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Whatchya workin on? - Page 2

post #31 of 54
SKI MORE BETTER

Lets see, so much to fix so few days on the slopes.

I will be concentrating my efforts on:

1) That elusive NASTAR Platinum...yep, screw gold I want the white metal. I managed gold with what many would consider the wrong tools for the job last season, so with some new proper gear, stronger legs and body I think its gonna happen.

2) Jumping; not in the park, just over rough terrain when at high speeds; its what literally broke my back last year.

3) Handling the chopped up stuff without feeling like I am in a losing battle; already shopping for the right tools for the job, iM88.

What I am doing now to help with all this is: heavy weight training, cardio, and cruising ebay. Course I also obtained a new BIG Ski SUV to get me to where I am going
post #32 of 54
Caption to those photos posted by Cirque: She rocks.

I'm a firm believer in having a few unrealistic goals. Scratch golf, skiing Big Sky like a movie star, being tall enough to reach the top shelf...
post #33 of 54
The shorter answer is what I'm not working on. .. or more correctly stated - what I don't need to work on.

No time to expound right now, but having the ability to master any given situation with a bag of strategic/tactical choices to pick from is the ultimate goal. I think they call it being well rounded ... I feel kind of square sometimes.
post #34 of 54
short carving turns. In particular, get forward.
post #35 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by carver_hk View Post
short carving turns. In particular, get forward.
Getting forward. That's what I'll be working on. I was working on making my lead change gradual and progressive through the turn, and more angulation/edge angle. I guess I'm better at those things, teacher asked me to demonstrate them to the rest of the class. I eat up the praise but tend to forget to ask what I'm doing wrong or how too get better. Some pictures posted here forced me to realize I'm backseat, no shin/tongue contact on the leading ski. That will be my focus.

I'll always try to ski better, but don't get out enough to really expect any significant improvement. I'm happy with how I ski which is an impediment to improvement.
post #36 of 54
greater fluidity, less hesitation.
post #37 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by telerod15 View Post
I'm happy with how I ski which is an impediment to improvement.
It is? Hunh. I've never skied well while unhappy about how I ski.
post #38 of 54
Maybe you were skiing well but negative feeling kept you from your happy place.
post #39 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by telerod15 View Post
Getting forward. That's what I'll be working on. I was working on making my lead change gradual and progressive through the turn, and more angulation/edge angle.
Same here. But getting forward seems to be top priority. I believe getting forward in a controlled manor means one can control the shovel pressure and therefore the turn radius. Unfortunately it looks its a long way to go.
post #40 of 54
I continue to work on skiing variable terrain better. Challenges are keeping my upper body facing more down the hill when conditions/terrain get harder. One bad habit I'd like to break is what I do with my hands, I find that they're rarely out front, and when things get tough I'm dropping them down around my hips and dragging one or both poles like outriggers.

Comprex, your Happy Place may be the tailgate of my truck but i misinformed you about starting time-- lifts close at 4:30 but its ten minutes before not seven minutes after.
post #41 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tyrone Shoelaces View Post
greater fluidity.
Can you describe this? What would it look like in your skiing?

I am asking as someone with a high performance background. I have alot of respect for how you pursue skiing. It has a good vibe.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Tyrone Shoelaces View Post
less hesitation.
What do you do away from snow to train this?
post #42 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richie-Rich View Post
SKI MORE BETTER

Lets see, so much to fix so few days on the slopes.

I will be concentrating my efforts on:

1) That elusive NASTAR Platinum...yep, screw gold I want the white metal. I managed gold with what many would consider the wrong tools for the job last season, so with some new proper gear, stronger legs and body I think its gonna happen.

2) Jumping; not in the park, just over rough terrain when at high speeds; its what literally broke my back last year.

3) Handling the chopped up stuff without feeling like I am in a losing battle; already shopping for the right tools for the job, iM88.

What I am doing now to help with all this is: heavy weight training, cardio, and cruising ebay. Course I also obtained a new BIG Ski SUV to get me to where I am going
I'd add instruction and mileage. Probably would do more for your improvement than new equipment and strength training. Gold in Nastar is a good indication that you are doing something right.
post #43 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by whygimf View Post
Can you describe this? What would it look like in your skiing?

