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15 days available

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 
Time to start getting ready to go to work.

On Aug 14, you leave for Santiago, arriving at 7:30am on the 15th. You have a flight home at 8:30pm on the 29th.

You have 15 days available to ski. Primary ski area: La Parva.

You are the coach.

You will be skiing with 6 youngsters, all 97's and younger, except for one '95. 5 boys, 1 girl. Good skiers. All with racing background, and including state champ podiums. Three families, with parents there.

Task 1: How would you schedule the 15 days? Ski / non-ski. Include total ski hours.

Planning is important toward your teaching outcome.
post #2 of 14
Depending on conditions and terrain available, lots of mileage for the first few days. Get them comfortable on the skis again so the later lessons can absorb. Then a few half days that are more drill oriented with light dryland. Then start getting more discipline-oriented with a few days of GS, progressing up to gates. Last day of GS would be a half day of full-length courses in full on race mode, followed by some light dryland in the afternoon. The slalom progession would be similar.

15 days of on-snow is a lot of time. I envy them.
post #3 of 14
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alaska Mike View Post

15 days of on-snow is a lot of time. I envy them.
Mike, 15 days available. So which of those 15 days are on, which off, and how much total ski time? Single sessions per day? Double sessions? How long for each? Again, we're planning here. Let's create our optimal targets.
post #4 of 14
I was a bit vague because I don't know the level of physical conditioning. These are 11 year old (roughly) kids, so the dryland prep before the camp may vary widely. How many days they can ski in a row will be determined by their physical conditioning and the intensity of the days.

A lot also depends on what off-snow activities are available for them. Gym facilities? Pool? If you run them hard for 7 days (say six hours on snow straight), you're going to find they're less than enthused and will require a down day. You could also factor in half-days (3 hours in the morning) combined with a more relaxed form of exercise in the afternoon to combat the inevitable fatigue. Mix it up every few days.

You're probably going to have kids show up with next season's gear, which means skis might be too long or boots will hurt. That will also lead to more fatigue. You might want to check that sort of stuff out before you leave, just to mitigate the problem. I don't know what resources there are for boot fitting and shop work at the resort. Might factor in trips to the ski shop into the schedule.

Sorry, it's a little hard to lay down a schedule without knowing the specifics.
post #5 of 14
Thread Starter 
Ski 16-17-18 - off 19 - ski 20-21-22 - off 23-24 - ski 25-26-27-28-29.

We'll go up and scope it out on the the afternoon of the 15th, but that's to explore the layout and we can all talk about where we want to play the next day.

Three day blocks work exceptionally well when balancing volume/rest/freshness. We'll take a couple days for a cultural/adventure trip over the weekend, and then back off the volume and increase the intensity the final five day block.

Each day, we would like to do two, 2.5 hour sessions. 5 hours on snow per day. 75-90 minute lunch depending on weather, logistics. 9-11:30a / 1-3:30p. The daily sessions will shorten to 2 hours, the last five days. This equals 11 days, 22 sessions, 50 total hours. I suspect the weaker skiers will lose another day.

I believe there is a Poma there for yo-yoing SL turns. I'm sure there's a beginning area for fundamentals and games.

There are two other ski areas that we'll have to go explore so we can 'been there - done that.'

10 hours of sleep per night.

So, now we know what time framework we have, how will we fill it?

2-4 goals are probably appropriate. What is the goal(s) of the camp? Again, these are elite level children KI and younger. Their home hill is just shy of 500m vert/ride.

After we establish goals, we can prepare to provide content.
post #6 of 14
My kid has gone to Hood, Whistler and Tux ..... each time for a few weeks.

The kids need a break and each camp has had a day or two of other fun stuff.

Zip lining, white water rafting and the like. In Austria, they did a day of touring the historic parts of town.

Plan a day or two of hiking or fishing or whatever is out there.

It ain't a forced march and there needs to be some fun and culture especially in SA.
post #7 of 14
Thread Starter 
Hi Yukes,

"We'll take a couple days for a cultural/adventure trip over the weekend..." (We're going overnight on horseback...)

So 3 days have been scheduled off - 19-23-24. Plus, play time at other resorts. Plus another day for the weaker skiers (who will have their parents there...) Not enough?

