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Trekchick is on de-Klein with a little Attitude! SS Saga

post #1 of 85
Thread Starter 
To make a long story short, I have been looking for a good bike to turn into a Single Speed.
I stumbled on to a great deal on a Klein Attitude. For those of you who know Klein, you know they are all about precision, and performance.
If you're interested, I'll post a play by play on the transformation from a kick ass Mt bike to a Kick Ass Single Speed!



The first thing to go is the saddle. Aaaaaaaack!
Then pedals.

I have to say, this bike shifts so beautifully, Its a shame to turn it into a SS, but its her destiny to be my SS and that is what she'll be!


The goal is to get her under 20, which will be a job, since she's 28 lbs as she sits.





post #2 of 85
28lb as it sits now what the hell is in the tires, unutaimium?

at least by selling of all the old components you can recoup some of your cost, kinda of funny its has XTR on it.

things you can and should do...in order of lowest cost

ghetto tubeless on pretty nice wheel with a lightest non UST 2.0ish tire. this will save alot of weight and make it flat proof.

modern, lighter and more upright stem and handlebars. top of with lock on grips

IF you want to spend money..

(new)Shimano XT deore crank with integrated BB

Modern air suspended Fork, the Rebas are really nice and weigh about 3.5 pounds.

The joint project using mine and lonnie left over parts yielded this beauty weighs 19.5 pounds despite the heavy ass crank set.



BTW go Car number 3!!
post #3 of 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA View Post
weighs 19.5 pounds despite the heavy ass crank set.
add +1 pound penalty for the color coordinated tires
post #4 of 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tyrone Shoelaces View Post
add +1 pound penalty for the color coordinated tires
add one more for the oversized bash guard thingy..
one of the greatest beauties of a single chainring is more clearance...

when are we riding tyrone?

i was so busy training for dville, i still havn't ridden some of my tahoe favorites... rose meadow to chimney, heavenly to toads, even stanford rock.. when you coming up?

cheers,
holiday
post #5 of 85
ps, i'd love to see that scale.
looking at the stem, post, seat and bar, i'm amazed it could be anything under 23.

cheers,
holiday
post #6 of 85
I won't know for sure until I see her live, but I'm guessing we'll need to transplant that crank to one of the Treks. It doesn't look like that spider will allow modification to SS.

It'll be rough taking that XTR rear off.


Why isn't it here yet??????
The wait is killing me!
post #7 of 85
You could go truly hardcore with the SS and put on a rigid fork: get old-school cred, learn new handling skills, really become one with the bike and the terrain. Sure, it'll be hard on the wrist (but it is mountain biking, after all - isn't injury part of the package?), but my friends who race mountain bikes 'round here work on their handling on their fully-rigid SS setups.

(And a good rigid fork will definitely get your back down a notch or two in the weight column.)

That said, a nice air/oil fork would be pretty good, too. Just be sure you don't overdo the travel on it, as the Attitude frame wasn't designed around the high-travel forks of the past 5-or-so years.
post #8 of 85
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Holiday View Post
ps, i'd love to see that scale.
looking at the stem, post, seat and bar, i'm amazed it could be anything under 23.

cheers,
holiday
Being my firs SS project, I'm gonna be happy to see how low we can go without getting too nuts.
BTW, kudos on your Kick Ass Biking!
I hear you left Tyrone in the dust!

Quote:
Originally Posted by volklgirl View Post
I won't know for sure until I see her live, but I'm guessing we'll need to transplant that crank to one of the Treks. It doesn't look like that spider will allow modification to SS.

It'll be rough taking that XTR rear off.


Why isn't it here yet??????
The wait is killing me!
Patience prudence, patience!
I'll make sure you have it tonight.


Bushwacker, since I'm keeping my other bikes, Its my intention to keep the parts we take off so I can use them when/if I need them.
post #9 of 85
Trekchick- before you think about ditching the crank try this little modification. Take the right hand crank off the bike. Look on the backside and you should see a lockring holding the spider and rings onto the crankarm. Undo this and remove the spider then take the inner and middle rings off. This will give you room to hacksaw or grind the outer chainring and the little extra attachment spars off the rest of the spider---be sure to leave the bolt holes for the middle ring on! You can now attach a chainring of your choice in the middle chainring position which should also give you a better chain line for the single speed. Have fun!
post #10 of 85
Mix and match your parts with the other bikes. Put the better components on the Trek HT and the LX Crank on the Liquid. I expect you should get this bike to 16lb.