I am asking as someone with a high performance background. I have alot of respect for how you pursue skiing. It has a good vibe.
I have a lot of respect for skiers who can look at a complex line (i.e. complex in this respect meaning lots of terrain features like rocks, airs, etc.) from a distance...say from the chairlift or while hiking up along the ridge in the BC, memorize the features within the line, how you want to ski them, and how you should approach them. And then drop in, and be able to ski that line gracefully and fluidly without getting lost or hesitating above any air. Just skiing it from top to bottom well and non stop.

Having the ability to stare at a line from the bottom, and then flip it around when I'm standing on top and be able to know exactly where I'm at in the line so I can ski it smoothly and non-stop is what I continually strive for.

Here is an example of where I did NOT do this. This was a competition line and I did not have an inspection run and was only able to scout from below with binoculars. Got the top half of the line which was the easy part, but I hesitated and putzed around at the top of my first air when I really wanted to just ski right into and off of it without stopping or hesitating.



Really REALLY gifted skiers can stare at a photo of a face like this:


And not get lost when they get to the top and it looks like this:


I admire that ability alot.

Quote:
What do you do away from snow to train this?
Good question and I'm really not sure how to train for this.

I mountain bike a TON and while this definitely helps with physical conditioning, in some respects (like DH and freeride oriented riding) I guess it can help this "mental conditioning" as well. I'm not sure.

Any suggestions?
post #44 of 54
Tyrone, the ability of which you speak of, skiing notwithstanding, I think might be better cited as being a gifted cartologist since one can be an ace on skis but might not be able to read a mountain without actually first skiing it.
post #45 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richie-Rich View Post
Tyrone, the ability of which you speak of, skiing notwithstanding, I think might be better cited as being a gifted cartologist since one can be an ace on skis but might not be able to read a mountain without actually first skiing it.
I see what you're saying....

and this exact statement of yours,

Quote:
Originally Posted by Richie-Rich
...since one can be an ace on skis but might not be able read a mountain without actually first skiiing it
I think gets exactly to the heart of why I hold skiers who can do both in such a high regard. It's definitely a different skill set than what most skiers might strive for, but it plays a big role for a certain sub-set of skiers. And I think being an "ace" on skis as you put it, needs to come first, before having the ability to do both.

Skiers with a lot race training under their belts I bet might have a better trained "minds-eye" for this than skiers without race training. Time spent memorizing the turns and nuances in a race course probably lays a great foundation for what I'm talking about. (FWIW, I do not have any 'race' training whatsoever).
post #46 of 54
I know you know this, but my most effecient way of reducing the amount of info I have to memorize was this advice I received from PY back in '01 and still carry as a turning point in my understanding of chasing fluidity:

you have to stop looking at the rocks and start memorizing the fall-lines.

When you look at the polaroid, or through binoculars, imagine loads of snowballs rolling down the face and note their changes in direction.

So when you're on your line, you're looking for that hanging patch that fades to the left instead of that gap between two (specific) rocks in a garden of astroids. Don't focus on memorizing things that you won't actually touch.
post #47 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by samurai View Post
I know you know this, but my most effecient way of reducing the amount of info I have to memorize was this advice I received from PY back in '01 and still carry as a turning point in my understanding of chasing fluidity:

you have to stop looking at the rocks and start memorizing the fall-lines.

When you look at the polaroid, or through binoculars, imagine loads of snowballs rolling down the face and note their changes in direction.

So when you're on your line, you're looking for that hanging patch that fades to the left instead of that gap between two (specific) rocks in a garden of astroids. Don't focus on memorizing things that you won't actually touch.
Actually, I never heard it put quite exactly that way. That's really really good advice.
post #48 of 54
Tyrone, thanks for clarifying - fluidity helps me understand your skiing extreme goal.

In racing, we teach athletes how to inspect by section. Connect A-B-C. Some sections may be complex, others simple. Most courses have a minimum of 4 sections, beyond 8 it is quite hard to keep clear. There are always targets that should be hit entering each section. So yes, ex-racers may know how to link and memorize an inspection.

