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Okay, BWPA, I put clipless pedals on my MTB...

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 
...and, given that you told me to do this, I'm holding you personally responsible for any blood-letting or bone-breaking that might ensue as a result.

:

For good measure, I put flats on my husband's bike:



I warned him about the potential for shin-munching, but he's undeterred. We'll see who bleeds first...
post #2 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Acrophobia View Post
...and, given that you told me to do this, I'm holding you personally responsible for any blood-letting or bone-breaking that might ensue as a result.

:

For good measure, I put flats on my husband's bike:



I warned him about the potential for shin-munching, but he's undeterred. We'll see who bleeds first...
you ll love me eventually but your husband on the other hand should buy some shin guards with those pedals...gawd those look like they could hurt.
post #3 of 15
Crank Bros 50/50s aren't too bad for the shin munching, but I'm not a fan of them as pedals. They're pretty neat to look at, but they spent so much time making them low-profile that the bump for the axle protrudes too much. I prefer a concave pedal with limited amounts of pins. Shimano DX (a racing BMX pedal) and the Specialized Low Pro mag pedals are my favourites.
post #4 of 15
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA View Post
you ll love me eventually but your husband on the other hand should buy some shin guards with those pedals...gawd those look like they could hurt.
Bwahaha..."eventually."

That implies an indeterminate, intervening period of intense hatred, angst and gnashing of teeth.



I did mention shin guards to the husband, but it didn't seem to register. I think he'll be fine on the dirt roads and rail trails; but when we move to single track, I'll tell him to either wear shin guards or pack his own first aid kit.
post #5 of 15
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bobatt View Post
Crank Bros 50/50s aren't too bad for the shin munching, but I'm not a fan of them as pedals. They're pretty neat to look at, but they spent so much time making them low-profile that the bump for the axle protrudes too much. I prefer a concave pedal with limited amounts of pins. Shimano DX (a racing BMX pedal) and the Specialized Low Pro mag pedals are my favourites.
Looks Good On Bike is a primary consideration at present.

And I would make a derisive comment about that except...they really DO look good on the bike. Super sweet. I may borrow them, now that I have unlocked the deep mysteries of the Pedal Wrench and the Reverse Threading.
post #6 of 15
Haha, don't worry, if you endo, it's good to have the bike attached to your feet so you continue to be in control even upside down.

Ride through town once and you will be accustomed to clipping out. It's a natural easy thing. I was used to toeclips, so I pulled back instead of twisting the first time I came to a light, and I fell over, but that only happened once.

Sit on a table with lower legs hanging free and observe how your feet align. Set the cleats so the neutral position is the same. It probably doesn't matter much with the Frogs, but I think it's good to have your natural position near the middle of the range. I went with Time ATAC when I experienced a knee problem because they were less $ and provide good float, but I think Frogs are even better. Use orthotics especially if you have flat feet, often associated with patella femoral syndrome. Leg extensions and hamstring/calf stretches. I think you tweaked it riding low saddle with platform pedals. You should be able to keep riding, easy spin, stop if it hurts, etc. Biking caused the injury but it's good therapy for that injury if done right. Enjoy the ride!
post #7 of 15
Thread Starter 
I have Frogs on my commuter bike, so I'm hoping the transition will be smooth.

I'm pretty sure I did myself in by doing no biking at all for much of June and then OMG LOTS OF BIKING! when the 40F drizzle stopped and the sun finally came out. The mtb seat height probably didn't help. I wound up raising my commuter bike seat also, about a cm. We'll see how that goes. And I'm doing the extensions and stretches, as ordered by the mistress of torture - I mean, the PT.

Yes, I've discovered that my knees are happier when I'm moving around rather than sitting still, so I've got some easy, spinning rides planned for the weekend. Cheers!

Quote:
Originally Posted by telerod15 View Post
Haha, don't worry, if you endo, it's good to have the bike attached to your feet so you continue to be in control even upside down.

Ride through town once and you will be accustomed to clipping out. It's a natural easy thing. I was used to toeclips, so I pulled back instead of twisting the first time I came to a light, and I fell over, but that only happened once.

Sit on a table with lower legs hanging free and observe how your feet align. Set the cleats so the neutral position is the same. It probably doesn't matter much with the Frogs, but I think it's good to have your natural position near the middle of the range. I went with Time ATAC when I experienced a knee problem because they were less $ and provide good float, but I think Frogs are even better. Use orthotics especially if you have flat feet, often associated with patella femoral syndrome. Leg extensions and hamstring/calf stretches. I think you tweaked it riding low saddle with platform pedals. You should be able to keep riding, easy spin, stop if it hurts, etc. Biking caused the injury but it's good therapy for that injury if done right. Enjoy the ride!
post #8 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Acrophobia View Post
And I'm doing the extensions and stretches, as ordered by the mistress of torture - I mean, the PT.
Just remember, cycling IS PT.
post #9 of 15
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by epic View Post
Just remember, cycling IS PT.
Actually, I had dinner this evening with a physiatry resident, who told me that the current thinking on patellofemoral syndrome is that it's related to relative weakness of the hip abductors and external rotators. Inline skating works these muscles extensively.

