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Bike Stolen

post #1 of 28
Thread Starter 
Yep. Found out today, went downstairs to check on the frame size and I found the storage cage pried open.



It's gone, the bastards crawled through a window and pried open the storage cage. The squeezed the bike out through a slot less then a foot wide and walked up the stairs and out the building.

Police report has been filed, apparently there have been a lot of thefts in the complex lately. Figures, I just moved here 6/14. I don't hold much hope of seeing it again unless the kid who stole it rides it around here. I'll check on my renters insurance tomorrow and see if it is even worth going that route; probably not.

It really sucks, I was storing it in the apartment but decided to move it after a ride last week. Bike shopping after work/class tomorrow I guess...
post #2 of 28
This ought to be a hanging offense. Frackin methhead sneak thieves. Let's hope you get very lucky and see this bike again. New bikes are nice but expensive.
post #3 of 28
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by GarryZ View Post
This ought to be a hanging offense.
I'd settle for the thief putting the front tire back on to loose, going over the bars and breaking a few bones. Call me whatever you want for saying that, but it seems fitting.
post #4 of 28
Scumbags. I assume you'll be watching the local craigslist very carefully - for replacement AND recovery. Not every bike on craigslist is stolen (so you could replace) but many are (so maybe you could nail these bastards).
post #5 of 28
Sorry to hear..it hasn't been your week.

more +++++VIBES+++++
post #6 of 28
K - ((Hugs))
post #7 of 28
Thread Starter 
Thanks guys.

So I went to leave this morning, and I figured I would walk back downstairs to the storage locker, pop up into the other 1/2 of the building, and take a quick look in the hallway.


There are people sleeping in the basement!!!!!!!
The "kids" that we have seen hanging out on the stoops. I don't no if he just wanted to bang his girlfriend without mommy finding out, or if they were actually involved. Regardless, they are not supposed to be down there sleeping. I let the door slam on my way down, so that woke them up. I was just as surprised as they were, and got out ASAP.

I made a quick run upstairs to grab a camera and then headed outside to call the cops. They were still down there at that point, but the camera had dead batteries from using it last night. They never came out either front door, and they didn't come up from the basement on my side.

The two officers seemed to have little interest in knocking on a few doors on the side that I know they came up on. I know they have bigger things to worry about, but it was 6:30am and there have been numerous larceny events around lately. In fact, the 2nd responding officer had responded when a friends car was broken into a few buildings over 3 weeks ago. The cops think it is kids, we thought it was kids that broke into my buddies car (they only stole cds and DVDs, not the ~$1000 stereo), now I see kids. WTF!!

::::::::::
post #8 of 28
Sorry to here about the bike. I had a bike 'stolen' once. I leaned it up against the apartment building, and ran in to get my wallet. When I came out it was gone. I thought some of my 'bros' had hidden it. Couldn't find it anywhere. I started asking around, someone said to check the police department. So, I went over to the police department, and gave a written description of the stolen bike. Then, an officer walked my down to the basement, ther were probably 200 or more bikes down there. Yep, there it was!!! It turns out some unsavory character turned my bike in as 'found lost'. After a certain amount of time, if the bike is unclaimed, they can come back and get it. Kind of a 'legalized theft'. Some of the law enforcement types here may know more about this. Its worth a shot.
post #9 of 28
You can roughly tell the frame size on road frames just by looking at the length of headtube between the TT and DT.

One and a half fingers -> 52-54 cm.

I fully expect you to be able to wrap a fist around the HT between the two tubes on the bike you eventually get.
post #10 of 28
Thread Starter 
comprex,

I think the bike was in the 46-48cm range, hence the seat height.

Any opinions on Scott Bikes?

i.e. Speedster S30

Full 105 build, I just wish it were a triple.

$1019 at EMS.
post #11 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by krp8128 View Post
comprex,

Any opinions on Scott Bikes?

i.e. Speedster S30

Full 105 build, I just wish it were a triple.

$1019 at EMS.
No direct experience with Scott but I wouldn't hesitate to purchase. A very high end shop here in NYC (www.sbrshop.com) offers their full line, from the entry level road bikes even lower price/quality than the S30 on up to the $10,000 vanity models, and they don't carry junk, period. (Also FYI the same bike is on sale at the SBR website at $1039 with free shipping , but the sales tax may even things out with the EMS price.)

About the triple factor - note that the double on the S30 is "compact" gearing, meaning the front chain rings are 34/50 instead of the more standard 39/52. With an 11- 25 rear cluster, you'll have a huge gearing range (34/11 = 36 inch low gear, 50/11 = 120 inch high gear); less weight and complexity than a triple.
post #12 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by krp8128 View Post
comprex,

I think the bike was in the 46-48cm range, hence the seat height.
It looks bigger than that, unless those were 26" wheels.

