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MTB Shoes for hiking

post #1 of 21
Thread Starter 
My MTB shoe treads are toasted due to rocks and rough terrain and am looking for suggestions on decent (not ultimate) shoes that work well for hiking and are durable. Are there any real differences or trade offs between various shoes regarding hiking and riding performance?

TIA,
Terry
post #2 of 21
Do you mean hiking as in hike-a-bike sections, or do you mean you want to use MTB shoes for hiking?
post #3 of 21
Thread Starter 
Primarily for b'hiking sections, which can be frequent or long on some rides. Mostly just riding, though.

Every once in a while, leaving the bike and hiking for a bit would be nice, but if impractical, I can always pack other shoes if I plan ahead. Sometimes it could be a spur of the moment hike or moderate climb with minimal gear to summit something.

Maybe the broader question is what are the differences between MTB shoe choices?

Thx,
Terry
post #4 of 21
Well, one othing to look at for sure is just what kind of soles do the shoes have. Some shoes like Sidis have hard plastic soles which are great most of the time, but super slick if you have to hike on rocks. Shimanos are mre rubbery and better for that. There are new shoes now that are made more for the hikey stuff. I think Pearl Izumi makes one. They look almost like trail runners, but they are stiffer and clipless compatible.
post #5 of 21
The more race oriented a shoe is the stiffer the sole will be, and the less tread it will have (you have to show off the carbon not cover it with rubber...).

A shoe like the Shimano M122 has a nice combination of tread, a little give to the sole and pedaling efficiency, I'd check them out or something similar.

I've been riding in a 661 Flight shoe for 3 seasons and I have been happy with them, my favorite shoe ever was a Northwave shoe that had a great soft rubber sole but was a race shoe. My experience with Sidi has been; excellent fit, crappy (frighteningly slippery) sole.
post #6 of 21
Do you want something like a hiking boot?
http://www.nashbar.com/profile.cfm?category=600084&subcategory=60001041&b rand=&sku=22270&storetype=&estoreid=&pagename=Shop %20by%20Subcat%3A%20Mountain%20Shoes

Downhill shoe?
http://www.nashbar.com/profile.cfm?c...untain%20Shoes

http://www.nashbar.com/profile.cfm?c...untain%20Shoes

Recreational trail?
http://www.nashbar.com/profile.cfm?c...untain%20Shoes

http://www.nashbar.com/profile.cfm?

I use an older model Shimano shoe like this one. Except mine has toe cleats. It advertises walking comfort. I wouldn't want to walk very far in them. But they are more comforatable for walking, than an upper echelon racing shoe (such as a Sidi) or most any shoe that has a buckle on it.
category=600084&subcategory=60001041&brand=&sku=20 464&storetype=&estoreid=&pagename=Shop%20by%20Subc at%3A%20Mountain%20Shoes

How much walking do you do? Though the occassional mud pit or rock garden? Or, are you talking about walking a mile on the trail?

I usually go to Nashbar or performance to narrow down shoe selections.

Hope this helps.
post #7 of 21
Thread Starter 
Thanks for all the insights. Tons to chew on for later when I have more time. First blush looks like several options at Nashbar are in limited, smaller sizes.....

ChainLove's display of the NW shoes prompted some investigation on their line. I wasn't clear on the 'removable mud cleat' option for the Kameleon 3. Any insights?

PricePoint also has a bunch of shoes. As an aside, what's the general consensus on their Sette stuff, including tools (Torx)?
post #8 of 21
I buy a lot of stuff from pricepoint and jensonusa. I use Nashbar and Performance for their descriptions of shoes. I rarely buy anything from them because of shipping charges and sales tax.

I recently bought a Sette fork headtube cutting guide, and a screw chaintool from pricepoint. Both work great. The chaintool came withan extra tip also! If I was a shop mechanic, or wrenched for a living I would have gotten Park.
http://www.pricepoint.com/detail/151...Chain-Tool.htm

I have a friend that has some Sette shoes. I think its the older version of this one.
http://www.pricepoint.com/detail/164...-w_-Buckle.htm
Although they aren't his favorite shoe. They haven't fallen apart! This guy rarely walks.

I always look at mtbr.com for the review to make sure there isn't some strange defect in a product before I pull the trigger.

Oh, I also have the winter-specific North Waves. The soles are stiff. Nice shoes though. If Paola Pezzo wears them, they can't be all bad!
post #9 of 21
Take a look at these shoes.

http://www.pricepoint.com/detail/129...duro-Shoes.htm

I have a pair. That I bought a pair this year for commuting because they are cheap and look normal. But they seem like good MTB shoes. Not sure on how they last, but seem decent so far. Come with clipless insets and the cleats are fairly well protected and wont get chewer too badly from walking. They are medium stiff and have good support and grip for walking. Because they aren't as stiff as some they are not as efficient for pedaling on a really minimalistic clipless pedal like an egg beater. They work great on a clipless pedal with cage. And the sole is flat enough and soft enough to give good grip on a nice set of pined flat pedals. Also seem to give better impact protection around the toe and ankle than race type shoes. They run a little big.
post #10 of 21
I have a pair similar to this, which I got at a local shop.

http://www.campmor.com/outdoor/gear/...0&CS_010=50039
post #11 of 21
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the beta on the Settes, Tromano. I was wondering about those and always like more versatile options. For that price they can easily be justified, along with a future, better riding shoe if I see the need. They'll certainly be better than my beat Axos....