I could have my tech at the shop build you a light weight SS rear wheel. I could also get you a light crank. Lemme know.
post #11 of 85
The Kleins an eight speed right? If you swap that rapid rise XTR to another 9 speed bike, you gotta swap the jockey wheels. The gear spread on the 9 is also wider. Its hard to get this to work well....from experience

I almost bought one of these new! I opted for a Specialized S-Works M2 hardtail instead.
post #12 of 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by Johnnys Zoo View Post
The Kleins an eight speed right? If you swap that rapid rise XTR to another 9 speed bike, you gotta swap the jockey wheels. The gear spread on the 9 is also wider. Its hard to get this to work well....from experience

I almost bought one of these new! I opted for a Specialized S-Works M2 hardtail instead.
I think both her other bikes are 8 speed.
post #13 of 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post
I think both her other bikes are 8 speed.
Duh! Uh, sorry guys. I didn't consider that!
post #14 of 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by Johnnys Zoo View Post
The Kleins an eight speed right? If you swap that rapid rise XTR to another 9 speed bike, you gotta swap the jockey wheels. The gear spread on the 9 is also wider. Its hard to get this to work well....from experience
Hmmmm. I've had 0 problems with mine.

Hey, TC - Did you ntoice your bike quiver has a case of the blues?
post #15 of 85
TC, that bike looks like its new! No cable rub, no chainstay slap marks....Nice find.

As far as 8 speed rapid rise derails. I think they are a bad design. I've got 3-4 that have been laying around for years. If anyone likes them please let me know. I'll work out a killer deal. I already gave one to a kid, just because his derail. was worn out.

Converting these to 9 speed just isn't worth it. I'd rather not get into the details.
post #16 of 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by songfta View Post
You could go truly hardcore with the SS and put on a rigid fork: get old-school cred, learn new handling skills, really become one with the bike and the terrain. Sure, it'll be hard on the wrist (but it is mountain biking, after all - isn't injury part of the package?), but my friends who race mountain bikes 'round here work on their handling on their fully-rigid SS setups.

(And a good rigid fork will definitely get your back down a notch or two in the weight column.)
This is what I was gonna say. Pro (shimano's other component division) makes a real nice carbon mountain fork. A couple guys I work with have them on their hardtails (one ss, the other retro-grouch geared) and quite like them. You could also go chromoly steel, but you wouldn't get as much weight savings, nor the slight flex that carbon will give.
post #17 of 85
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Old School SL View Post
Trekchick- before you think about ditching the crank try this little modification. Take the right hand crank off the bike. Look on the backside and you should see a lockring holding the spider and rings onto the crankarm. Undo this and remove the spider then take the inner and middle rings off. This will give you room to hacksaw or grind the outer chainring and the little extra attachment spars off the rest of the spider---be sure to leave the bolt holes for the middle ring on! You can now attach a chainring of your choice in the middle chainring position which should also give you a better chain line for the single speed. Have fun!
Will definitely keep that in mind, but I think I may switch out the crank on this to my Liquid. That may just be the ticket for this project!!


Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post

I could have my tech at the shop build you a light weight SS rear wheel. I could also get you a light crank. Lemme know.
Definitely thinking about the rear wheel set up. Though, I may have to use spacers for now.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Johnnys Zoo View Post
The Kleins an eight speed right? If you swap that rapid rise XTR to another 9 speed bike, you gotta swap the jockey wheels. The gear spread on the 9 is also wider. Its hard to get this to work well....from experience

I almost bought one of these new! I opted for a Specialized S-Works M2 hardtail instead.
My other bikes are 9, this Klein is 8. One way or the other I'll find out if it works

Quote:
Originally Posted by volklgirl View Post
Hmmmm. I've had 0 problems with mine.

Hey, TC - Did you ntoice your bike quiver has a case of the blues?
Um yea, When I bought the Treks, both times, I picked Red, but the blue was what I got the deal on. This time I reallly wanted the yellow/orange/red paint scheme, and this was the one I got the deal on. I guess the Cycle Gods want me on Blue Bikes.:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Johnnys Zoo View Post
TC, that bike looks like its new! No cable rub, no chainstay slap marks....Nice find.
I'm afraid to share what I paid, for fear that you'd think I was a thief!
As for the tech info on the 8/9 and derailer. I really appreciate the input. As you know, I am likely to take it to heart.


Quote:
Originally Posted by songfta View Post
You could go truly hardcore with the SS and put on a rigid fork: get old-school cred, learn new handling skills, really become one with the bike and the terrain. Sure, it'll be hard on the wrist (but it is mountain biking, after all - isn't injury part of the package?), but my friends who race mountain bikes 'round here work on their handling on their fully-rigid SS setups.

(And a good rigid fork will definitely get your back down a notch or two in the weight column.)

That said, a nice air/oil fork would be pretty good, too. Just be sure you don't overdo the travel on it, as the Attitude frame wasn't designed around the high-travel forks of the past 5-or-so years.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bobatt View Post
This is what I was gonna say. Pro (shimano's other component division) makes a real nice carbon mountain fork. A couple guys I work with have them on their hardtails (one ss, the other retro-grouch geared) and quite like them. You could also go chromoly steel, but you wouldn't get as much weight savings, nor the slight flex that carbon will give.
You two!!!! Shush!!!!.
I'm coming off a broken wrist. I'm thinking that Rigid is not in the plan from my ortho. Not yet
post #18 of 85
Holiday: looking at the stem, post, seat and bar, i'm amazed it could be anything under 23.