Quote:
Any opinions on Scott Bikes?
They would be my go-to choice for carbon CX. No idea on the Al roadies.

Quote:
i.e. Speedster S30

Full 105 build, I just wish it were a triple.

$1019 at EMS.
You know my thoughts on road triples: you don't need them if you have a compact double.

EMS has really good warranty + service deals - worth becoming a member if you trust the mechanic there.
post #13 of 28
Thread Starter 
Quote:
It looks bigger than that, unless those were 26" wheels.
700x25c

Quote:
You know my thoughts on road triples: you don't need them if you have a compact double.
Between you and ts01 I am almost convinced, I want to try one out 1st though. A friend at the LBS had me convinced that triples=more gearing for hills=what I need. Now that i actully think about the ratios, maybe not.

Quote:
EMS has really good warranty + service deals - worth becoming a member if you trust the mechanic there.
I haven't actually seen the mechanic there yet, he is always out. I never even considered the bike until I was waiting to trying on shoes the other day, the big red 15% Off tag caught my eye. Then the full 105 caught my eye. Even if the price goes back up, I get 15% off with a college I.D.

Unless I end up doing diner with my girlfriends mom I will be bike shopping after class tonight.




Carbon vs. Al frames, discuss

:
post #14 of 28
Thread Starter 
Hmmm....

Online pricing from the LBS:

Cannondale Syapse 1 Triple

Cannondale CAAD9 Optimo 3 Compact

I could be happy to load either of those on my car tonight, and store it UPSTAIRS!!!

A bit pricier, but still a possibility for purchase in the next few days:

Specialized Roubaix Elite Triple

Back to work now
post #15 of 28
Triples v compacts - don't confuse "more gearing" with "more USEFUL gearing". Overall number of gears is also fairly meaningless since you don't really need overlapping gears (ie. redundant combos). YMMV but I'm not a triple fan. Weight and complexity are not my friends.

Here's a really good site to run the numbers: http://www.juniorvelo.com/?p=409

BTW I've read that we should expect 30% across the board price increases in 2009 bikes due to dollar decline etc. so not a bad time at all to buy a new bike if you can swing it.
post #16 of 28
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ts01 View Post
BTW I've read that we should expect 30% across the board price increases in 2009 bikes due to dollar decline etc. so not a bad time at all to buy a new bike if you can swing it.
Yeah, I could swing it last week, but made the financially responsible decision not to. Thank god, if it was a $1500 bike down there....

I sit on my ass 8+ hours a day at work, I need to get out and move afterward. It will be swung soon...
post #17 of 28
Sorry to hear about your bike, thats a major bummer.

Out of the bikes you listed the Cannondale CAAD9 is the best bike by a long-shot (full 105 and an Ultegra rear derailleur, plus it has decent components throughout). Cannondale is known for making some of the best [lightest] Aluminum frames in the world (due to the weight they are prone to dents, but are fairly durable as far as I know). The 50/34 compact is just that much more of a bonus. The frame is one that you will be able to use for years and continually upgrade. I know a cat 3 racer who rides a CAAD8 frame that he has built up to be around 14lbs (obviously illegal to race on - but it proves that the frame can be built into a great climbing/racing rig). If you're worried about the gearing, you can probably get a 12-27 cassette for $65 - still cheaper than buying Specialized/Trek/Giant and better equiped and lighter than the Scott. Sell the 12-25 on the CAAD9 and you might come close to breaking even. If you want help installing anything just give me a shout - I build all my own bikes and have all the tools for Shimano/SRAM and Campy groups (no Campy UT BB tool yet).

Triples are worthless in my opinion. They never shift right, and after a few hundred miles you will only find yourself using your small [30T] ring on the steepest of ascents, so the rest of the time you'll be carrying around a few hundred grams of useless weight. If you think you'll have trouble with a compact crank, spend a few extra dollars and buy a 12-27T rear cassette and pair it with a 34 small ring. For a 2 tooth difference for a compact versus a little ring on a triple it is worth it to just ride a compact and adjust your cassette gearing to where you're comfortable. On my climbing bike [~16lbs as pictured] I ride a 50/34 with a 12-26 cassette and only rarely use the 26... usually I use the 21 or the 23 for climbing. My other bike has a 53/39 and a 12-26 and works for most everything, but I would have trouble doing 4000'+ in a day on it... unless it was very gradual ascents (I'm still a pretty slow climber).

For the Carbon versus high-end Aluminum debate - I'm a fan of buying the best FRAME you can get that still comes equiped with at least Shimano 105 or better components. For the price range you're looking at - the good aluminum bikes are going to be lighter, more durable, finished better, and better equiped than the carbon bikes in the same price range. I built my carbon bike on a budget and still spent about $2500 total [1588g frameset; frame/fork/headset]. I think you can do better with a good aluminum bike. If you find the ride "harsh" from the aluminum, buy some good 25c tires and you will notice a huge improvement in your ride quality. My aluminum bike is a more comfortable ride than my stiff carbon bike.

