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After 2 years, time to buy my first skis...need versatility...suggestions? - Page 2

post #31 of 58
Ok, I have been lurking for a bit on this one but I very sincerely think you should be looking at longer skis. At the very least, the high 160s. It may seem intimidating, but believe me as you progress in skill you will be really, really pissed at yourself that you spent good money on 150ish planks. Believe me, I have had "too short" buyer's remorse in the past- and that was with carving skis- you're looking more at skis for the whole mtn... So this effect is even moreso. Don't even worry about the "2-3 seasons" you feel it will take you to get used to them, it's more like maybe an hour, max. Seriously. ESPECIALLY if you're on piste.

As for skis, you want versatility and availability? I'd say the best combo of all that I've skied was the Fischer Watea 84. I know, it's wider than 75 but that means far less than one would imagine, as they are superb skis and suprisingly quick edge to edge. I think they make a 168, which would probably be the best size for you at this time. Great on ice, granular crap, slush and fresh pow under a foot and is stable at speed when you want to really burn a mtn down. Great ski, very easy to ride. Deals on them everywhere. Simply enough, if you want versatility in the conditions you have described above, a midfat really probably will be the way to go.

Another great ski is the K2 Public Enemy. Bargain basement price, more fun than should be legal. Light, tons of pop but is more of a park/pow/tree ski than a groomer ripper. But a better bargain may not exist currently.

Hope any of this has helped or sunken in. Good luck with the hunt, brotha! Let mek know if you want more info. Also, the resident experts are Whiteroom, SierraJim, Dawgcatching and Philpug... They are sick, sick people who bleed ski knowledge...
post #32 of 58
Apache is a great ski but very heavy and pretty stiff. My old roommate loves his but he's faster than a speeding bullett. Haven't skied them personally but you can't spit in a demo center without hitting a pair of Apaches... Should be very easy to find a pair to demo.
post #33 of 58
Thread Starter 
Alright...just got back from T&L..and picked up a pair of Dynastar Contact 9s at 158cm, for $400. I know it's not a super-deal, but it's an ok price for a local store. I have 7 days to exchange if I change my mind... so I will continue to do some reading over the next few days to make sure I made the right choice.

They had reps from all of the major ski companies there, and I had to stand there and listen to the Head guy go on and on about their Air Coat technology.. the salesman had me going for the Xenon 7.0 at first...but at $500, it was a bit more than I wanted to pay now. So...I asked abotu the Contact 9 and he said it would have better edge grip...and it was $100 cheaper, so I decided to go for that....who knows what the weather will be like next year - maybe we'll go back to more hardpack. The Contact 9 seems to get good reviews too.

DoWork, I know you probably feel those are too short...and maybe you'll be right. But, for where I am now...my own experiences...and the type of skiing I'd like to get into, I'd like to stay under 160 for now...remember, last year I was quite happy on 150cm, even though they chattered on steep stuff. Who knows...perhaps at the end of the season, I'll decide I need 170ish skis, and have to auction these ones off on ebay... I realise that's a risk I take buying my first skis and I accept it.

For those in the National Capital Region, I'm not sure I'd go early to the T&L warehouse sale again...it's too much like boxing day, and the deals don't really justify it. Sure, the prices are a bit better than Spring, but still nothing to go all crazy about. I give credit to the T&L marketing people though for coming up with this 'warehouse' sale concept...it certainly moves the gear, good discounts or not. I think the discounts are better for ski wear, accessories, etc. I may go back and get some poles later.
post #34 of 58
Right on Jay. Sounds like you did ok for yourself.

RMP
post #35 of 58
You done good kid.
post #36 of 58
Thread Starter 
Thanks guys! I guess I still wonder if this might be a bit too much ski for me at this time - if the 68cm waist is too narrow (though I do like skis that turn quickly and easily), if the ski is too stiff (feels much stiffer than previous skis)...and in general, if I'll still have as much fun going over bumps and jumps as I do carving up the mountain. It's supposed to be good in the moguls though...so I figure it should be good over the bumps and jumps of the "fun" runs. I'll keep reading, and probably be convinced these are ok.

