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Would you ever consider taking a ski trip alone?

post #1 of 96
Thread Starter 
I'm seriously considering it as I have a free airline ticket out west that must be used before a certain date this winter. I've canvassed all of my ski buddies, but none of them can make the trip during the week that I have booked off from work. (unfortunately, it can't be changed)

On one hand, it would work to my advantage as I would get to see all of the things I want to see, and go to all of the resorts I want to go to. On the flipside, going out for dinner and out to the pub apres ski would be a little awkward all by my lonesome.

Has anyone here ever taken a ski trip alone, and if so could you describe the experience be it positive or negative?
post #2 of 96
Quote:
Originally posted by N8M:
I'm seriously considering it as I have a free airline ticket out west that must be used before a certain date this winter. I've canvassed all of my ski buddies, but none of them can make the trip during the week that I have booked off from work. (unfortunately, it can't be changed)

On one hand, it would work to my advantage as I would get to see all of the things I want to see, and go to all of the resorts I want to go to. On the flipside, going out for dinner and out to the pub apres ski would be a little awkward all by my lonesome.

Has anyone here ever taken a ski trip alone, and if so could you describe the experience be it positive or negative?
Basically when you take a trip alone you should plan to ski all day; pack your lunch and eat on the chairlift (lunchtime is when everyone else is off the slopes), ski from first chair to last and then just hit the sack early. Alternatively, you could be social and talk to people on the chairlifts and make friends to hang out with.
post #3 of 96
I have went on a few ski trips alone. No problem. I go to ski and meet new people. I think you'll have a great time.
post #4 of 96
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Alternatively, you could be social and talk to people on the chairlifts and make friends to hang out with.
Of course!

I didn't plan on not talking to anyone and not finding anyone new to hang out with... I was more wondering what to expect, and so on. [img]smile.gif[/img]

[ October 02, 2002, 03:26 PM: Message edited by: N8M ]
post #5 of 96
Hi and Welcome N8M! why not join the Bears in Utah?
http://www.epicski.com/cgi-bin/ultim...;f=12;t=000169

or post where you are going under meet on the hill and see who's around.

If not that, then would suggest staying in a hostel or B&B type lodging. Great way to meet other solo travelers.
post #6 of 96
I've gone skiing alone on a trip, (Wolf Mtn before it became The Canyons) but did not go to Utah alone. I wouldn't hesitate going on a ski trip alone, but I also don't have any problem doing the solo thing. I do business trips alone quite a bit so it would be very simular to go on a ski trip, just like the business trip but skiing instead of work related issues.
post #7 of 96
Some of my best trips have been alone. It's not that hard to find people to talk to, and evenif you don't, it's not that awkward to eat alpone in a bar at the end of the day. If you are really worried about it, try to find a camp or clinic to join while you are out there. actully, I'm traveling alone (for work) tonight. that's a real bummer.
post #8 of 96
Most of my trips are solo trips. From 7 AM - 4 PM it's a real blast. You ski where you want, as hard as you want, go where you want. There is no waiting for someone to buckle their boots or discuss where to ski. You can stand on top of a run for as long or short as you want and go whenever you please. It's a blast. Every now and then you can hook-up with some local for a few runs. If you proove your worth, they'll show you a secret or two.

After you get back to the room, it changes a little. So about 6:00 pm you realize that there is no one to talk to about the day. You go eat dinner - table for one - and see other groups laughing and retelling tall tales. You sit quietly with your beer and burrito. If your'e the bar-fly type, you go to the local watering hole. But you feel out of place because you are obviously alone and everyone else is in groups of 2-3-4, etc. Girls see a huge sign around your neck "DESPERATE LOSER".

For me, it's either hit a movie - any movie - or head to the hotel, watch a little TV, get some sleep, wake early, hit the hot tub to work the kinks out, shower, then go ski. So the best part of traveling alone is the hours of 7 AM - 4PM.
post #9 of 96
i did it after my girlfriend introduced me to skiing and then later left me for a doctor.
i would suggest breck, whistler or tahoe or stay in denver and drive out to the mountains in the morning. that would all have enough single-nite life to keep you entertain;
else;
look for the area ski clubs and see if they are making the trip when you are and either try and hook up with them or just see if you can buy their hotel package + stay with them.
post #10 of 96
I've done it and really enjoyed it but the social aspect depends on what sort of accomodation you choose. Hostels are not very popular in the US but I have stayed in some in Utah and Colorado and met a range of international people. Communal lounges and kitchens make it easy to break the ice and you can always hook up with a random collection of people to go out with.

