EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › Looking for input on length of ski, etc.
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Looking for input on length of ski, etc.

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 
Hi I'm new here. Planning to buy two pairs of skis for '09: a carver and an East Coast powder/tree ski. Looking for advice on what ski length will be best for me.

The long version: [[[From age 7-16 I was an avid skier, obsessed. I took ski school from level A - E but I have no racing experience. Somewhere after that I got into jazz guitar. It took over my life and my passion for skiing disappeared.

Due to all the snow we got out here last winter (East Coast 07/08) I ended up skiing 4 times and it completely flipped the switch back on in my head. I'm hooked and have already made plans to quit my job in December to take some lessons and then ski all winter.

I am a Level 7 skier (according to the description below). I feel like I can rip blue squares a new ass but if it's a steep and icy diamond, I can't commit. I'd like to take lessons to get more comfortable at speed & develop all around confidence.

"Level Seven
Level Seven skiers ski controlled parallel turns and can ski very well on blue trails. Level Seven skiers can control their speed and rhythm on black diamond trails, but they are looking to ski on challenging trails with better style. Level Seven skiers can adjust the size and length of their turns and are learning to ski on a variety of different types of snow and terrain."

What floats my boat: tree skiing and tight, steep trails (I came down Bypass at Stowe this year and thought "this is the stuff!" even though I was scared and couldn't link turns down it). Stowe has always been my favorite spot. I'll probably end up at Jay Peak often. Looking to spend a lot of time carving groomed diamonds this year to develop my turns (this is where my interest in the K2 Crossfire or Recon comes in).

I can get pumped about small park kickers and cliffs (15 feet or smaller if they have a good landing) but I'm NOT interested in rails or pipe riding.

I stopped skiing before shaped/fats/twins existed so I have no experience on them. My current skis are 200cm Kastle Speedmachines (87, 60, 75) which I hope to never use again.]]]


The short version:

25 years old, male
6 feet tall
135 pounds

looking to buy 2 new pairs of skis:

Carver for normal EC days:
-K2 Crossfire (174 or 181)
-or K2 Recon (174 or 181)

Trees/powder/hiking days:
-177 Volkl Bridge


Main concern: Is a 181cm Crossfire or Recon unnecessarily long for me since I'm only 135pounds? Should I have not even posted this and just demo?

I'm coming off 200cm toothpicks and have never skied a carving ski so I feel like 174's will be awkwardly small. But I've watched reviews that show big guys riding the Crossfire in 174 and saying "it has no speed limit."

Thanks in advance,

Rob
post #2 of 17

skis

Arewolfe, WELCOME TO EPIC. A great site, some East coasters will come along soon and give you good advice. Just wanted to say HI and stick around, this is a great ski site. Better in the Fall and Winter.
post #3 of 17
Sorry I can't comment on the choice of skis, but for all around eastern skiing 174 will not be too short. My old skis are 208 SGs. When I went to shaped skis a few years ago I got 165 cm Fischer WC SC. The new skis work fine.
post #4 of 17
I have the Recons and have to say it is a pretty good all around ski. I am sure you can get something cheaper and just as good if you read around. If you have your heart set on them then get it. Im 5'10 180 lbs and I'm on the 174. I think its a perfect size for me and should be good for you two. Honestly you really don't need two pairs of skis. The Recon will get you started and be just fine in the east coast powder. Rips turns and very stable and high speeds.
post #5 of 17
Recommend shorter than 174cm. Definitely not on the 180+cm ski
post #6 of 17
Hi and welcome to Epic! This site is populated by some extremely great guys so I hope you'll have good time here.
As for your question according to my very humbled opinion you' d get more speed/high speed and steep slope control on longer skis. But since you metioned the chutes and tight trees as your priority I'd rather go with a ski in 170-177 cms range. You won't need anything longer than 174 for carving the pistes and for the powder I'd go with 177 Mantra. By the way this is a great overall ski you can even use it on-piste while getting lots of joy from the carving. The only condition when it performs badly is bulletproof/boilerplate ice.
Hope this helps!