The other ski I wish I could have seen, but was no where to be found was the Fischer RX-6. Despite putting the Fischer logo on their flyer, they don't seem to carry much from them. I guess kunstadt is the place to go for their skis in Ottawa.

My only wish now is that I didn't have to wait half a year to try them out!! Come on unexpected August snow storm...haha
post #37 of 58
No worries. Just look at that realskiers review. Fours and fives in every category! The only thing you might have to worry about is stability at high speed, and I don't think you will be skiing that fast anyway.
post #38 of 58
The skis will be fine. When winter comes get out and enjoy them. Until then, stop second guessing your decision...otherwise you'll drive yourself crazy (LOL).

RMP.
post #39 of 58
Thread Starter 
Seriously... I think I'm going to hide them somewhere out of sight and try to forget about them until the snow comes. Not being able to try them out immediately has to be the worst part about buying skis in the summer.

Anyway, I think I'll stick with them - so thanks to everyone who gave advice in this thread, all appreciated!
post #40 of 58
Thread Starter 
One rather odd note...maybe someone can explain this. Every guide I've found on the ski says it has a 68mm waist, but the ski itself says it has a 69mm waist... it's only a mm, so cares... but any idea why the discrepency? This is the 2007 model.
post #41 of 58
They probably quote tip,waist and tail for the standard length. Maybe the shorter ski has a narrower waist.
post #42 of 58
Stop reading the guides !

It's the first step to becoming a gear junkie !!! (LOL).
post #43 of 58
Thread Starter 
lol...yeah, I just have to forget about this for a few months.... then go back to giving a damn about the planks on my feet when skiing - that will be cheaper in the long run.
post #44 of 58
If you are concerned with price then the Xenon will be good. If you are concerned with learning better skiing skills on a ski that will work well on hard snow and will carve then it is worth the cheap price only.

Intermediate skis are great for people that want to stay intermediate forever. If that is not your goal find a shop that knows something about binding position and get a good high performance carving ski that is properly set up for you and enjoy. Don't waster your time with intermediate skis.

Very few high performance skis are too difficult for intermediate skiers when the binding is in an appropriate position.

Lou
post #45 of 58
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lou Rosenfeld View Post
If you are concerned with price then the Xenon will be good. If you are concerned with learning better skiing skills on a ski that will work well on hard snow and will carve then it is worth the cheap price only.

Intermediate skis are great for people that want to stay intermediate forever. If that is not your goal find a shop that knows something about binding position and get a good high performance carving ski that is properly set up for you and enjoy. Don't waster your time with intermediate skis.

Very few high performance skis are too difficult for intermediate skiers when the binding is in an appropriate position.

Lou
Well...I ended up getting the 2007 Dynastar Contact 9, which was cheaper than the Xenon7 so price led me in a different direction...your thoughts on that? I think the 9 will help me improve my carving abilities, and is probably the right amount of ski for me at this time (ie I believe it leaves a lot of room to grow). I didn't mention it before, but it's worth mentioning that I'll probably only get out on the hill more than 10 days per season - hence, I wanted a ski that I can have fun with from day one, whether I'm blazing down the hill or carving small turns, taking the longest possible route down the mountain, and hitting every possible jump/mogul along the way (the later is way more me...I rarely blaze).
post #46 of 58
Well now my thoughts don't matter, so enjoy the new boards and have a great time. Skiing is always good.
post #47 of 58
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lou Rosenfeld View Post
Well now my thoughts don't matter, so enjoy the new boards and have a great time. Skiing is always good.
Well, I still have an opportunity to swap my purchase, but from doing even more reading, I think these are good for me for the time being. The next up ski probably would have been the Head SuperShape, and that was almost double the cost ($700).

Nice website btw! Sounds like you have a great business there.
post #48 of 58

Get Poles!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jay31 View Post
I may go back and get some poles later.
+1...you definitely don't want to wait in line to rent poles.

