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MA for ChuckT

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 
My aspiration is to ski a2a. More background info is in this thread
http://forums.epicski.com/showthread.php?t=71009

Sorry, this flat beginners slope is not a good place to ski for MA but it's the only place my wife could take a video of me. I see A-frame, very low edge angle, not sure if the CoM is smooth or jerky. Also not sure, but I feel it easier to ski more "cleanly" faster, but I was already discourteously fast on this slope.




Thank you for your MA
post #2 of 18
Care to share a bit about your intent in these turns (other than dodging the others who were sharing the slope with you!)?

The cleaner feel of skiing faster is often because it smooths out some of the irregularities of the slope and some of the challenges in balance and movements for the skier...
post #3 of 18
Looks to me like you're skiing ski to ski rather than a2a by raising the inside ski to emphasize the outside one rather than transitioning progressively from one ski to the other. This practice will be more difficult to balance at slower speeds, as Steve points out.
post #4 of 18
Thread Starter 
I was trying to carve, obviously unsuccessfully. My intent was to get higher edge angles and smooth transition from turn to turn.
post #5 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kneale Brownson View Post
Looks to me like you're skiing ski to ski rather than a2a by raising the inside ski to emphasize the outside one rather than transitioning progressively from one ski to the other. This practice will be more difficult to balance at slower speeds, as Steve points out.
Yes, my intent (not necessarily the outcome) was to shift weight to the outside ski 100%. I think Bob Barnes called it active weight shift. Is this practice incompatible with my a2a goal?

Note to Moderators: If you think this thread may be more appropriate as a continuation of the thread I started in the Technique & Analysis forum, please move it there.
post #6 of 18
Chuck,

I like the edge angles and the balance in the bottom half of the turn. On a flatter trail you need higher speed to support higher edge angles. What you develop here is high for this slope pitch and appropriate for your speed. In these turns, you are getting your feet out from directly underneath your torso. This is a good start for arc to arc skiing.

Your turn initiation move relies upon crossing the legs underneath the body combined with sliding the inside ski closer to the outside in order to help build early edge angle. My recommendation is to do "the drill" where you lift and tip your inside ski during turn initiation. This will help you develop the movements needed to start engaging your inside edges earlier in the turn without cheating (i.e. sliding the inside foot).
post #7 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by therusty View Post
Your turn initiation move relies upon crossing the legs underneath the body combined with sliding the inside ski closer to the outside in order to help build early edge angle. My recommendation is to do "the drill" where you lift and tip your inside ski during turn initiation. This will help you develop the movements needed to start engaging your inside edges earlier in the turn without cheating (i.e. sliding the inside foot).
I think therusty has a great point here with identifying what is happening with the inside ski. It is tricky because your intent (thanks for asking him ssh) was to actively shift 100% of your weight to the outside ski which is what may have brought that into your skiing on this video. I agree with therusty on obtaining a higher edge angle with your inside ski at initiation and I think what he suggested is very effective at that.

My addition to your skiing is after you are able to feel the difference from A-frame to active inside leg (as therusty suggested) consider that your movement with your CoM can be improved by directing it more into the direction of the next turn rather than what I see in the video, which is more vertical.

I feel that your vertical move at turn initiation is delaying your ability to create an early edge engagement with the either ski before the fall line. In the video, it seemed to me that you came to an effective edge at the fall line but if your goal is arc to arc then it should be happening before it, really.

If you are able to project your CoM into the direction of your next turn you also may be able to feel the difference between cross-over and cross-under turns. Difference being, CoM moving over feet and feet moving under CoM at turn initiation, respectfully.

Just a few more things to think about....like always!

-nerd

P.S. That's Little Eagle at Mammoth I'm sure of it, I recognize that snowboard instructor that comes into the shot. That's great, I hated that blue/gold uniform!
post #8 of 18
Thread Starter 
Nerd, therusty,

Thanks! I see what you are saying.

I just learned that my intent to shift weight 100% actively was not good for arc to arc. Can't wait for the snow.

nerd, yes! That's Little Eagle at Mammoth. You recognize someone from the video? You work there?

Chuck
post #9 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChuckT View Post
nerd, yes! That's Little Eagle at Mammoth. You recognize someone from the video? You work there?
I recognize the face of that SB instructor but do not remember his name, there are a lot of us!

Yes, I've worked out of Canyon Lodge for the last 2 years. Sad though, I'm probably moving to Jackson Hole after this summer. I've had a lot of great times at Mammoth. If you are interested in finding some good folks to ski with I could throw a few names at you, if you like.