P.S., don't be afraid of wide skis: almost everything less than 105 mm underfoot is great not only in powder but on-piste too!!
post #7 of 17
go 174 at the longest for the carver, 170 is just fine. Not bashing you but since you are coming off skis that are most likely nearly your age, this is going to be an adjustment to you. Don't pay so much attention to levels, take some lessons and gain competence and skill. Skiing those tough lines when you are not truly in control is an invitation to injury or frustration and development of poor skills. Going fast doens't equate to skill. Going to shaped skis will require a different skill set and a period of time to adjust; if you want to get the best out of them. If you plan to truly carve, you need to take a couple of steps back. Keep up the good work!
post #8 of 17
I think you need to demo quite a few newer skis, and see what you like. Try something in the 165~170cm range..but "not" too stiff either. Your weight/ height will make your selection a little different from others in choosing skis. In my opinion you will have more fun on a 165~170cm ski that other heavier skiers consider too flexible. Being on skis that are too stiff is no fun.
I know some lighter skiers that liked the Fischer rx 6 skis in 165cm.
Demo until you find something you really like.
post #9 of 17
with all due respect, unless he knows how to ski on shaped skis, he needs to start there, Also, if the skis are that old, how old are the boots and has he been properly alligned and fitted? Foot beds? Let's start things on the right foot and build from there.
post #10 of 17
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the replies. I'm planning to take as many private lessons as I can (as much as $500-600 will get me).

I bought the 200cm Kastle's (used) on eBay in 2001. I skied 3 times that year. Other than that I haven't had a lesson since 1994 and haven't skied a full season since 96/97.

My boots were new in 2001 but I plan to get rid of them. Has boot fitting changed since then?

The Crossfire is a pretty stiff ski, corret? Also, any softer Rossignol recommendations?
post #11 of 17
everything has changed since then! You need to get the basics covered first. You are off to a good start.
post #12 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by arewolfe View Post
Thanks for the replies. I'm planning to take as many private lessons as I can (as much as $500-600 will get me).

I bought the 200cm Kastle's (used) on eBay in 2001. I skied 3 times that year. Other than that I haven't had a lesson since 1994 and haven't skied a full season since 96/97.

My boots were new in 2001 but I plan to get rid of them. Has boot fitting changed since then?

The Crossfire is a pretty stiff ski, corret? Also, any softer Rossignol recommendations?
Although the Crossfire is an advanced/expert level ski it really is not that stiff compared to other skis in it price range and category. You have received some very good recommendations so far and I would like to add a couple more. For the category that you are looking at you should check out the Atomic Highnoon, the Nordica Nitrous and possibly the Fischer Red Heat. The Red Heat internally as very similar guts to the RX6 but you will find as a day in day out ski the wider waist will help you in varying conditions a bit more. Although none of the skis that I have recommended are in the High End of skis I think you would be pleasently surprised at the performance and edge grip that they would provide for you.

As for the boots that you mention that you purchase in 2001....how many days have you skied them?? Did you purchase them from a reputable dealer?? ie. not sports chalet or some other huge chain store.
post #13 of 17
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by sierra_canuck View Post
Although the Crossfire is an advanced/expert level ski it really is not that stiff compared to other skis in it price range and category. You have received some very good recommendations so far and I would like to add a couple more. For the category that you are looking at you should check out the Atomic Highnoon, the Nordica Nitrous and possibly the Fischer Red Heat. The Red Heat internally as very similar guts to the RX6 but you will find as a day in day out ski the wider waist will help you in varying conditions a bit more. Although none of the skis that I have recommended are in the High End of skis I think you would be pleasently surprised at the performance and edge grip that they would provide for you.

As for the boots that you mention that you purchase in 2001....how many days have you skied them?? Did you purchase them from a reputable dealer?? ie. not sports chalet or some other huge chain store.
Thanks for recommending, I'm checking them out now. Any notes on the Atomic Crimson or Salomon X-Wing 10?