The C 9s should a good choice (I haven't skied them), but many people (myself included) find the whole Contact line to be very confusing with the naming and model changes from Dynastar. As an example, the '07 C 11 was called the limited in '08 and will be the C 10 for '09 (if I have it straight). I also recall seeing seeing various dimensions (i.e. waists of 68, 69 & 72) for what I thought were the same ski (but probably different years with a change to the model)
post #49 of 58
Thread Starter 
heh...yeah, I'm definitely getting poles...I just didn't feel like playing with poles with skis in one hand, bindings in the other and a store packed full of people...just wanted to get out. I might go later today.

I found researching the Contact line quite confusing too - as I mentioned above, the waist of mine were slightly different any of the ones I saw online(mine are 69). I also couldn't find a clear answer on if the models have differed from year to year...though the uber-ratings seemed to be for 2007 model, so should be ok.

Anyway...the ski selection experience has been far more complicated than I ever thought, and I'm looking forward to just thinking about teh skiing again and not worrying about the planks on my feet.
post #50 of 58
Jay31:
Thanks for the comments on the website. WE are about to start on it again so stop back.

Sounds as if cost is a determinant for this purchase so you've done well. If that changes shortly go for the SuperSHapes, they ski very well and are particularly good hard snow skis.
post #51 of 58
I've skied only few times in my life, it was last season, and I learned carving and going downhill pretty quick (it took me about 3 evenings to learn how to ski fast without falling while going fast + curving). And today I went to a ski shop to get a pair of skis and boots but couldn't decide on my own. Following what Lou Rosenfeld advised, I decided to go with Head SuperShapes but the salesman recommended me to go with Rossignol Z9. He said I wont be able to ski them (supershapes) because they are very s tiff and agressive and unforgiving.

What you guys thin about Z9 ? I really don't want to buy new skis each season. Please help me choose the most appropriate skis! THANKS

P.S. I ski in New England
post #52 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lou Rosenfeld View Post
Jay31:

Sounds as if cost is a determinant for this purchase so you've done well. If that changes shortly go for the SuperSHapes, they ski very well and are particularly good hard snow skis.

There're so many types of Head SuperShapes. It drives me crazy now Which one do you refer to? (The ones I saw in the ski shop were SuperShape Magnum, the salesman told me they'd be too agressive for an intermediate skier).
post #53 of 58
The mistake you are making is reading too damn much. Every ski is good, every ski sucks. Ski tests are too a great extent a test of binding position and on many skis the binding position is adjustable. Determine what qualities you want in a ski, such as turn radius, stiffness (especially torsional) and buy one that fits. Perhaps you already have. I don't remember off the top (summer brain) the turn radius of the Magnum (I believe maybe 13m) in lengths you are considering. But buy the ski and mount the bindings around ball-of-foot centre of running surface and for the most part even the most demanding ski will be easy enough.

Lou
post #54 of 58
I have demoed both the Dynastar Contact 9 and the Rossi Z9 and consider them to both be very good skis that are reasonably forgiving. You should be able to use these skis for (at least) several seasons.

I have not skied the Head SS Magnum that Lou recommends, but one of my friends who is a former ski racer demoed them and has been trying to convince his wife that he "needs" them ever since that demo day (last March or April).

Jay31, what length skis did you get? I hope they're at least 160 cm, preferably a bit longer. If they're shorter, you might consider exchanging them for somewhat longer skis. I prefer relatively short skis compared to some of the folks in this forum (based on posts), but I think you will outgrow 155 cm tight-waisted skis fairly quickly after you leave the groomers. I made this very mistake a few years ago.

Best of luck to both of you with your purchases.

