EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › What are you instructing on?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

What are you instructing on?

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 
Alright, so I've taken the plunge. I signed up for a Ski instructor school in Fernie, Canada and I can't wait!

Only 1 problem. I have some Rossignol Scratch's but let's face it, they're probably not going to be the best skis to instruct on and to get my certifications on. I'm going through NonStopSki and they have a good video on buying skis suitable for the course. While it says that the twin tip, slightly wider skis would not be bad, they wouldn't be ideal for a course like this when you're skiing all day long, all over the mountain, so I need some advice.

They reccomend a ski with a mid 70's cm underfoot measurement, but I know LITERALLY nothing about what brand / model of skis would be suitable for something like this. (Yeah, I'm a newbie, can you tell?)

So...

A: What kind of ski's do you instruct on?
B: What would you suggest?

BTW, I had been looking at these...

http://www.coloradoskishop.com/item3564.htm

What do you think?

Thanks in advance!
post #2 of 13
Fat skis, skinny skis, long skis and short skis.

For small ones short skis . I use Volkl 5 stars at 161

Bigger kids and hard snow days Allstar 175

Bluehouse MR179 for bumps and soft snow days.,



Most often whatever I had on my feet for the morning runs.

Whatever you can demo cleanly on Often maneuverability is important for group mania.
post #3 of 13
In general, I'd suggest a mid-fat or slightly narrower ski with solid edge hold but that you can also break loose and allow to slip. I have liked the Nordica Afterburner for this purpose lately, but it might be a bit wide for your taste, depending on how hard you expect the snow to be and how narrow you like your skis underfoot.
post #4 of 13
I had a pair of Z9's last season. The Z9 fits the bill quite well. Easy to ski on for low speed demo stuff. Fun, versatile & maneuverable for most other conditions. User friendly for anything, but the master of none.
JF
post #5 of 13
Nicolaib211v, Good for you! Jump in with both feet as it's a blast!


I'm not a gear junky so I'll not recommend any specific skis to ski on but instead will suggest generally that you get a pair of skis for teaching that are...
1) Appropriately sized for you in length (or slightly shorter)
2) Skis that are light in weight, equipped with light weight bindings
3) Skis that are not too expensive - ones you wont mind seeing marred up
4) Skis that are wide enough to ski all the terrain you're likely to teach on, but no wider.

As a new instructor you're likely to see a majority of beginners and perhaps a few intermediate students. Teaching on a ski that is slightly short for you makes Demos much easier and allows you to hop, skip & jump around in tight spaces betwixt your students (which you'll likely do a lot). They also make maneuvering around crowded lift lines to pick up students or reposition them a lot easier.

Skis that are lighter in weight make it much easier to hike/skate uphill to retrieve fallen students far above you and also make it easier to carry you own skis while packing a bunch of young kid's skis when needed. Lighter skis also make it easier to quickly move around beginning students on the flats.

Expensive skis are OK - but only if you don't mind seeing them marred up by students skiing over their top sheets all the time.

On ski width I'd try to determine the snow conditions you'll likely be teaching on your first season or two. More than likely, you'll be on beginner and intermediate groomed terrain and therefore you'll *not* need Wide skis. Depending on your body size Midfats may be OK to do Demos on but if you're a small person I'd think a narrow(er) ski underfoot will make Demos easier. Of course, if the location you're at gets a lot of loose, soft snow on top of groomers then a slightly wider ski will help.

Note that I'm not recommending a ski for you to ski and learn on so much as I'm suggesting a ski that can help to optimize your teaching experience which is likely to start with beginners and entry-level skiers.

.ma
post #6 of 13

Skis to Instruct

[quote=nicolaib211v;928029]Alright, so I've taken the plunge. I signed up for a Ski instructor school in Fernie, Canada and I can't wait!

Only 1 problem. I have some Rossignol Scratch's but let's face it, they're probably not going to be the best skis to instruct on and to get my certifications on. I'm going through NonStopSki and they have a good video on buying skis suitable for the course. While it says that the twin tip, slightly wider skis would not be bad, they wouldn't be ideal for a course like this when you're skiing all day long, all over the mountain, so I need some advice.

They reccomend a ski with a mid 70's cm underfoot measurement, but I know LITERALLY nothing about what brand / model of skis would be suitable for something like this. (Yeah, I'm a newbie, can you tell?)





Nicoliab211v. (Interesting Name?). I have to go along with the post that says to get a nimble ski etc.

As a level one you can instruct on those Z9's but I don't know if you want to spend the $ for your teaching ski. Here's why:

As a new instuctor you will be teaching beginners on groomed runs only. They will stop, step, stradle and about everything else at times on your skis. You may have to work in marginal conditions, i.e., early season and rocks will do them in - but you have to be there. Why be there on a brand new pair of good ski's that you may want to ski on in your off time.

Yes getting arond students, lines, lifts, hopping over ski's, gloves, ropes and little ones will be necessary and is done a lot easier on short ski's. I did the folliowing. B ought for $80 a pair of Atomic R10's really good condition in 165cm. Really short for my taste but excellent for teaching beginners and lower level skiers. My normal ski is 178cm Afterburners, 170cm Fischer RC4 and Volkl Goats in 183. So 165 is short for me but sure made teaching and getting around easy. For $80 I wasn't worried about the damage done to them on top or the bottom.

Just some food for thought. Worked for me.Enjoy yourself, teaching can be fun and rewarding. I like Fernie some really great skiing, great moguls, trees and some very intimidating steeps.
post #7 of 13
The Z9 is a pretty solid instructor ski, lots of instructors I know ski on them.
Some other good options to look at:
Head Supershape Magnum (my personal choice, tons of fun)
Head Monster 78
Dynastar Contact 10

Basically you're looking for a ski that will give you good hardsnow performance (you're going to be spending almost all your teaching and learning time on the groomers, at least at first), without being so carvy that it can't be skied easily off-edge as well (lots of skidded turns in a level 1) - a wider body ski (compared with a pure carver/race ski) helps with the last part, as well as making it a little more fun to ski in western conditions.

Good luck and have fun on your course
post #8 of 13
I did CSIA level 1 and level 2 on Nordica Hot Rod Modifieds.

Fantastic ski.
post #9 of 13
A few folk were on the Z9's-all passed.
post #10 of 13
Personally, I teach on an old pair of soft twintips for lower level classes. I have a pair of RX8 that I use for higher level groomer lessons and my own cert classes.
post #11 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Harry_Morgan View Post
Personally, I teach on an old pair of soft twintips for lower level classes. I have a pair of RX8 that I use for higher level groomer lessons and my own cert classes.
That's a great idea, especially if you're skiing backwards a lot with the little kids.
JF
post #12 of 13
Last year I did most of my teaching on Blizzard Mag SLs and Blizzard Titan Crounses.

Your scratch will do fine. If you want something more instructory, check out the Rossi Classic 80 and the Dynastar Contact Limited.
post #13 of 13
I wonder if a twintip might spray too much for intermediates--Might make your demos harder to see.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ski Gear Discussion
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › What are you instructing on?