-nerd
post #10 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChuckT View Post
I was trying to carve, obviously unsuccessfully. My intent was to get higher edge angles and smooth transition from turn to turn.
You've gotten exceptional input from Bob, and I'd encourage you to chew it and really digest it. It's rich!

The sensations I look for when playing arc-to-arc on that kind of terrain are the slicing of my ski edges in the snow, and the sensation of both inside ski edges cutting that arc (although with pressure progressively moving to the inside edge of the outside ski during the course of the turn). By slicing, I mean the movement of a carving knife through meat. You don't just push down, you slice. By both edges, I don't mean equal weight, but rather that I can feel both skis on the snow and feel the pressure change from ski to ski as the new ski becomes outside. I like those pressure changes to be like a pendulum... increase... then decrease.

When I look at your skiing, I see you doing what you intend in terms of getting all your weight onto the new outside ski. But, it's contrived. You're using a lot of muscle to do it.

Here's one of my favorite drills (that you may have seen me mentioned in other threads): Start with pure railroad track drills. Try to make arcs without moving your knees at all. Just use your ankles inside your boots. This is MUCH harder for most people than they expect. No knee or leg movement at all. Just tip your feet a little bit... enough to make the skis arc. Do this on very flat terrain.

Once you get comfortable with these sensations, amp up the speed on a green a bit, and allow yourself to balance along your edges (note: not AGAINST them!). Your body moves inside the arcs to maintain that balance, but you're still not making any abrupt movements. After you get a feel for that, find a green that allows you to gently take those arcs onto a groomed blue, again maintaining those sensations.

Even if it doesn't change your skiing, it's fun. But, I think you might find it helps your skiing, too.
post #11 of 18
Thread Starter 
Shh,
Thanks!
Chuck
post #12 of 18
Before the snow comes, sitting in your chair in front of your computer, place your feet flat on the floor and then try Steve's suggestion--Roll your ankles without letting your knees move laterally. You may need to start with just one foot and ankle to get the movement. Your knees will move upward, but not sideways, while your feet go onto edge if you're getting the ankle roll.

When it gets easy, try it standing in the corner of a kitchen counter or in a doorway where you can balance against the door frame. Feel the edging from the ankles. Then think about the bottoms of your feet and feel the edging from there.
post #13 of 18
Nice one, Kneale! Great to aid in visualization, too. So do these movements and visualize as vividly as you are able how it will feel on the snow.
post #14 of 18
There was a simple drill found in Skiing magazine where you placed your poles on the ground and balanced over their length on your skis and moved your ankles while keeping the hips and upper body still so only the movement in the ankles was felt. We tried this with the sun behind us so we could see our shadow to keep the movement only in the ankles to get the feel of tipping.
It wasn't all that easy at first to do at first but became easier when you were aware of other movement you needed to eliminate.
post #15 of 18
Nice one, GarryZ... I'd probably try to do it with bamboo, tho. Don't want to stand on my poles... :
post #16 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kneale Brownson View Post
Before the snow comes, sitting in your chair in front of your computer, place your feet flat on the floor and then try Steve's suggestion--Roll your ankles without letting your knees move laterally. You may need to start with just one foot and ankle to get the movement. Your knees will move upward, but not sideways, while your feet go onto edge if you're getting the ankle roll.
Interesting.
I can raise my arch without any knee movement (and this causes some ankle roll), but that's not the same thing. I can't roll my ankles without getting some small movements occurring at my knees. From the looks of it, it's simply muscles moving within the knee joint. There is a distinct difference between this movement and rotating my knee left or right to pull my ankle onto or off of roll. I believe this is what the exercise is designed to highlight. If you have a swivel chair, you can more distrinctly feel the difference (between pulling your ankles via upper leg movements versus using the muscles around your ankles to roll them) by spinning the chair left and right while keeping your feet in place.
post #17 of 18
The more you practice, the more you can separate the movements and reduce what happens higher up the leg. Rolling the ankle has to raise the knee, but it doesn't have to move it sideways.
post #18 of 18
Buy a wobble board.

Stand on it with one leg. I bet your hips will be back....

Touch mid-sternum with one hand, and below your navel, at belt line with the other. Keep the line between these two points vertical. Try again. Your hips will come forward and you will become "stacked".

This is the feelling of balance you want -- not just ankles and knees. Get your hips involved in the balancing act.....

Hope this helps.
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