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Easy To Ski Powder Skiis - Page 2

post #31 of 43
just wondering how many people that where suggesting a "normal" powder ski have skied
1) pure powder as in cat/heli skiing for a few full days
2) have skied a few of the fun shapes more then a few runs

I really have not seen many people go back to trad powder skis after a day of both 1 & 2
post #32 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldefarms View Post
I apreciate everyones current and future input.

First of all I agree with those who have suggested that there is no substitute for lessons.
I agree with that philosphy 100%.
I am amazed at those golfers who can barley break a 100 and they are positive that if they go out and purchase a new driver for $400.00 that all of their problems will go away and they will be competing for the club championsip.

Having said that the reason i am thinking of buying powder skiis
is that i make two trips a year out west to go cat skiing ( 14 days of skiing) in BC.

I would also use them if we got a dump back east and I could skip work.
Otherwise I ski on my METRON 9 (74 underfoot) 161 in length
Get any kind of reverse camber ski. They make skiing much much easier.
post #33 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by mntlion View Post
just wondering how many people that where suggesting a "normal" powder ski have skied
1) pure powder as in cat/heli skiing for a few full days
2) have skied a few of the fun shapes more then a few runs

I really have not seen many people go back to trad powder skis after a day of both 1 & 2
I'm wondering if you've ever skied an intermediate trail at Okemo.

A R/R ski there would be 100% unusable. That leaves 2 weeks of cat skiing, well worth using a R/R... but why purchase it? Why not rent for the trip?
post #34 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by Whiteroom View Post
I'm wondering if you've ever skied an intermediate trail at Okemo.

A R/R ski there would be 100% unusable. That leaves 2 weeks of cat skiing, well worth using a R/R... but why purchase it? Why not rent for the trip?
In case you have not noticed, intermediate trails at Okemo have 100% *nothing* to do with this discussion - other than to frame where the OP usually skis & let us know he's happy on his M9s there. The question is about skis targeted at powder use in the west & perhaps some opportunistic use in the east.

If you know you will be taking said trips. And you know the specific skis you want might to use are still hard to come by in rental fleets, why not buy a set? I suspect that 2 weeks of cat skiing a year is still more days of annual use than the average ski owner puts on their boards in a year. How many dealers here would suggest a prospective customer go rent elsewhere instead of buy if the prospective customer "only" skied 2 weeks a year? But bring up skis out of the entrenched comfort zone & the result here is predictable...

The question mntlion asked is interesting & still stands, what is your experience with various forms of rocker & reverse/hybrid sidecut?
post #35 of 43
Spindift,

I own DPS Lotus 120's... YES, I have heli skied with them.
I've skied numerous length Katanas.
I've skied Hellbents.
I've skied 4frnt EHPs.
I've skied Kuros
I've skied Chopsticks
I've skied Line pollards
I've skied some skis that haven't made it to production yet...

Let's say you have no idea who I am and what I 'know' or 'don't know'.
post #36 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by spindrift View Post
In case you have not noticed, intermediate trails at Okemo have 100% *nothing* to do with this discussion - other than to frame where the OP usually skis & let us know he's happy on his M9s there. The question is about skis targeted at powder use in the west & perhaps some opportunistic use in the east.
Actually, the terrain he is comfortable on speaks volumes about what type of ski he should or shouldn't look at.
post #37 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by Whiteroom View Post
Spindift,
...
Let's say you have no idea who I am and what I 'know' or 'don't know'.
Hence the question(s)...

The fact that I seem to recall skiing a few laps with the OP (not sure he remembers) last winter in CO probably tells me as much as trail listings. Of course if I'm having a senior moment, that bet is off...

Given the stated application, why do you feel Praxis/Kuro/Pontoon is less than optimal? These strike me as quite appropriate choices -- but yielding a bit to your point, the kinds of skis (along with things like Hell Bents or Rockers) some of the better capitalized cat ops are likely to hand someone these days.

As long as it's summer & drifting a bit seems fair game, under what conditions have you skied most of those and what did you think? What'd you think of the Chopstick? I've heard mixed reports... Any interesting protos?
post #38 of 43
Head has a ski in the works that is really, really good.

110mm waist, about 20cm of rocker in the shovel (about 2cm of lift) and about 10cm of rocker in the tail (about 1cm of lift), slight camber underfoot, traditional sidecut. It has Head's usual damp solid feel yet is VERY playful. James Heim is the man behind the design, I skied a pair with him in mid April at Whistler, there was about 5" of duff over a rock hard base. So far this is my favorite 'fun shape' I've skied... should make it to market late next season as a 2010 model.

I've skied the Katana 183cm on numerous conditions, we have a shop demo. I like the surfy feeling shovel, I like the solid turn completion from the tail on trail... not sure I like thew surfy tip/ hooked up tail combo in eastern woods.

Chopstick just isn't my cup-o-tea, but I wasn't on it in powder, more like slush (where the Katana 190 just KILLED it).

I LOVE the DP, I think it is an unbelievable ski, it's the best eastern wood ski I've ever been on, stable, solid, super light, ridiculously quick. You can shut down forward speed in an instant by diving the tails (ala Burton Fish). The only negative is... they are clumsy on harder surfaces, the torsional stiffness combined with pretty much zero sidecut means they want to go straight/ pivot/ go straight, arcing turns is not happening. I skied them at Revelstoke, where we had powder up high and in the trees, wind slab on open faces and firm groomed snow lower down. The 2000' vertical run outs at SG speed was 'interesting'.
post #39 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by Whiteroom View Post
Head has a ski in the works that is really, really good.