So TC, if I get the baby blue shoes should I wax or shave to go with them?
(Thanks, sounds like a good option by their description....though maybe in pink? ) Looks like a slight issue with the hex screws when walking on pavement per this review. Removal of the cleat only takes a minute if it as real issue...

For anyone else looking, I found this Cannondale Review review as well.

post #12 of 21

DH shoe

5.10 Impact 2
post #13 of 21
Thread Starter 
I like clipless and the 5.10 soles look like my Vasque soles that are great for sandstone hiking, but not as good for mud, loose dirt and rock hiking.
post #14 of 21
FWIW...Nashbar has 20% off purchases over $100. Ends today!

Diadora makes most of Cannondales shoes. Should be good quality.
post #15 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alpinord View Post
So TC, if I get the baby blue shoes should I wax or shave to go with them?
Wax - Shave - anything you want as long as you post pics
Quote:
(Thanks, sounds like a good option by their description....though maybe in pink? ) Looks like a slight issue with the hex screws when walking on pavement per this review. Removal of the cleat only takes a minute if it as real issue...

For anyone else looking, I found this Cannondale Review review as well.
I have had great luck with mine, and though I hit some hard surface trails occasionally, I mostly hit Single Tracks.
post #16 of 21
Thread Starter 
Well.....a local shop had a 'Christmas in July' sale and I went for instant gratification (and Boulder nostalgia : ) after too much time checking out options and got some Pearl Izumi X-Alp Seek.



Quote:
X-ALP SEEK
$84.99 Style no. 5729
•Ride and Run (R&R) nylon plate for easy hike-a-bike and great pedaling power •Carbon rubber lugged outsole for superior traction and durability •Flexible forefoot and a running shoe beveled heel •Low cut construction for a light, fast fit and feel •Quick drying, highly breathable mesh/synthetic upper
FWIW, This was after not finding my size online in the Roams and not quite in love with the suede on the Sette Enduros, along with the store not having my size in some Shimanos......

They're very light and comfortable, have excellent gripping lug soles and definitely feel like they are shoes not 'bike' shoes. Having a little buyer's remorse, though, not loving the yellow and a bit concerned about the mesh and lightness over time. Might be a little too minimalist for some and there is a lot of lateral pivoting on the pedal that I'm not used to yet....I am, however, starting to like the idea of getting some MTB pedals for my road bike and using shoes like these though....we'll see.

Again, thanks for the input & best regards, Terry.
post #17 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alpinord View Post


Might be a little too minimalist for some and there is a lot of lateral pivoting on the pedal that I'm not used to yet....
Cool. Those are exactly the shoes I was thinking of. Never seen a pair in person though.

As for the lateral pivoting, do you mean twisting at the cleat (float), or do you mean that the shoe is rocking side to side on the pedal? Which pedals do you have (if it's the later I'm guessing Crank Bros.)?
post #18 of 21
Thread Starter 
Pedals are Shimano M515. I think it's the float and the new yellow bases are a little slick adding to the 'new sensation'. All in all, I like them so far and like the more natural feel to them than my road shoes for instance, and solid footing when dismounting, walking & general use. No cleat clacking.
post #19 of 21
Specalized Tahoe with SPD cleats. Hike fine, but stiff enough on either my MTB or roadie.
post #20 of 21
Thread Starter 

Touring/Sport or MTB pedal for road bike?

While considering either the M520 or M540 Shimano MTB pedals to go on my road bike with these shoes, I started liking the idea of the lighter A520s with a slight platform. Any real advantages one way or the other? Other SPD options worth considering in $50-$70 price range?

(FWIW, My Shimano road shoes and possibly pedals will be available if anyone is interested.)
post #21 of 21
I highly recommend the Pearl Izumi X-Alp (they have a couple of different versions). I do quite a bit of endurance racing (just competed in the 24 Hours of Adrenalin World Championships a couple of weeks ago) and am often pushing my bike up steep rocky sections that would chew a normal mountain bike shoe to shreds. The X-Alp eats up anything you throw at it, plus it's the most comfortable cycling shoe I've ever worn. It's also very easy to walk in on the street if you happen to use it for a work commute.

The Version I use is the X-Alp Low, and it has a combination lace and velcro closure system, unlike the X-Alp Seek (above) which is lace-up only. I also like the look of the X-Alp Low much better than the Seek.

You can read reviews on the MTBR (Mountain Bike Review) website at http://www.mtbr.com/cat/mtb-apparel-...49_144crx.aspx

Here's what it looks like, and here's a link you can find it for sale.
http://www.performancebike.com/shop/...tegory_ID=2120

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