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A different twist on a ski recommendation

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 
Looking for suggestions for a new set of boards for my 86 year old dad.
Skis about 20-25 days a season, mostly southern VT and Berkshires. Groomers and moderate pace, been skiing for 40 years. About 160 pounds. Would also like something that would better tolerate the crud/spring corn.

I'm thinking something that will hold an edge on firm NE conditions, yet be on the forgiving side of the spectrum. Maybe a bit more underfoot width to deal with the crud and softer stuff?

Side note: We're on the chair this past season...he say's "I noticed that my endurance started to fall off when I passed 80" !!!! We should all be glad if we are able to walk in our 80's, let alone ski :

Whacha think?
post #2 of 13
I know, there is nothing like an octogenarian gear wh@re. My 82 year old stepfather still loves his old Atomic red rockets, but he did buy new boots 3 years ago and has done nothing but complain about them. He still skis all day but it more like 3 runs then a coffee stop, another 3 runs then a toilet stop and repeat.

What about something like a Dynastar Legend 8000?
post #3 of 13
At that age, consider total weight as well as the ski's dimensions and other characteristics.

Same general location, Berkshires and SVT and catskills.

I have a friend whose husband is roughly that age, 87, legally blind as well but still very active. They replaced brand new contact 11's a couple years ago because he could not carry them very far, especially if the walk was uphill. No issue when skiing on them---he loved them.

Funny, I can't recall what he replaced them with---I'll ask.
post #4 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by skier_j View Post
At that age, consider total weight as well as the ski's dimensions and other characteristics.

Same general location, Berkshires and SVT and catskills.

I have a friend whose husband is roughly that age, 87, legally blind as well but still very active. They replaced brand new contact 11's a couple years ago because he could not carry them very far, especially if the walk was uphill. No issue when skiing on them---he loved them.

Funny, I can't recall what he replaced them with---I'll ask.

Ah so, are "lady" models allowable, Rossi Smash?
post #5 of 13
My friends great-gramma is still skiing Whistler at 97. Gran hasn't paid for a pass in eight or nine years. She skis on a pair of old 163 Volant Powerkarves. She likes them just fine, but finds them kinda heavy to carry around the village. Nice thing about being as old as she is, strangers pick up her skis and carry them for her. Always.
post #6 of 13
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by comprex View Post
Ah so, are "lady" models allowable, Rossi Smash?
I don't believe the weight of the skis to be an issue. He still works the other end of a two man saw with me crosscutting firewood. Beer break ever 90 minutes......so did his dad into his late 80's.
post #7 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by comprex View Post
Ah so, are "lady" models allowable, Rossi Smash?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rossi Smash View Post
I don't believe the weight of the skis to be an issue. He still works the other end of a two man saw with me crosscutting firewood. Beer break ever 90 minutes......so did his dad into his late 80's.
RS, I think comprex is suggesting something softer with the flex center closer to the middle of the ski, not just a lighter weight ski. Please correct me if I'm off C

Congrats to your Dad

I guess he's not interested in anything your retro collection offers?

I'd actually think something like the Mark IVs would be practical. Soft, rounded bottoms, but still have some bite to them. Anything out there like that with a new generation shaped sidecut would be good, maybe Bro 179 soft?
post #8 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post
RS, I think comprex is suggesting something softer with the flex center closer to the middle of the ski, not just a lighter weight ski.
I was to a large extent thinking about overall weight, particularly if the choice comes to include system skis (say, Head, Atomic, Nordica).
post #9 of 13
Thread Starter 
[quote=crgildart;925995]

I guess he's not interested in anything your retro collection offers?

I'd actually think something like the Mark IVs would be practical. Soft, rounded bottoms, but still have some bite to them.




Well I did JUST happen upon these babies.....Yahoo 2's
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525x525px-LL-vbattach3554.jpg
post #10 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rossi Smash View Post

I guess he's not interested in anything your retro collection offers?

I'd actually think something like the Mark IVs would be practical. Soft, rounded bottoms, but still have some bite to them.




Well I did JUST happen upon these babies.....Yahoo 2's
Nice

I'm guessing he'd prefer Hart Billy Kidds though
post #11 of 13
Great that your dad's still going strong at that age. My grandfather kept up skiing into his 80s, but had to stop for a knee replacement. Still goes out cross countrying a dozen+ times a year at 93 though

Have a look at the Head iM78. Good well rounded ski. Wide enough that it makes heavier stuff more managable, and a sandwich construction that gives it good edge hold on those harder days. I know a couple older pros (65+) that find it a good ski that doesn't beat them up.
There's also a Chip version of it for 08/09 that takes the same dimensions, but adds the Intelligence Chip to make it a much damper and smoother ride, which may be appealing to your father. It's called the "Chip Monster."
post #12 of 13
Assuming your dad is at least high intermediate, agree about Heads in general (I own several), but if he's mainly on eastern groomers, they will ask for a decent amount of speed and energy from a 160 pounder due to their stiffness. (I weigh 165) Unless you go really short and sacrifice stability (not a good plan). The Chip versions even more so.

If he's happier at moderate speeds, or likes to noodle without excess effort, I'd also think about the Salomon Tornado, which will be lighter and easier at low-moderate speeds than any Head, but as good or better for a light skier on ice or in pow, and also the Rossi Z9 oversize, which is a great all around ski, very smooth, much more secure on weird surfaces than any of the Bandits, feels like a compromise between the heavier Heads and the lighter Sollies.

Finally, I personally recommend the Dynastar Contacts for eastern all terrain skiing. The Limited (last year's 11, next year's 10 - got that?) manages to be both easy going when you want it and tough minded when you need it. VERY easy to handle in crud and mixed conditions, nice carver on hardpack. I've heard that the next one down (umm, last year's 10?) is also really nice, a bit mellower.
post #13 of 13
I'd agree the Z9 is another good option. Personally I'm not a big fan, but it's a good ski, and many of the instructors around here like it a lot. It's very soft and forgiving, but I wouldn't give it great marks for edge hold. Definitely worth a look if a gentle ride is at a premium.
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