EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › Off-Season Sports & The Lighter Side › Cycling › 1x7 commuter built on a cyclocross frame, what drivetrain?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

1x7 commuter built on a cyclocross frame, what drivetrain?

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 
I going to buy a used Fuji Cross cyclocross frame and have a LBS build it as a 1X7 commuter bike for my daughter. This bike will be used in the Chicago area with no hills to speak of. I have a set of new 700cx32H wheels with a Shimano 14-34T, 7-speed cassette on the rear.

I need to select a drivetrain, including the front crank & female specific platform pedals. Any suggestions?

Michael
post #2 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by WILDCAT View Post
I going to buy a used Fuji Cross cyclocross frame and have a LBS build it as a 1X7 commuter bike for my daughter. This bike will be used in the Chicago area with no hills to speak of. I have a set of new 700cx32H wheels with a Shimano 14-34T, 7-speed cassette on the rear.

I need to select a drivetrain, including the front crank & female specific platform pedals. Any suggestions?

Michael
female specific platform pedals? i ve heard of everything now.

are you running flat bars or road bar on it?

no more rollerblades i take it?
post #3 of 17
Thread Starter 
Some Fuji Cross owners complain of interference between the pedals and the front tires, so smaller pedals (and feet) will help solve that problem.

The 1 X 7 drivetrain is a good urban set up and should be cheap too.

I'm thinking flatbar, but have not decided. The frame is $175 and the wheels are a sunk cost, I'm hoping to do this for $300.

Michael
post #4 of 17
post #5 of 17
Brakes, bars, tape, stem, headset, saddle, seatpost, bottom bracket...? It all might add up.
post #6 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lonnie View Post
http://harriscyclery.net/itemdetails.cfm?ID=1215

Consider 165 mm unless she's taller than 5'6" or has preternaturally long legs.

Quote:
I'm thinking flatbar, but have not decided. The frame is $175 and the wheels are a sunk cost, I'm hoping to do this for $300.


What brakes do you plan to use?
post #7 of 17
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by comprex View Post
http://harriscyclery.net/itemdetails.cfm?ID=1215

Consider 165 mm unless she's taller than 5'6" or has preternaturally long legs.

What brakes do you plan to use?
[/color]
The crank looks good, what spindle?

Brakes?...dont know... the frame & fork have attachments for cantilever brakes.

Looks good if I go the 2 X 7 route.

Quote:
Brakes, bars, tape, stem, headset, saddle, seatpost, bottom bracket...? It all might add up.
That's the challange. The Fuji Cross is $1000 and the cheapest new CX bike is about $500. Keeping below $450 should be possible.

Michael
post #8 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by WILDCAT View Post
The crank looks good, what spindle?
Shimano UN-71 in 107mm looks to be the proper choice.

Quote:
Brakes?...dont know... the frame & fork have attachments for cantilever brakes.
Tektro Oryx, hmm, would seem to imply roadie levers and therefore bars, just to keep the mechanical advantage correct. That makes shifting easy: one barcon and a medium cage RD. It also gives you the option of double brake levers later.
post #9 of 17
Canti bosses also allow you to run flat bars and v-brakes, which would provide much better stopping power than cantis. Flat bar, and a right hand Alivio 7spd shifter would be a good setup, I'd say. Maybe moustache bars?
post #10 of 17
Check your Pms and get what I sent it 8spd but it will work and is very cheap for everything but the seat and seat clamp.

Like everything, Brakes, shifters, derailuer, crankset, wheels, cassette, fork, stem, chain and handlebars.

You will only need Bottom Bracket, Seat post, seat, new cables and some fastens that are there.
post #11 of 17
Thread Starter 
Well the project didn't add up to well. The frame finally sold on ebay for $300, The project would have cost another $200 and that kills it. I'm seeking out something like a used Jamis Coda at this point.

Thanks for the help & suggestions. I'm planning on building a faster commuter for me this winter, and the planning done here will not be wasted.

Michael
post #12 of 17
I think one thing you can take away from this is that you can get more bike for less $ if you buy a complete bike rather than build one. I'll admit I'm not a savvy bike buyer, I bought most of my bikes new from brick and mortar stores, but buying frame, gruppo, wheels, etc., etc. separately is going to cost more. I'd be looking at a custom frame if I was going to build a bike. Doesn't make sense to me otherwise.

You said you were going to have a shop do the build which sounds like a couple hundred for labor alone.
post #13 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by telerod15 View Post
I think one thing you can take away from this is that you can get more bike for less $ if you buy a complete bike rather than build one. I'll admit I'm not a savvy bike buyer, I bought most of my bikes new from brick and mortar stores, but buying frame, gruppo, wheels, etc., etc. separately is going to cost more. I'd be looking at a custom frame if I was going to build a bike. Doesn't make sense to me otherwise.

You said you were going to have a shop do the build which sounds like a couple hundred for labor alone.
Quoted for truth.

http://konaworld.com/08_dew_c.htm
This is what you should buy your daughter. No-nonsense commuter bike. 3x8 gearing, v-brakes, 700c wheels, rigid fork. $400 Canadian, so probably a bit less for those of you in the States. Very few other bike company's hybrids come close to the Dew for value for money. When my friends say they want to buy a bike, this is the bike I point them to.
post #14 of 17
Thread Starter 
I agree that a factory built bike from a company like Kona or Jamis is a good buy and the most rational decision.

Part of the attraction of building a bike is the educational & enjoyment aspect. When I was a young adult, I drove Italian sports cars and needed to do my own maintenance to keep them going without blowing my budget. It was also a hobby that I enjoyed.

I can afford a new bike I am going this route for my daughter. It's cheaper and more reliable, no doubt.

But next year I'll buy the tools and build a rugged & fast commuter. Half the fun will be knowing how it went together and being a more self reliant bike owner.

Michael
post #15 of 17

i just turned a vintage steel mtb to a 1x7

any crank will do. shimano lx is good enough to use again on other bikes for years. . got a bunch of cheap tools from nashbar and they work fine.
post #16 of 17
Thread Starter 
I have plans to go ahead with this project. One change; the bike will be for me, not my daughter and I'll be getting a new CX frame.

Michael
post #17 of 17
Thread Starter 
Ok, now the details;

I'm starting with this;



See: http://www.somafab.com/frames.html

I would like to finish with this;



The frame is $305.00 at bikemania: http://www.bikemania.biz/ProductDeta...leCro ssFrame .

With the help of Josh, I got all this from eBay, including the wheels & tires for $205 : http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll...MEWN:IT&ih=016.

[ IMG ][ /IMG ]

I already have two wheel-sets, first these new Fuji Cross take off's (below) for $96 shipped: http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll...MEWN:IT&ih=003

[ IMG ][ /IMG ]

with 700cx28 Gatorbacks for fast weekend rides.

A second, 36 spoke French wheelset for $109 shipped:

[ IMG ][ /IMG ]

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll...MEWN:IT&ih=022

These will be mounted with 700cx38 Armadillo's for commuting in Chicago.

The next part is to build her up!

Michael
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Cycling
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › Off-Season Sports & The Lighter Side › Cycling › 1x7 commuter built on a cyclocross frame, what drivetrain?