And what would you do content-wise to keep it from being the "forced march" you're concerned about?
"Yah, NOW vee vill be ghoose-schtepping to da piste!":
post #8 of 14
First off, I'd count my blessings that you are not with a group of "92's" and up.

You probably won't have to worry about them sneaking off to sample the local beverages and flora!

post #9 of 14
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yuki View Post
First off, I'd count my blessings that you are not with a group of "92's" and up.
Not sure what you mean, Yukes. Please explain.
post #10 of 14
I think a lot depends on the intent of the group you're going with. Some may want to ski as many days as possible, even if it's for a half day. The last camp I attended with our juniors, some brought twin tips so they could play in the terrain park after 6-7 hours of intense training. They came to ski, and their conditioning sustained that.

Older kids are... interesting.
post #11 of 14
OK, I'll be blunt. They tell you they are going down to the village arcade.

If there is some ..... er ...... local flora they can score from a "bro" they met on the lift, they will.

Some places are not too picky who they sell a bottle to. Some Euro's have lax attitudeds when it comes to kids and a bottle of wine or a container of the local suds. In SA, I can't imagine they are real tight with anything.
post #12 of 14
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yuki View Post
OK, I'll be blunt. They tell you they are going down to the village arcade.

If there is some ..... er ...... local flora they can score from a "bro" they met on the lift, they will.

Some places are not too picky who they sell a bottle to. Some Euro's have lax attitudeds when it comes to kids and a bottle of wine or a container of the local suds. In SA, I can't imagine they are real tight with anything.
I get it!

Been there, done that. I get to choose the age group I work with. I have no need any longer to deal with that sort of stuff.
post #13 of 14
Thread Starter 
So. Where were we? Camp Goals.

1. Mileage. 10,000m vertical/day, days 1-6. Days 7-11 6,500m/day. This equals 300,000 vertical feet for the camp.

Most of the GS skiing will be nonstops, anticipating access to a detach lift of at least 400m.

Four of six will have GS skis +20cm. We're gonna roll. (We do not ski like a pack of dogs. Rule of thumb: if you can see your partner, your skiing too close. Stealth.)

2. Expansion. Specifically, what is taught expands their awareness, not constricts. I watch so many young kids being taught right/wrong trying to fit them in a box. I prefer to be like the 'candy-man' and trigger the inquisitiveness - explore skiing and turn them on to new awarenesses and sensations. It's more fun and generally more effective for their long-term participation.

3. Timing. Knowing what to do is one thing. Timing of the movements is everything. Everything. The necessary piece when promoting quality.

4. Challenge. Stretch them appropriately. Look for and provide opportunities to push them out of their comfort zone in relation to their environment. Create accomplishments that increases pride.
post #14 of 14
Thread Starter 

Something to learn

We'll be driving up into a snow storm (80cm!) on Friday - Saturday should be epic. Actually, sounds too deep for the terrain there - oh well, it'll be fun. It'll be impossible for the kids - 60-80lbs on flat terrain with 30"! Whee! Have to have plenty of napkins to unstuff the goggles...

When we do finally get to the groomed, technically, we'll learn how to ski with our ears low.

In long radius turns, being consistent - stable, methodical, repeatable - is what we want to acheive. Fluid, repeatable movements must be stressed in our upper body awareness.

We've had success in our speed work teaching to drop the ears below the shoulders and ski from there. A learning target was to always keep the ears below the high point of shoulders/back. Tuck your head in low. The result is a rounded back. A new level of stability. It keeps the pelvis tucked under. A new level of control.

Speed guys, take note. It's the real deal. You'll be amazed at a whole new level of control and stability.

The kids will be on +20cm GS skis. We are gonna be rolling. We'll be rolling with the ears low as our default. I'm confident the kids will be dramatically faster after our trip. I'll tell you how it goes.

Open a couple new browser windows so you can compare these two montages:

Schlopy: http://www.ronlemaster.com/images/20...2006-gs-1.html

Svindal: http://www.ronlemaster.com/images/20...2006-gs-2.html

I believe Svindal is the class of the World Cup. His body position is so powerful. Compare to Schlope's flat, sometimes arched back. Who's winning?
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