Ski the East
post #55 of 58
Thread Starter 
"Ski the East", I went with 158cm, which may seem a bit short, but for me, where I am, I think they'll be fine (I was skiing on 150cm skiis happily last year). I came to the reality that I spend 80-90% of my time on regular groomed trails...maybe 10-20% on moguls, small jumps and easy glade skiing. I'd be surprised if I ever get too much into off-piste stuff - i'm mostly aiming to become a great recreational skier. If I do advance further, I figure it likely won't be for a few years. I likely won't ski much more than 10 times per season next year. The next size up was 165, which seems a bit longer than I'd want... I'd rather go a bit shorter than a bit longer at this point.

amid, the Head SS sounds like a really great ski, it was just a bit out of my price range. From what I've heard, it is a stiffer ski and does require a skier to be properly balanced and is probably a bit less forgiving - with only a few ski days under your belt, the shop guy probably thought it was too much ski. That said, it sounds like it's the type of ski for what you like to do (fast carved turns), so it's probably just the ticket. Sounds like you're a fast learner...so it probably won't take too much time for you to adjust to them.
post #56 of 58
guys i've just bought Dynastar Contact 9 (68 in waist and 165 in length), the head guy in the ski shop REFUSED to sell SuperShape Magnum to me, he thought Z9 would be best, but they looked too wide and bulky. When I asked him which ones require more time and efforts get used to, he said Contact 9 are more aggressive. I didnt care much about price difference between Contact 9 and SuperShape Magnum though. I paid $450 for skis and $200 for Nordica GTS Line boots. If I feel Contacts 9 are too slow for me and there'll not much to learn anymore, I WON'T waste my time skiing them anymore and will get SuperShapes next season.

Well, what are your thoughts about Nordica GTS Line boots? What is better for an intermediate skier ?

Thank you all for your GREAT help !!

amid
post #57 of 58
Thread Starter 
I know this is an old thread - but I just wanted to chime in and say a big thanks to all who offered advice - especially those who led me towards the Dynastar Contact 9 as a ski... after a few days on the slopes with these skis, I have to say, I'm very happy customer . Being a slightly older model, I probably wouldnt have considered them had it not been for the recommendation here...

I find the contact 9 a very easy to use ski (for carving), that is far far more stable than any of the rentals I've been on - and a lot more user friendly than my friend's Solomon X-Wing skis... I'm sure they have a speed limit, but I dont think I will approach it with my skiing style. For the record, I've mostly been on groomed slopes, with as much as a foot of powder, and the skis have been golden. I think any more powder than that though, and they'd start to suffer from the thin waist.

One of the biggest surprises with this ski, is how incredibly easy it seems to make bumps, small jumps and moguls... on my second run with them, I went off of a small jump, and didn't see a deep crud/mogul field on the other side - at first sight, I thought this would end with me bailing.. but the skis went through the bumps like they weren't even there! I'm going to have a lot of fun with these...

Anyway...just chiming in to say thanks to the bears :P.
post #58 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jay31 View Post
I know this is an old thread - but I just wanted to chime in and say a big thanks to all who offered advice - especially those who led me towards the Dynastar Contact 9 as a ski... after a few days on the slopes with these skis, I have to say, I'm very happy customer . Being a slightly older model, I probably wouldnt have considered them had it not been for the recommendation here...

I find the contact 9 a very easy to use ski (for carving), that is far far more stable than any of the rentals I've been on - and a lot more user friendly than my friend's Solomon X-Wing skis... I'm sure they have a speed limit, but I dont think I will approach it with my skiing style. For the record, I've mostly been on groomed slopes, with as much as a foot of powder, and the skis have been golden. I think any more powder than that though, and they'd start to suffer from the thin waist.

One of the biggest surprises with this ski, is how incredibly easy it seems to make bumps, small jumps and moguls... on my second run with them, I went off of a small jump, and didn't see a deep crud/mogul field on the other side - at first sight, I thought this would end with me bailing.. but the skis went through the bumps like they weren't even there! I'm going to have a lot of fun with these...

Anyway...just chiming in to say thanks to the bears :P.
I'm far from an expert, but I don't think you can go wrong with the Contact 9's you chose. A friend of mine picked up some Contact 11's at last year's T&L Warehouse Sale and he absolutely loves them. I've read nothing but wonderful reviews of the 9's as well. The whole Contact series seems to be a hit.
I was at T&L the other night and was seriously checking out the Contact Groove, even though I was there simply to have the bindings adjusted on the Volkl 4 Stars I just picked up used. I think I'll be heading down to next summer's Warehouse Sale to see if they are clearing out any other Contacts
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