My 2001 boots are Head. Skied about 7 times since purchased from legit Ken Jones in Manchester, NH (www.proctorjones.com).
post #14 of 17
The Crimsons and X-Wing 10's are on opposite ends of the spectrum. The Crimson is one of the most aggressive skis within its category and has boat loads of grip and energy. Where as the X-Wing 10 said nicely does not. I'm not bashing the X-Wing 10 but its just more oriented towards an intermediate skier that wants something that he can ski with ease.

Check out this link for a better review of the Atomic Nomad Crimson

As for your boots if they still fit well and don't have and major issues, I see no reason as to why you would have to replace them. Other then the fact that you may just want new boots......which is perfectly fine too.
post #15 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by arewolfe View Post
Looking for advice on what ski length will be best for me.

I'm hooked and have already made plans to quit my job in December to take some lessons and then ski all winter.

What floats my boat: tree skiing and tight, steep trails

Looking to spend a lot of time carving groomed diamonds this year to develop my turns

I stopped skiing before shaped/fats/twins existed so I have no experience on them. The short version:

25 years old, male
6 feet tall
135 pounds

looking to buy 2 new pairs of skis:

Main concern: Is a 181cm Crossfire or Recon unnecessarily long for me since I'm only 135pounds? Should I have not even posted this and just demo?

I feel like 174's will be awkwardly small. But I've watched reviews that show big guys riding the Crossfire in 174 and saying "it has no speed limit."

Thanks in advance,

Rob
OK - 135 lbs - 174-5 longest.

What floats my boat: tree skiing and tight, steep trails.

OK, then why would you be "Looking to spend a lot of time carving groomed diamonds this year to develop my turns". Get into the trees and steeps to develop your turns - groomed diamonds - why :? Won't be helping you much for what you said you like. Carving is like terminal boredom after a few turns.

K2 Recon - I've had them as rental a few times (and yes, they were tuned), but they seem to me to be "damp" in the not so complimentary way. Trees and steeps - get some pop - Recons will never be confused with livliness.

Your best bet coming from non shaped skis is to demo as many as you can and see what you like given your style. If you need somethings to add to your list, try Dynastar 8000 as the tree ski and the Mythic Rider for EC "powder" days.
post #16 of 17
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by snofun3 View Post
OK - 135 lbs - 174-5 longest.

What floats my boat: tree skiing and tight, steep trails.

OK, then why would you be "Looking to spend a lot of time carving groomed diamonds this year to develop my turns". Get into the trees and steeps to develop your turns - groomed diamonds - why :? Won't be helping you much for what you said you like. Carving is like terminal boredom after a few turns.

K2 Recon - I've had them as rental a few times (and yes, they were tuned), but they seem to me to be "damp" in the not so complimentary way. Trees and steeps - get some pop - Recons will never be confused with livliness.

Your best bet coming from non shaped skis is to demo as many as you can and see what you like given your style. If you need somethings to add to your list, try Dynastar 8000 as the tree ski and the Mythic Rider for EC "powder" days.
Thanks, I'll check them out.

My desire to spend time carving on steep hardpack is to learn how to carve better and gain an overall better sense of balance. I didn't feel solid at all last winter on icy trails. I had a real hard time on icy blacks at Attitash and Stowe. I saw plenty of people around me that clearly had more command down the same slope I was on. I'd like to get to that level. My favorite type of skiing is def. powder in the trees, but I'm aware that I need a lot of work on turning and control in general, and I assumed that the best place to develop would be on open groomed stuff.
post #17 of 17
Steep hardpack! You want an SL "cut" ski ...... not a race stock but possibly a civilian racer.

At your level, the idea will not to be bombing trails but skiing by turning and turning will give you the speed control. Stay short ..... 160/165.

Learn to tune your edges. In order to ski the ice/hardpack well requires a good and frequent tune that must ..... must ..... must ..... be maintained.

Straight sidewall is a plus.

Oh! Work on proper technique and most importantly, learn to commit to the fall line. Best place is on the blues within your comfort zone. Proper technique is the stepping stone to skiing the blacks well.
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EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › Looking for input on length of ski, etc.