The best thing about going alone is you are to pack up and go on a whim, explore new places and just go where the mood takes you.
post #11 of 96
Once you have a great day by yourself, you will open up a whole new world as described in some of the listings above.

The pros: 1. As much vert/powder as you can handle. 2. The single skier line is fast and it can be your home. 3. Things wind up being cheaper on your trip except for lodging. 4. You can send postcards to make your friends jealous.

The cons: 1. Off piste skiing is a crap shoot and is best avoided
2. Dinner time can be lonely if you go to a place that cultivates pressure because it serves the singles scene.

Brew pubs seem to be the friendliest dinner places and have good food.

People spend hundreds of dollars and travel thousands of miles to get a premium ski experience, why let a friend's cancelled plans or full schedule result in no trip for you? I value skiing both with my friends/family and on the occasional solitary trip.
post #12 of 96
Some of my best memories came during the 60's when I started driving. Few of my friends skiied at the time and I was often headed for Vermont alone for a weekend.

My first trips to Pico, Killington, Bromley, Stratton and Mt. Snow were all solo.

Snowed in and hitching a ride on the snowplow ...... outa money and Western Union (Dad, you gotta understand!) for cash. Mom's "energy cookies" with lots of walnuts and chips ..... to keep me going.

Those first days of freedom ..... and the magic of "real mountains". [img]smile.gif[/img]
post #13 of 96
solo trips can be a lot of fun, when alone I have always been able to hook up with different people thru the day & night as I love to night ski, I'm not so sure how long skiing alone all day would be fun as it's always better with other people, what I have found though is its easier to hook up with people that can ski at your level when you are alone, part of my problem coming from florida is I have friends that like to go but none that can ski with me unless I wait on them all day, thats okay for a little while but it gets old in a hurry. I ski till close then get something to eat hit the hottub get ready for the next day, like I tell people that do go with me I'm going to ski as much as I can not hang out in bars but going out to eat at a great resturant is high on the list.
bteddy
post #14 of 96
I've had great times alone. One thing about this sport is you have at least one thing in common with the person sitting neext to you(on the chair) .
post #15 of 96
I have gone solo quite a few times and had a blast. One thing you may want to consider is taking a clinic from guys like the Deslauriers, you will have fun and meet lots of other skiers.
post #16 of 96
Take a lesson!

I'd guess that better than half the people in a lesson are women. You'd meet women (even if they're married they're sometimes with single women) and ski with a bunch of folks your own ability. If you like them you can join them for the rest of the day.

Bob
post #17 of 96
Some of my best trips come from getting on that bus by myself. When in college, I took many ski trips to Colorado from the midwest by myself. I found myself meeting more people, and having a better time. The only downside is that you ski alone more often, and pending where you ski, this could turn into a safty issue.
post #18 of 96
I just want to add another point of view to this. I live and work in a ski town. There are many days when i will be skiing alone and meet some guest also skiing alone. I'm happy to show them around my mountain and tell them the best places to eat hang out ect... I have met some good people this way. Take that trip Have fun. You might be suprised how many other skiers are out there taking a ski trip alone.
post #19 of 96
Sure, I've done it and consider solo to be the best way to travel. If you are out 15 days, its likely you will make at least 15 new friends. --- The down side is that you will probably never get to see them again!!

My reccomendations for solo would be to try to stay at good clean hostels and choose mountains that are not considered family mountains. The hostels at these areas tend to have a more 'college dorm' feel to them than some that are in the big tourist areas. If you try to stay on the 'cheap' side of things, you will find that there are usually many people in the same situation as you and are there to make friends and meet new people. -- On the other hand, I have found that skiing solo in the 'first class' mode is one of the loneliest endeavors in life.

Hope you have a good time!!!! [img]smile.gif[/img]
post #20 of 96
I take a lot of my trips alone.
Far better. no one to argue with. and you make a lot of friends.

S
post #21 of 96
Went to Whistler alone following a buissness trip. Towns like Whistler are a great place to meet people from all over the world, which can be real interesting.