I hope that helps. If you buy a bike tonight you better ride Saturday!

Later

Greg
post #18 of 28
Thread Starter 
Well, I didn't ride anything tonight, but I have a slightly better idea of what I am going to end up with.

I am convinced on the compact.

I've got to do some calling around tomorrow, as the LBS has 2 locations and the on that I stopped at kept looking up the wrong bikes in the inventory .

As of right now I have a 2007 Synapse 1 Triple on hold (58cm) pending a ride tomorrow night @ Park Ave Bike.

EMS does not have a Scott S30 in an XL (58cm) frame, but I am going to ride a lower model with the same geometry tomorrow. The bike would take 3 days to get here, from Maine ironically.


I really want the Cannondale CAAD9 Optimo 3 Compact though, but the largest size he supposedly had was a 56cm. This also appears to be a 2007 model.

Between the Synapse and the Scott, which bike is better? (I can have the synapse tomorrow)


Greg,

I'm going to figure out what bike works, and hopefully plunk down some $$ tomorrow. I don't think I will make the ride though on Saturday. I would love to, but my riding partner can't make it and I am not in the shape to just jump in and try to match pace with new people. I appreciate the offer though.



P.S., I got a package today, and they fit like a glove!
post #19 of 28
The CAAD9 is still the best bike - even if it is only a 2007 - plus that might give you some negotiating power. Year won't matter usually as year-to-year components do not change that much. In actuality, a 2007 bike might be better equipped than the same 2008 bike because costs have increased so much in the last year. Comparing my Trek 1500 (2007) to a Trek 1.5 (2008) [same basic bike], the components on the 2007 1500 are A LOT nicer than what the bike came equipped with in 2008.

Try the 56. If it doesn't work, try adjusting the stem length and see if that would help at all. Also, make sure the 105 drive train is a 10-speed drive train and not 9-speed. If it is the older 9-speed, negotiate more. Out of what you listed, my second choice would be the Synapse, although make sure you like the feel of the ride. I think the Synapse is a more relaxed ride geometry than the CAAD frame (plus more than likely significantly heavier in order to give a better ride quality). I'm not too sold on the Scott. I don't know much about the frame but I do know they aren't often praised like Cannondale frames are and don't seem to come as well equipped. Both Cannondales that you're considering offer better components (cranks specifically). Truvative road cranks are not known for their superiority...

Check with the shop that has the CAAD9 (perhaps pay a visit) and see what else they have in stock. Ride the 56 and see how it feels. Ride the same frame in a 58 and see how that feels. A lot can be done with stem length and seat-post and saddle setback. Most good shops will swap out stems for you for free in order to make the bike fit. The important things to note are that your knees don't hit the bars when you're standing/sprinting, and that the small frame size does not put you into too low (uncomfortable) of a position due to the shorter head tube. Depending on your torso length, you might get away with the 56.

Those are sweet shoes by the way. What cleats/pedals are you going to use? I'm a big fan of Look Keos. I use classics on my Alu bike and Sprints on my good bike. The Sprints have a stronger hold than the classics and save a little weight. The classics work just fine though.

Later

Greg
post #20 of 28
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by HeluvaSkier View Post
The CAAD9 is still the best bike - even if it is only a 2007 - plus that might give you some negotiating power. Year won't matter usually as year-to-year components do not change that much. In actuality, a 2007 bike might be better equipped than the same 2008 bike because costs have increased so much in the last year. Comparing my Trek 1500 (2007) to a Trek 1.5 (2008) [same basic bike], the components on the 2007 1500 are A LOT nicer than what the bike came equipped with in 2008.
I completely agree with the above. Yesterday I was running on 3 hours of sleep when I went to the LBS at 7pm, and I swear the guy told me that the CAAD9 was more of a relaxed frame then the Synapse. Either way, it was wrong.

Quote:
Try the 56. If it doesn't work, try adjusting the stem length and see if that would help at all. Also, make sure the 105 drive train is a 10-speed drive train and not 9-speed. If it is the older 9-speed, negotiate more. Out of what you listed, my second choice would be the Synapse, although make sure you like the feel of the ride. I think the Synapse is a more relaxed ride geometry than the CAAD frame (plus more than likely significantly heavier in order to give a better ride quality). I'm not too sold on the Scott. I don't know much about the frame but I do know they aren't often praised like Cannondale frames are and don't seem to come as well equipped. Both Cannondales that you're considering offer better components (cranks specifically). Truvative road cranks are not known for their superiority...
I'll give that a go. Of course, when I went out last night to look at bikes I was wearing jeans and a button-down shirt.: The 58 frame looked like the place to start based on me throwing a leg over it.