On a street map, create a starting point. Create a finish. Memorize how many streets before you go left, how many streets before right, etc, etc, and then go drive it by memory. Gradually work up to many multiple targets. Create a language within yourself with the intention to simplify, clarify your target instructions . That part your brain can improve.

I'd be in the mtns in the summer with my binocs, picking out terrain, then hiking to it for perspective. I'd learn to trust my eye. And use only my binocs.

Really enjoyed samurai's advice to look at snow and memorize fall-lines.

Less Hesitation? Well, I was assistng as host club at a World Cup in Park City back in the late 80's, and it was a lousy snow year and the adjacent slopes were bare. Prior to start time, the crowd noticed a mtn biker on top of this montster steep drop (Willy's Run?) adjacent to the race slope and directly above the finish area. He had their attention - and he straight lined it. 900 vertical at least. Crowd went nuts. Biker? Jeremy Nobis before he was 20 years old.

More fluidity and less hestitation? You'll get it.
post #49 of 54
These last few posts are great, especially the Nobis story, Thanks! It must have been a few years later that he was racing in that race & had the fastest time going against Tomba in the G.S.. He lost it 1 gate from the finish.

From a different perspective, I was listening in on a quick clinic a PGA tour player was giving the other day. He was saying an important part of deciding his next shot is to first focus on where he doesn't want to put the ball. Once all this is processed, he focuses soley on visualizing the shot & then commits to it. Same thing with putting. Does it relate to Big Mountain skiing .

Thanks,

JF
post #50 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tyrone Shoelaces View Post
Any suggestions?
Here's a suggestion for how to find the line. The ley is excess hydration before the run. When you're at the top, all you need is one look down the face and then wait just a minute. After that you'll be able to follow the "yellow" brick road.

Thanks for those pics TS.
post #51 of 54
I'm thinking about getting my feet farther away from my body, especially in the belly of the turn. Smoother transitions ("like buttah!") rounds out where my head's been...
post #52 of 54
Thanks for the insight Whygimf. That makes alot of sense.

this thread = bookmarked for me, and I'll return to this advice in about 5 or 6 months for sure
post #53 of 54
Tyrone, consider white water kayaking for the off season. Reading and running lines fluidly is the name of the game.
post #54 of 54
What am I Working on?

I am working on believing that gaining technical proficiency will change my ski experience for the better.

I guess I’m a pretty good natural athlete and I’ve always taken to sports with a natural ease and I’ve always bristled under coaching. The start of my skiing pretty much spelled the end of my school basketball career and I was glad about it. Basketball had gone from a happy after school play time, whoopin’ up on the neighbors kinda thing to a regimented daily practice schedule, getting yelled at, running wind sprints and working on offensive and defensive sets. One of the things I immediately loved about skiing is that there was no one there to tell me I should be doing it differently. I was just sliding down the hill with my friends going here and there as we pleased. Progressing from one week to the next from the bunny hill to the two blue slopes and thinking that one day we would be good enough for the one black slope.
Thirty years later I’m still doing pretty much the same thing except that I’ve got enough experience that now it’s the very rare line that makes me feel like I might be so technically deficient as to not be able to ski it.

Last year, after a summer of reading tons of posts on this fine site, I took the plunge and reached out for some coaching. I went to a weekend bump camp and I got some private (non bump specific) lessons. Both were good experiences. I latched onto the WC bump tech pretty quickly and with a few years of practice I’ve no doubt I’ll have it down. Changing my technique on the flats is a different story. The changes I should be making are not real clear to my mind or my body and the benefits I’ll receive once I have this new technique down are not all that clear either.
Right now I’m taking it on faith that putting in the work, sticking to the program, being disciplined and learning new body positions and movements will make the toughest of the tough runs easier and more fun and that being more efficient will lead to longer, easier ski days. This faith I have in my coach and in many of you here in the technique forum is fairly strong so I plan to stick with it and work on being a better skier, but I can’t get it out of my head how the pure joy of playing basketball was wiped out by the regimen and discipline that came with ‘joining the team’.

So I guess I’m working on learning to be a better skier without diminishing the joy that skiing gives me.
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