My first day at Whister I started talking to this guy with saw dust on his skis while in line for the morning gondola. Turned out he was a local and took me all over the mountain. I didn't even get the trail map out once the entire day.

My last day I was by my self on top with white out conditions, 30 MPH winds, and 5 feet of visibility. This was not very smart. One wrong move and they wouldn't find me until spring time. Fortunatly I was somewhat familar with the mountain from the day before, and got off the top.

Although I did some glades by myself, I was concerned with geting hurt and nobody finding me. I stayed near edges of glades and trails where there were more people.

When I ski by myself away from home I have a tendency to ski a tad more conservatively. Ski travel insurance is always a good idea.

Avoid high altitude sickness over 8,000 feet by drinking a ton of water. Water is your friend.
post #22 of 96
I couldn't even count how many ski trips I've taken alone (or ended up taking alone).
Many times I've gone with a small group for a multiple-resort trip and ended up driving by myself to some of the resorts because either everyone else got "skied-out" or too tired to complete the itinerary. That sounds really ill now that I'm typing it...I don't want to sound like I'm obsessed or anything. Well...it's probably too late to worry about that. Nevermind.
Anyway, gang ski trips can be a blast, but solo ski trips are also rewarding for their own reasons, most of which have already been mentioned above.
I'd say, DO IT!! Report back on what you discover (with pics, of course)...
post #23 of 96
I took a lot of trips with my Siberian Husky Sabre until he got too old to travel. He never complained and loved to run in the snow. [img]smile.gif[/img]
post #24 of 96
I take any opportunity to ski. Alone, with people who are bettwer, worse, horrible...

When I had my season pass at Killington, I would do the 5 hr drive by myself, ski by myself frequently. you talk to people on the lifts. Afterwards, take a shower, get a bite, maybe make a few phone calls to my buddies and tell them what a GORGEOUS day they missed.

Sometimes I've met people on the lifts and hung out with them afterward. I can be a much more sociable person when I'm on the mtn. Most of the time, after skiing full throttle all day, I'm not in a big party mood and will be crashing very early.
post #25 of 96
Oh you gotta go alone or with group. Lot's of great ideas already said, here is how I deal with a solo ski trip when it happens:

Plan to take lessions and work on some area of your skiing that you always wanted to improve, use this time to work on it. The lessons will break up your day, give you a goal, possibly meet people.

Take the time to demo new skis. It's easier to demo new skis if either your alone or everyone your skiing with that day is demoing; otherwise, your trading off skis while your buds are waiting at the lift for you.

Eat at the Bar, brew pubs as mentioned are a great choice. Watch the game while you eat, or bring something to read, and don't worry about it. Hanging at the bar in a ski town in winter will give you ample opportunity to talk about everyone's favorite passtime anyway, so, you'll have plenty of conversation.

If your going for a week, and have a car, take a day off an of skiing and go checkout something in that area that interests you.

Go heli or cat skiing if your up for that. Lot's of singles go and you get put in a group.

Don't go with any expectations that your going to meet people and have graet social experiences, if it happens great, if not, bring a book. You'll learn alot about yourself going alone, go with it.

Think of the trip as recon for your friends, learn the area and setup a ski trip in the futur with your buds.
post #26 of 96
yes
post #27 of 96
No worries on the solo ski trip. While living in Smell A, aka LA, I used to drive up to Mammoth bymyself. Its all about dedicating yourself to the mountain, first chair to last. eating on the chair lift. its very satisfying
post #28 of 96
I usually ski by myself and I don't mind at all. I drive up to Whistler frequently and love meeting people from all over the world on the chairlifts. Find a pub with live music at the end of the day or better yet, bring an instrument and find a place to sit around playing tunes.
Whatever you do, don't skip the trip just cause no one you know is going! Clarkoholic's comments are right on the mark.

[ October 06, 2002, 04:23 AM: Message edited by: fiddler ]
post #29 of 96
Quote:
Would you ever consider taking a ski trip alone?
Yes.

First time I came over to work the season in 98/99 I went over by myself.

This time I am also travelling by myself.
post #30 of 96
I definitely would.
Best times I had on skis, ever, were when I was alone.
When skiing with my family, I often used to take a "wrong" fork in order to ski alone and ejoy the run all on my own (I knew anyway the final destination).
A bit egoistic but...I think I'm sort of a cat person.
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