You meant BWPA's bike, didn't you?

From my experience, it is hard to get a bike to be under 20 lbs without sinking some good money into it.

I thought my rigid singlespeed with a CF fork, Race X Light 29er wheel in front and SS specific American Classic 26er wheel in the back (each around 800g) was 20.8 lbs. But that was on my not so accurate bathroom scale. On a digital scale at the bike shop it turns out to be 21.5 lbs. Still light for a steel bike.

Of course I could go to a set of super light brakes, carbon post and handlebar and probably get it close to 20 lbs, but little would change if the engine does not improve.
post #19 of 85
Thread Starter 
A couple more pics....................Say Cheese!












post #20 of 85
Thread Starter 
Official Weigh In

How low can we go!?

When I looked in Volklgirls work shop, I was a bit concerned that there wasn't room for my lil' o bike, but she made room for the Liquid and the Attitude. Project starts tomorrow, without me(afraid I'll cry when she starts the tear down )

post #21 of 85
I could be wrong TC but the rr mech looks like a regular not a Rapid Rise (or "bassackwards" as we like to call them in my workshop) You should not have any problems using it on 8 or 9 spd but will probably need to adjust the B-tension screw in to get a little more clearance between the top jockey wheel and the largest rr cog. I have the same rr mech on the 9 spd rr end of my Fisher hardtail-no problems.
post #22 of 85
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Old School SL View Post
I could be wrong TC but the rr mech looks like a regular not a Rapid Rise (or "bassackwards" as we like to call them in my workshop) You should not have any problems using it on 8 or 9 spd but will probably need to adjust the B-tension screw in to get a little more clearance between the top jockey wheel and the largest rr cog. I have the same rr mech on the 9 spd rr end of my Fisher hardtail-no problems.
Thanks OS, I should have included that in my earlier post, but it slipped my mind. It is regular, not Rapid Rise.
post #23 of 85
There are a lot of heavy components on that bugger. Shame on Teek for letting such a nice frame leave the factory. One of the reason, this bike was 1800 and when Klein was on its own, it was 2500, it had better (and lighter) components.
post #24 of 85
Thread Starter 
If I were to change these components, what would you recommend, in relation to light weight but strong:
Stem
Handlebars
Rear Wheel/hub/set up
Saddle(I actually like Terry Butterfly)
Pedals, (May stick with a set of Shimano's I have)
Water bottle cage is not essential since I use a camelback

What else?
post #25 of 85
I'm a fan of Easton components. As such:

Stem: EA90
Bars: riser: MonkeyLite SL. Flat: EC90
Rear wheel: White Industries ENO eccentric hub laced 3-cross, double-butted spokes into Mavic 819 tubeless rim.
Saddle: Specialized Ruby
Pedals: XTR

What else?
Post: Thomson Elite
post #26 of 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by Holiday View Post
add one more for the oversized bash guard thingy..
Alas that is part of the problem with using a road crank on a MTB. They do make a 94 MM Bashgaurd for the 30 ring....
post #27 of 85
Thread Starter 
Thanks Bobatt, those are some great recommendations.
Turns out I have a Thomson Elite post, and though I don't have the bars/riser that I'll be using long term, Volklgirl did have a set of bars on hand that, though heavier, give me a bit more rise. I'll definitely be investing in a different riser, possibly a new stem.

For now I have the spd pedals from my liquid on the Attitude. While the crank from the liquid wouldn't work on the Attitude, the crank on the 4900 switched over nicely.

It turns out that Volklgirl was eager to get busy on this project so she flew through it while I was working at the concession stand at the local motorcycle track.
I dropped the bikes off at 5:30 PM on Friday, and she called me to ask where I wanted them by 4:30 on Saturday.

Ready to ride, but still a work of art in progress!!!!




Oooo, and its weight as she sits is 22 lb 15 oz.
It was 25 lb 7 oz before Volklgirl found out that the tires were foam filled!!!!!
I most definitely want to do something with the rear wheel/rim/tire, but the tire she put on will be great until I get the super duper set up.
post #28 of 85
Why do you want to do a new wheel? I wouldn't bother unless you kill that one.

i say just lose the reflectors and then ride it.

If you must make some changes, get some Race Face bars and a Thomson stem. If you really want to make a change, try and find a fork like a Fox F80X. You can probably get one cheap with V-brake posts.
post #29 of 85
sweetness TC



whats frame material is that anyways I dont know older bikes that well.
post #30 of 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA View Post
sweetness TC

whats frame material is that anyways I dont know older bikes that well.
Alumatin - or as the English say, Al-you-mini-yum.
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