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Scar Tissue in Calf

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 
Hi Folks,

I have had chronic achilles tendonitis for a few years now and all that time the focus was on the tendon (treatment-wise) but it turns out the doctor now thinks that there is scar tissue in the calf muscle making it shorter, which means there is continual pulling and aggravation on the tendon which is why it won't heal.

I'll be seeing a physio soon but was wondering how does one get rid of scar tissue that has been there a while?

Has anybody had to go through this?

Thanks
post #2 of 11
A solution might be massage. Get one, better get a series of them . Your muscles could be shortening because of the adherence of the fascia to the muscles. It's worth a try and it's very good for other muscle groups and their attachments .
It's amazing how much they can find that needs correction and it's also amazing how much more range of motion you get after treatment .
A regular regimen of massage would be best for continued muscular activity that causes strains to connective tissues
post #3 of 11
I'd go for a "massage" by a physio therapist. When I was recovering from six months in casts and boots following surgical reattachment of my Achilles tendon, I had a therapist work the "knots" out of my calf muscle with really deep massaging. It was most uncomfortable and a lot of work for the therapist, but it got the calf muscle loosened up again.

BTW, I've found it's really important to warm the calf/tendon up with some exercise like toe rises and then stretch for a long period of time to keep the Achilles and calf flexible. I stand on a 30-degree platform for between 10 and 15 minutes daily after warming up. I've been doing this now for a dozen years. I don't want to rupture another Achilles.
post #4 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kneale Brownson View Post
I'd go for a "massage" by a physio therapist. When I was recovering from six months in casts and boots following surgical reattachment of my Achilles tendon, I had a therapist work the "knots" out of my calf muscle with really deep massaging. It was most uncomfortable and a lot of work for the therapist, but it got the calf muscle loosened up again.

BTW, I've found it's really important to warm the calf/tendon up with some exercise like toe rises and then stretch for a long period of time to keep the Achilles and calf flexible. I stand on a 30-degree platform for between 10 and 15 minutes daily after warming up. I've been doing this now for a dozen years. I don't want to rupture another Achilles.
Geez Kneale what did you think I was suggesting ?
Should I have suggested therapeutic muscular manipulation ?
I started a regular massage after a bad fall and couldn't believe how messed up my body was from years of physical abuse,

The gains from the feeling of well-being to a much larger range of motion we're nearly spectacular .It isn't all fun and games. Like it is said. No pain no gain.
post #5 of 11
Get on the ball.
Take a tennis or raquet ball and roll away the pain.
check this link, scroll down to the 'foam roller series'.
http://ericcressey.blogspot.com/
post #6 of 11
Thread Starter 
Hi Guys,

Thanks for all the responses.

Loboskis - I actually have a foam roller but thanks for the video. There were some movements I didn't know about that I want to start using. I am not sure about the ball though, not sure if it can produce enough force to get into my calves. I am a big guy (6'5" 245 lbs - 30lbs over ideal) and to get up on my hands like that will also probably give me rotator cuff problems. I also have "the stick" which is like a rolling pin that I use on my calf. It works ok but again doesn't produce the force I need (I think).

GarryZ - I did try massage but haven't yet found someone who seems competent enough to know what he/she is doing. They all say they work on athletes but when I ask them how they use massage to remove scar tissue their eyes always kinda look away but they 'sound' confident. They say that as they 'work' the tissue then blah blah blah ... without really saying anything. I'll probably keep looking.

Kneale - How do you make one of those platforms?

thanks
post #7 of 11
From Wikipedia (hey it's a start)

Myofascial release

Myofascial release refers to the manual massage technique for stretching the fascia and releasing bonds between fascia, integument, and muscles with the goal of eliminating pain, increasing range of motion and equilibrioception. Myofascial release usually involves applying shear compression or tension in various directions, or by skin rolling.elease refers to the manual massage technique for stretching the fascia and releasing bonds between fascia, integument, and muscles with the goal of eliminating pain, increasing range of motion and equilibrioception. Myofascial release usually involves applying shear compression or tension in various directions, or by skin rolling.

That's the kind of massage we're talkin' bout. It hurts like hell.
post #8 of 11
You need to go to a Rolfer! www.rolf.org

or someone trained in "ART" Active release technique. http://www.activerelease.com/what_patients.asp

I have been thriugh a ten session rolfing treatment and also to the Seattle Seahawks chiroptractor who practices ART on Matt Hasselback among others. He worked on my sons pitching arm when he was playing baseball in high school and I have also had ART performed. I highly recommend both of these therapies. Particularly for fascial release.
post #9 of 11
My thought was a medical therapist, not a massage like you might get at a spa.

My ramp is a couple pieces of 1X6 wood cut to create a right triangle with a 30-degree angle at the acute end and a 12X12 platform screwed to the hypotenuse. If this description isn't clear, I can take a photo.
post #10 of 11
Thread Starter 
Yeah I have tried both Rolfing and ART and wasn't 'that' impressed. It could have been the practitioners though. I'll keep looking for someone I like in the massage arena.

Kneale, thanks for the description. It is clear but I am horrible with cutting and making angles exact etc... LOL

I'll see if I can just prop up a piece of wood on a phone book or something.

post #11 of 11
That would do for a start. The therapists started me on a relatively shallow ramp and gradually increased till we got where I am today.

My ramp's sides are a right angle with a bottom length of 11 5/8" and a upright of 6 5/8".
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