it doesn't work, maybe stop thinking at all for a while. As we say in tennis "Watch the ball, hit it hard, and don't think."
post #36 of 39

I knew you were going to go there sooner or later...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rick View Post
I Bode was one that came to mind as I was writing.
...so lemme see..."Know your limits, and exceed them frequently", right? Or maybe it's "If you're not turning, go faster"...
post #37 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkiRacer55
...if you feel like dog waste, you probably are skiing like dog waste.
And speaking of Bode, how do you explain his perfectly reasonable performance despite skiing Hung Over ?

.ma
post #38 of 39

A perfect example of...

Quote:
Originally Posted by michaelA View Post
And speaking of Bode, how do you explain his perfectly reasonable performance despite skiing Hung Over ?

.ma
...something that Edy Thys said some years ago, after finishing a surprising 4th in a Park City WC GS: "The dumber, the better."
post #39 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by epic View Post
I'd rather have someone tell me "do this with your skis" instead of dorsiflex this while you flex that".
Good topic, epic. Sometimes we need to 'flex that' in order to make our skis feel better. But that's the litmus test for a good skier; is what I'm applying help my skis feel better.

Only good teachers are able to introduce new levels of snow-ski appreciation.
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