I am leary about the "Hydroformed" Scott frame. The sales guy starts lecturing me on how hydroforming is stronger and doesn't degrade the Aluminum like cutting and welding, then he starts telling me how the have the best carbon frame and are the only company that makes one without voids. It was hard to keep a straight face while I was thinking "Um, yeah. BTW, I'm a 5th year mechanical engineering student. Oh yeah, I build skis..."

It was painfully obvious he was just repeating something that he read in a marketing brochure. I will give him credit though, he told me that it would cost $40-$50 to have my size bike shipped in, but then as we talked offered to see if they could get it waived and then flat out just said he would take the same amount off the price of the bike to compensate. He even offered if I could wait a week and if they had one to personally pick it up in Albany to save the shipping.

Quote:
Check with the shop that has the CAAD9 (perhaps pay a visit) and see what else they have in stock. Ride the 56 and see how it feels. Ride the same frame in a 58 and see how that feels. A lot can be done with stem length and seat-post and saddle setback. Most good shops will swap out stems for you for free in order to make the bike fit. The important things to note are that your knees don't hit the bars when you're standing/sprinting, and that the small frame size does not put you into too low (uncomfortable) of a position due to the shorter head tube. Depending on your torso length, you might get away with the 56.
LBS

Bikes that I know the have in stock are on the July sale list, the link is highlighted in yellow. I have been looking at the drill down menu on the left, those are hit or miss in sizes and some appear to be 2007 (but those are 25% off).

They have 2 locations. The way it was explained to me is that the smaller retail location I go to is actualy the better location, has the warehouse in back, and has better employees for fitting. The other location is in Pittsford (affluent neighborhood for the non-locals), and is thus more concerned with keeping up appearances. However, I was in the Pittsford location last weekend and it seemed like the just had more frame sizes in what I was looking for.

I'm going to call them today and see what is up with a CAAD9. I might try to get there at lunch but 10 miles each way is pushing it with traffic.

[quote]Those are sweet shoes by the way. What cleats/pedals are you going to use? I'm a big fan of Look Keos. I use classics on my Alu bike and Sprints on my good bike. The Sprints have a stronger hold than the classics and save a little weight. The classics work just fine though. [quote]


Comprex is going to send me some Look Classics that I need to buy cleats for. However, I might try to work some pedals into a bike purchase...
post #21 of 28
Thread Starter 
So, is the

2007 Specialized Roubaix 30 ($1299.99 at the LBS, link is for specs only)

The same thing as the

ROUBAIX TRIPLE
post #22 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by krp8128 View Post
So, is the

2007 Specialized Roubaix 30 ($1299.99 at the LBS, link is for specs only)

The same thing as the

ROUBAIX TRIPLE
It looks that way. I picked one of these up at Handlebars in Buffalo a few weeks ago that had Tiagra shifters instead of 105 and all I can say is HEAVY. I prefer the Allez over the Roubaix frame - but that is personal preference.
post #23 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by krp8128 View Post
Comprex is going to send me some Look Classics that I need to buy cleats for. However, I might try to work some pedals into a bike purchase...
If you're going to work things into your purchase and already have pedals, work in things like an under-saddle wedge bag, multitool, frame/mini pump, quality floor pump if you dont have one already, extra tubes, decent computer, bottle cages, and bottles. If you end up replacing a cassette you might work one of those in too (just have them swap a 12-26 from a bike they have in stock; it will be your job to find the 12-26 on a bike they have).
post #24 of 28
Thread Starter 
Well, I ust got news about my insurance coverage on the stolen bike.


I am covered with a $500 deductable. I would need to get the bike appraised for replacement cost. Assuming an $800 replacement cost, I would see $300 and my parents would see an increase in the premium.



So, anyone know what grade component is comparable to the Shimano Altius on the stolen bike? I'm thinking that it is equivalent to the Sora or Tiagra now.
post #25 of 28
Altius is really low level. Below Sora I believe - designed for low end mountain and commuter bikes I think. It might be the lowest level Shimano drivetrain that is still indexed...
post #26 of 28
They used to hang horse thieves .....this sucks Kyle.

FWLIW, I'm going to be in the neighborhood of 'Wisconsin's Largest Bike shop' for a week and heading out just before their annual Mega Sale. If there is anything you are interested in, I could check into forthcoming price breaks, their stocked bikes and shipping charges to see if it is a good option for you.
post #27 of 28
Thread Starter 

Photo documentary time...

First thing I saw when I went to the basement:



The window they came in through:



They were considerate enough to leave me my pump though:



And here is what I did this morning to rectify the situation:



2008 Cannondale Six13 6

This thing is living inside the apartment...
post #28 of 28
SCORE. Have fun.
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