So skating is PT also!
post #10 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Acrophobia View Post
of the hip abductors and external rotators. Inline skating works these muscles extensively.

So skating is PT also!
Have you had someone show you

swizzle
scooter
crazy legs

drills?
post #11 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Acrophobia View Post
Actually, I had dinner this evening with a physiatry resident, who told me that the current thinking on patellofemoral syndrome is that it's related to relative weakness of the hip abductors and external rotators. Inline skating works these muscles extensively.

So skating is PT also!
Skating is probably what I'll be doing to keep my lazy butt moving until the wrist is able to handle shifting and braking.

Gotta love multiple interests, eh?
post #12 of 15
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by comprex View Post
Have you had someone show you

swizzle
scooter
crazy legs

drills?
Yes to scooter pushes and swizzles, I've been taking lessons. Don't know what crazy legs is, though.

TC, skating is an amazing workout. I think it's much harder than biking. I have to pace myself or my heart rate goes stratospheric. The feeling is so much fun - and it's even more fun to go fast! I'm still kinda chicken on hills, but I'm getting there.
post #13 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Acrophobia View Post
Yes to scooter pushes
Ah, very good. The next thing to try is to draw a 10 foot diameter chalk circle on the ground and do scooters around it: the trick is to never let the inside skate leave the inside of the circle.

You'll be on the outside edge of the inside skate in no time.

Now try to chase someone around the circle.

Now the other way 'round.

Now shrink the circle to 8 foot.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Acrophobia View Post
and swizzles, I've been taking lessons.
Can you do swizzles on the outside edges only yet? Looking at the skates from the front, thus:

....||....
....\/....
...\../...
..\..../..
.|......|.
..\..../..
...\../...
....\/....



(if your skates are properly set up for you, you should be able to touch the bottoms of the wheels together)


Can you do them with alternate outside and inside edges, looking at the skates from the front, thus:

....||....
..../\....
.../..\...
../....\..
.|......|.
..\..../..
...\../...
....||....

Quote:
Don't know what crazy legs is, though.
Crazy legs is a modified swizzle, where the center position is scissored.

The front leg of the scissor alternates.

Thus, looking from the top:

.....L.....
.....R.....

...L...R...
..L.....R..
.L........R.
..L.....R..
...L...R...

.....R.....
.....L.....


Eventually the goal is to combine the alternation of crazy legs with the edge control of swizzles. If you can do swizzles on corresponding edges (i.e. they separate looking like // or \\ from the front), and combine that with crazy legs, you can do double push and skate in the rain. The deeper the scissor on crazy legs, i.e.

...R.......
.......L...

The closer you will be to being able to do crossovers whilst skating in a straight line, and turning you might wish for will be controlled by the weight transfer you learned while doing scooters in circles.
post #14 of 15
Thread Starter 
Comprex, I am very impressed with your typographical drawing skills!

I can do swizzles on any edge, forwards and backwards, they are very easy for me, for some reason. Translating that to getting onto corresponding edges is difficult, however. Using ski poles initially might help me get over that "I'm going to topple" feeling (and sometimes it's more than a feeling!).

Good point about the chalk. It's a lot easier for me to turn if I have a physical cue to follow, like the line on a rink, for instance. Crazy legs sounds like a fun drill, thanks!
post #15 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Acrophobia View Post
I can do swizzles on any edge, forwards and backwards, they are very easy for me, for some reason.
Good skate fit, good edge awareness



Quote:
Translating that to getting onto corresponding edges is difficult, however. Using ski poles initially might help me get over that "I'm going to topple" feeling (and sometimes it's more than a feeling!).
Ah, that diving off to the side feeling. That feeling is gold. That feeling is fun. That feeling is efficiency. That feeling is speed. And it translates to skiing.

My current notion is that the wobbliness and unsteadiness of that sensation actually derives from how passive the set-down (inside) leg tends to be amongst learning and slower skaters.

Put another way, the leg supports the vertical load fine, but is a bit too lazy to take over the steering action.

IMO, the softer that "inside"/"short"/"set down" knee is, and the more the skate is actually skated instead of held rigid in one place under the pelvis, the less objectionable that topple is to overall perception of balance.

I think I saw someone describe the motion as a kick. I think of it as a 'scooping' motion where inside skate is brought from behind the pelvis forward in a quick arc paralleling the outside skate.


Thus, (v) is chin, positions slightly exaggerated in #3:

1
.....L(v).....
..... ..R......

2
...L.R(v)....

3
....R......
..L..(v)..

4
....(vR)....
.............

5
.....(v)R....
.......L......
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EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › Off-Season Sports & The Lighter Side › Cycling › Okay, BWPA, I put clipless pedals on my MTB...