110mm waist, about 20cm of rocker in the shovel (about 2cm of lift) and about 10cm of rocker in the tail (about 1cm of lift), slight camber underfoot, traditional sidecut. It has Head's usual damp solid feel yet is VERY playful. James Heim is the man behind the design, I skied a pair with him in mid April at Whistler, there was about 5" of duff over a rock hard base. So far this is my favorite 'fun shape' I've skied... should make it to market late next season as a 2010 model.
I've been nagging Bob about something like this & he said Head was not biting on the rocker thing... Any comparison to the 08/09 JJ?
post #40 of 43
Hi Mr. Whiteroom:

This sounds similar to the 09 ObSethed. the ObSethed had 15 degrees of tip and tail rocker over the top and bottom 20cm of length. The Head you allude to has 5cm more rocker in the tip and tail. Maybe a MAGIC RATIO of rocker, camber and side cut is in the offing??
BTW how was the DPS Lotus 120 in Tight Ec Trees: Beyond Beaver Pond, Timbuktoo Glade and Kitzbuhl@ Jay Peak or Deep Mtn Jag Glade At Wlidcat??
I know you have been all over this tight tree EC dealio and I value your impressions.

Thanks,
Got
QUOTE=Whiteroom;924537]Head has a ski in the works that is really, really good.

110mm waist, about 20cm of rocker in the shovel (about 2cm of lift) and about 10cm of rocker in the tail (about 1cm of lift), slight camber underfoot, traditional sidecut. It has Head's usual damp solid feel yet is VERY playful. James Heim is the man behind the design, I skied a pair with him in mid April at Whistler, there was about 5" of duff over a rock hard base. So far this is my favorite 'fun shape' I've skied... should make it to market late next season as a 2010 model.

I've skied the Katana 183cm on numerous conditions, we have a shop demo. I like the surfy feeling shovel, I like the solid turn completion from the tail on trail... not sure I like thew surfy tip/ hooked up tail combo in eastern woods.

Chopstick just isn't my cup-o-tea, but I wasn't on it in powder, more like slush (where the Katana 190 just KILLED it).

I LOVE the DP, I think it is an unbelievable ski, it's the best eastern wood ski I've ever been on, stable, solid, super light, ridiculously quick. You can shut down forward speed in an instant by diving the tails (ala Burton Fish). The only negative is... they are clumsy on harder surfaces, the torsional stiffness combined with pretty much zero sidecut means they want to go straight/ pivot/ go straight, arcing turns is not happening. I skied them at Revelstoke, where we had powder up high and in the trees, wind slab on open faces and firm groomed snow lower down. The 2000' vertical run outs at SG speed was 'interesting'.[/quote]
post #41 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by Whiteroom View Post
Spindift,

I own DPS Lotus 120's... YES, I have heli skied with them.
I've skied numerous length Katanas.
I've skied Hellbents.
I've skied 4frnt EHPs.
I've skied Kuros
I've skied Chopsticks
I've skied Line pollards
I've skied some skis that haven't made it to production yet...

Let's say you have no idea who I am and what I 'know' or 'don't know'.
What did you think of the Kuros?
post #42 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gotama View Post
BTW how was the DPS Lotus 120 in Tight Ec Trees: Beyond Beaver Pond, Timbuktoo Glade and Kitzbuhl@ Jay Peak or Deep Mtn Jag Glade At Wlidcat??
I know you have been
I'm not Whiteroom, but I have skied his DPs a few times. The first time was during a small storm at Stowe. We probably only had 4-5" of dense new snow on top of a softish base. We skied some very tight woods, a wide open trail and a long chute. I only did two runs on the DPs and was on my Blizzard Cronus the rest of the time. In the tight woods, the DPs were amazing. I think I skied much faster (but with the same control) than I could on the Blizzards. The DPs are 190s, but they felt like 150s in there. They also did a nice job of making it feel like there was more snow than there really was. The snow was a good bit deeper in the chute and tough to ski. I would have liked to be on the DPs in there.

The next time we skied, we had a couple other pairs of skis.I know we had the Katanas and the DPs. I cant remember if we had my Blizzards or my Goats (it's nice when everyone has the same size boot). We were skiing new snow on top of a hard freeze. In those conditions I thought the DP would be the best ski in the bunch. In reality, I think it was the worst. Scary even, and I don't mean on the trail, but in the woods. I liked the Katana the best that day. I found it to be much easier to ski than I had heard it would be.

I'd buy the Katana before the DP, but I don't think either one was a big leap over the Goat. I think Whiteroom will tell you that the DP wasn't even that big a leap over the Cronus (we're talking about an 88mm wide ski vs. 120mm, so you'd expect a lot more).
post #43 of 43
I get to ski powder every 3.5 years. I picked up some K2 Apache Chiefs last year before the Utah gathering and they served me well. I had never skied those skis in powder before and there was zero adjustments needed, just point'em and go. This was true powder test too as the snow was DEEEEP! I was also able to actually carve a turn or two on the groomers.

Look for a deal on some leftover Chiefs on Ebay. You can get a pair for a great price I'll bet.
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